Jane Quarterman appointed to Faculty at Georgia Southwestern Lab School 1938

Jane Quarterman (1905-2005)

Jane Quarterman

Jane Quarterman at South Georgia Teachers College (now Georgia Southern University) 1938. Quarterman served as Art Editor on the college yearbook staff. The Quarterman farm was in Lowndes County, south of Ray City, GA

Jane Sinclair Quarterman was born October 29, 1905    Her parents were David Sinclair Quarterman Sr. and Alla Irene Peek.  She was the older sister of noted ecologist, Elsie Quarterman.  Jane Quarterman spent her childhood with her family in Valdosta, GA.  When she was about thirteen or fourteen, the family moved to a farm in north Lowndes county.  The postal address of the Quarterman farm was Ray City, GA although the  farm was actually south of the town and south of the Berrien county line.

Jane attended Valdosta High School, then Valdosta State College.  In 1938, she attended South Georgia Teachers College (now Georgia Southern University) where she earned a BS in Education Supervision Elementary Schools.

According to Electric Scotland, Jane Sinclair Quarterman taught in Lowndes County, and “an especially memorable year at St. George school, Charlton County, Ga., in the Okefenokee Swamp, where she tried to bring not just book learning but also art and a Christmas tree, which she said was the first they’d seen.”  She later taught in Moultrie, GA

In the fall of 1938,  Jane Quaterman was named to the faculty of the experimental laboratory school as Georgia Southwestern College (now Georgia Southwestern State University).

Jane Quarterman of Ray City, GA

Jane Quarterman of Ray City, GA

Butler Herald
September 8, 1938

Faculty is Named For G.S.C. School

         Americus, Sept. 1. – The faculty for Georgia Southwestern College’s experimental Laboratory School at the Anthony school on the College campus was announced today by W. F. McGehee, director of the educational department under the college’s newly organized education program.
        Four graduates of the South Georgia Teachers College at Statesboro will be on the faculty.
       It includes: Misses Miriam Burgess, Ashburn, B. S. degree, fifth and sixth grades; Ruby Hubbard, Carnesville, B. S., degree, fourth grade; Onida Gilson, Cobbtown, B. S. degree, second grade and Jane Quarterman, Ray City, B. S. degree, first grade.
        Southwestern’s laboratory school is part of a new experimental program attempting to better fit its normal diploma graduates to meet the stiff competition of the teaching profession, Mr. McGehee has explained.
      “For many years we have taught our normal students how to teach from a book,’ he said, “but we have failed in what I consider one of the fundamental principles; we have failed to give them practical training in our laboratory school, under the supervision of Georgia Southwestern education instructors and our unusually well qualified staff at the school, normal students will get training equal to a year’s training as a practical teacher before they get their diplomas.”
      He explained that it will be easier for graduates of the new program to get teaching jobs under the strict state requirements.
       Other experiments are being planned he said.

Jane Quarterman of Ray City, GA

Jane Quarterman of Ray City, GA

The George-Anne
October 17, 1938

S.G.T.C. Roses Making Good At Americus

      “Four Roses” have made good at Georgia Southwestern College, according to a feature storyin the Macon Telegraph. They are Miss Jane Quarterman, Valdosta, chief rose; Miss Ruby Lois Hubbard, of Carnesville; Miss Ouida Glisson, of Metter, and Miss Miriam Burgess, of Ashburn.
        These “Roses” were among he first to complete the course given by a Rosenwald scholarship for supervision here at S. G. T. C. They proved themselves to be excellent students and were placed at Georgia Southwestern in an attempt to jack education out of a rut of mediocrity. They have inaugurated a new type of grammar grade education that makes education desirable to children instead of being dreaded. The “Four Roses” are four of five teachers in the school – the only four Rosenwald students banded together for practical purposes in the United States. The course they follow in teaching is somewhat revolutionary. The student works at something interesting rather than rushing through a text book. There is no special periods, everything is correlated.

The Rosenwald scholarships were funded by Julius Rosenwald.  The Georgia Southern University website provides the following:

Born in Springfield, Illinois, Rosenwald was part owner of what was America’s leading mail-order business—Sears, Roebuck and Company. Under Rosenwald’s leadership, Sears evolved into a popular bricks-and-mortar merchandise store and one of the largest retail chains in America. He served as its vice president and treasurer from 1895 to 1910, as president from 1910 to 1924, and as chairman of the board of directors from 1924, until his death in 1932.

The business luminary is equally known for his extraordinary philanthropy efforts, which far outpaced the work of his contemporaries. Established in 1917, the Julius Rosenwald Fund raised millions of dollars for rural and minority schools and colleges throughout the United States. Thanks to Rosenwald’s generosity and dedication to education initiatives, more than 5,000 “Rosenwald Schools” were built in the rural South to help educate African-American youths. In addition, roughly 4,000 libraries were added to existing schools.

Because of [its] role as a leader in rural education, Georgia Teachers College was able to secure grants from the Rosenwald Fund in order to raise the educational level of teachers in rural public schools as well as establish scholarships for future teachers who wished to work in rural schools. 

 

Jane Quarterman later earned an MS in Education Elementary Principal from the University of Georgia; she also studied at Duke University and Columbia University.

Jane Quarterman married Walter Graves Comer of Americus, Ga.  He died May 7, 1942.

Jane Quarterman Comer on the death of her husband.

Jane Quarterman Comer on the death of her husband.

The Electric Scotland website has published a more extensive sketch of Jane Quarterman Comer at http://www.electricscotland.com/familytree/magazine/augsep2005/story22.htm

Related Posts:

Elsie Quarterman, Noted Ecologist, Once Resident of Ray City

 

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Classroom Building and Soup Kitchen at Ray City School

Classroom Building  and Soup Kitchen at Ray City School

Classroom Building at Ray City School.

Classroom Building at Ray City School.

The white wooden classroom building  was already an old building on the campus when Diane Miley attended second grade at Ray City School in 1939.

This building, which was originally located where the kindergarten is now situated, and was later moved further back from Pauline Street to its present location. The entrances to this building were on the north and south sides. A
central north-south hallway ran through the building. On the east side were two big classrooms for the 1st and 4th grades, and a small room used as the Soup Kitchen. On the west side were 2nd Grade and 3rd Grade classrooms. There were no bathrooms in this building, or in the main brick school building for that matter. The toilets at that time were outdoor toilets. the Ray City school did not get indoor toilets until after WWII.

The teachers in this wooden building were:

1st Grade: Mrs. P.M. Shultz
2nd Grade: Miss Josephine Collier
3rd grade: Eloise Johnson
4th grade: a young unmarried teacher

Other Ray City teachers around that time were Jesse Francis Webb, Hazel Tabor, Dorothy Chisholm, and Mary Peele, James Garland Grady.  Julius Glen Tatum was an Ag teacher.

This building housed the original “soup kitchen” lunch room at Ray City School. Off of the 4th grade classroom was a small room which was used as the lunch room. It measured about 10 feet by 12 feet and was equipped with  a cook table, but no sink counter. A big cast iron wood-burning stove occupied one corner of the room.  There were counters and benches along two walls where the children ate.  The lunchroom ladies  could not feed many children at a time. The charge for lunch was 10 cents, but not all children could afford to get a hot lunch. Many brought their lunch from home and ate in the school yard.

Mrs. Hun Knight worked hard to bring the soup kitchen to the school and worked in the kitchen. Mrs. Eula Swindle Hall was the first cook. She was followed by Mrs. Allie Purvis Starling. Leila McConnell also cooked. Martha Burkhalter was a lunchroom “waitress.” Agnes Knight Guthrie also helped in the kitchen. For the paying students, soup was served every day, with brown whole-wheat flour biscuits and butter. The kitchen was supplied with surplus government commodities supplemented with fresh produce that was brought in by local farmers in trade for their children’s lunches. Rossie Futch brought in sweet potatoes in trade for a hot lunch for his children.

Later, after the first school cafeteria building was constructed on the Ray City School campus in 1941, the small soup kitchen was turned into a trigonometry classroom for the high school students.

Related Post

WWII Vets added Vocational Building at Ray City School

History of Ray City School

Second Grade Portraits, Ray City School, 1939

1939 Ray City School 10th Grade

Charles Woodrow Schmoe ~ Ray City School Principal

Ray City School 1934

Ray City School Gets Lunch Room, 1941

Senior Class of 1951, Ray City School

Ray City School Teachers 1950-51, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia

Senior Class of 1951, Ray City School

Wilma Harper Shultz Began 60-year Teaching Career at Ray City

1939 Ray City Glee Club Goes On Tour

Ray City Class of 1930 Didn’t Walk

Ray City Girls Form Athletic Club, 1947

W.R. McClure Resigns as Ray City Principal

Mrs. Schmoe ~ Ray City Teacher

1951 Beaverettes Couldn’t Miss; Boys Went Afoul at Homerville

Sankey Booth, Wiregrass Educator

Ray City, GA Women’s Hoops, 1934

Queen of the Harvest celebrated Ray City Gymnasium

Tri-Hi-Y, 1939

 

WWII Vets added Vocational Building at Ray City School

Vocational School for WWII Vets

In 1948, a vocational building was erected by the veterans of World War II, at the end of five years this … [became] a part of Ray City School.

The Class of 1949 wrote, “This year, 1949, the veterans are also completing a very modern and up-to-date lunchroom, which is a great asset to our school. “

Veterans at Ray City School, 1948-49

Veterans at Ray City School, 1948-49

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WWII Veterans at Ray City School, 1948-1949.

WWII Veterans at Ray City School, 1948-1949.

Albert Studstill was one of the Ray City WWII veterans that helped build the Vocational buildings at the Ray City School and also at the old high school in Nashville, GA .

Geunie Griner’s Tap & Dance Show

Geunie Griner, circa 1960, musician, comedian, newspaper publisher of Berrien County, GA.

Geunie Griner, circa 1960, musician, comedian, newspaper publisher of Berrien County, GA.  Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

Geunie Griner

A former Ray City School student tells us that in the 1940s, Geunie Griner  taught music and tap dancing classes in the schools at Nashville and Ray City, GA and possibly at other county schools.  “He would teach the kids perhaps 1st through 3rd grade and some that were even younger. He would go to the schools and offer the dancing classes as an extra curricular activity. Students paid extra for the lessons. At the end of the lessons, he would put on a big show with all the students performing. They wore fancy little costumes.”

New Lois School Reunion, 1997

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New Lois consolidated school, 4th, 5th, 6th Grades, 1933-34 the first year the school was opened. Identified front row left to right: Lucian Parrish, William Forehand, Elby Ray, –––––––– Buckholt, Lamar Weaver, Ronald Parrish, Alton Akins, Pete Akins, Bernys W. Peters. Second row: Amos Luke, C.H. Ray, Lucille Knowles, Camilla Comer, Edna Francis Fountain, Rudelle Lee, Alma Luke, Clementine Mickell. Back row: Hazel Sirmans, ––––––– Fountain, Myrtice Jordan, Helen Griffin, Verna Jordan, Lawanna Griffin. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

New Lois consolidated school, 4th, 5th, 6th Grades, 1933-34 the first year the school was opened. Identified front row left to right: Lucian Parrish, William Forehand, Elby Ray, –––––––– Buckholt, Lamar Weaver, Ronald Parrish, Alton Akins, Pete Akins, Bernys W. Peters. Second row: Amos Luke, C.H. Ray, Lucille Knowles, Camilla Comer, Edna Francis Fountain, Rudelle Lee, Alma Luke, Clementine Mickell. Back row: Hazel Sirmans, ––––––– Fountain, Myrtice Jordan, Helen Griffin, Verna Jordan, Lawanna Griffin. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

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New Lois School when the campus was at its peak. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

New Lois School when the campus was at its peak. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

 

New Lois School Reunion, 1997

New Lois School Reunion, 1997

News Clipping, November 1997

New Lois School students gather for reunion

        About 70 people gathered at the New Lois Community Center (former New Lois School) in Berrien County, for the fourth school reunion.
        There were former students, a principal, a county school superintendent, a school bus driver, lunchroom workers, spouses, family and friends.
        Howard Barker led the group in an opening prayer at the Nov. 1 event. Each person introduced himself, and several told of their memories in years past at New Lois School.
        Sixteen people attended the reunion for the first time. They were Roscoe Stallings of Nashville (former county school superintendent; Doris Lightsey McKinnon of Homerville; Billy Frank Hayes of Bonaire; Ines Hayes Wilson of Adel; Mattie Lou Stevens McLendon of Nashville; Vivian Browning of St. Augustine, Fla.; Royce Noles of Valdosta (former students); Alice Hayes of Bonaire; Dale Hollrah of Nashville; Wylene Lott of Nashville; E. W. Wilkerson of Ray City (spouses); Sherry Carter of Homerville; Christopher Carter of Valdosta; Beck Nash of Nashville; and Edith Peters of Ray City (family members of friends).
        Sarah Blanton, 92, of Valdosta, was recognized as being the oldest teacher present. She taught at Old Lois School. Dorothy Akins of Nashville was the oldest teacher present who taught at New Lois. Johnny Pat Webb, 81, was the oldest student from Old Lois and a bus driver for New Lois. Lucile Noles Browning of Lakeland was the oldest student from New Lois and Don Haskins was a principal teacher at New Lois. Gladys Sargent, 85, of Nashville, was the oldest lunchroom worker.
        According to the registry, Roma Parrish Krejci (former student) and her husband, Ed from Livingston, Texas, traveled the farthest.
        Nine were remembered who have died since the reunion in 1995: W.T. Barker, Nelda Nash Smith, Carroll Cumbus, Hazel Hancock Johnson, Juanita Weaver Fletcher and Ima Jean Ray Beck (former students); Rita Wilkerson Parrish and Victoria Bennett Coppage (former teachers); Ouida Knight Weaver (former lunchroom worker).
        A quilt was handmade and donated by Lucile Noles Browning, Leila Mae Noles Miller and Bessie Noles Johnson. At mealtime, a lucky ticket was drawn by Alton Akins. The winner was Jimmy Hand of Adel. The proceeds of the quilt will go into the New Lois Reunion Fund.
        The blessing was said by Johnny Pat Webb. Serving on the 1997 committee were Pete and Dorothy Akins, Howard Barker, Lucille Browning, Jo Ann McCray, Leila Mae Mller, Annie Belle Outlaw, Carolyn Griffin and Lamar Carter.
        Following lunch Mr. Stallings had a display set up on one of the kitchen tables, a replica of Old Lois School, the girls basement (outdoor privy) and some earlier desk used at Old Lois and other schools throughout the county in earlier years. All of the items were handcrafted by Mr. Stallings, who is known throughout New Lois Community and surrounding areas for his woodworking skills. When asked about the boy’s basement, he pointed to a sign which read “Boys to the creek.”
        It was requested that Carolyn P. Griffin entertain at the piano and several joined in the auditorium for a sing-a-long.
        The social committee for the next reunion is Philip Akins, chairman, Billy Cornelius, Furman Ray, Vivian Browning, Charles Donald Napier, Lamar Carter and Charlie Barker. The reunion will be at 10 a.m. the first Saturday in November 1999 at the New Lois Community Center.

 

Other faculty at New Lois School included Thera Hambrick, Arlo Futch SneadMaxie Snead Patten, Bernys Peters and Grace Swindle, of Ray City, GA.  Earl Weaver and Lella Forrest Long were also on the New Lois faculty. Before WWII, St.Elmo Lee taught agriculture at both New Lois School and at Ray City School. Gerald Huff coached the boys basketball team in 1952.

Other students attending the school included Edna Bennett, Myrtice Jordan, Hazel Ray, Hazel Fletcher, Alma Luke, Lucille Knowle.  In the 1930s, Latrelle Shaw, Lawana Shaw and Otis Shaw attended the New Lois School, walking the four mile distance from their parents’ home near Ray City both ways, daily. Reva Rice and Hubert Comer were students in 1936-37.

Frances Cornelius

Frances Cornelius, born 1938,  lived with her family on Possum Creek Road just west of Ray City, GA.  Her father, Shellie Wade Cornelius, was a bus driver for the Ray City School and her mother, Pearl Williams Cornelius was a teacher.

Frances Cornelius, 1952-53 sophomore at Ray City School

Frances Cornelius, 1952-53 sophomore at Ray City School


Frances "Frankie" Cornelius, Senior, Class of 1955, Berrien High School, Nashville, GA

Frances “Frankie” Cornelius, Senior, Class of 1955, Berrien High School, Nashville, GA

At Berrien High School, Frances Cornelius was a member of 4-H, Glee Club, Tri-Hi-Y, and Future Homemakers of America. She also play on the Girls basketball team and was a cheerleader.

Sue Nix, Miss B.H.S. of 1954

Sue Nix, from the New Lois area near Ray City, GA. Her sister taught music at Ray City.

Sue Nix attended Berrien High School in Nashville, GA, where she was a member of 4-H, Glee Club, Tri-Hi-Y, Broadcaster Staff, Rebel Yell, Annual Staff,  Dramatics Club, and Future Homemakers of America. She served on the  Student Council, and as  Class Vice President and Class Treasurer. She was the Sweetheart of the Future Farmers of America Sweetheart and was elected Miss B.H.S. of 1954.

Sue Nix, 1953

Sue Nix, 1953

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Sue Nix, 1954

Sue Nix, 1954

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Sue Nix, 1955 Senior, Berrien High School, Nashville, GA

Sue Nix, 1955 Senior, Berrien High School, Nashville, GA. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

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1954 Miss Berrien High School, Sue Nix

1954 Miss Berrien High School, Sue Nix. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

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1954 Homecoming Court - photo from Valdosta Daily Times QUEENS AND COURTS – Here are the football and Berrien High School beauty queens and their courts as they appeared recently at a homecoming in Nashville. Left to right are Anelda Baker, Nancy Nix, Joanne Register, Sally Jo Connell, Patricia Carter, football queen, Sue Nix, Miss Berrien High School, Elaine Carter, Imogene Holland, LulaBelle McEuen and Louise Shouse.

1954 Homecoming Court – photo from Valdosta Daily Times QUEENS AND COURTS – Here are the football and Berrien High School beauty queens and their courts as they appeared recently at a homecoming in Nashville. Left to right are Anelda Baker, Nancy Nix, Joanne Register, Sally Jo Connell, Patricia Carter, football queen, Sue Nix, Miss Berrien High School, Elaine Carter, Imogene Holland, LulaBelle McEuen and Louise Shouse. Image and caption courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

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1954 Miss Berrien High was Sue Nix, resident of the New Lois community near Ray City, GA. The 1954 Football Queen was Patricia Carter.

1954 Miss Berrien High was Sue Nix, resident of the New Lois community near Ray City, GA. The 1954 Football Queen was Patricia Carter. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

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FFA Sweetheart Sue Nix with FHA Beau Kenneth King, Berrien High School, Nashville, GA

FFA Sweetheart Sue Nix with FHA Beau Kenneth King, Berrien High School, Nashville, GA. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

Ray City School, Eighth Grade 1960-61

Ray City School, Eighth Grade 1960-61

In 1954, Ray City High School and all other white high schools in the county were combined into Nashville High School.  The brick school building at Ray City continued to serve as an elementary and middle school until 1994, when all county schools were consolidated into facilities in Nashville.

Ray City Elementary School. Mrs. Taylor & Mrs. Patten's Eighth Grade, 1960-61.

Ray City Elementary School. Mrs. Taylor & Mrs. Patten’s Eighth Grade, 1960-61. Front Row, fourth from the left is Johnny Guthrie. Other Identifications needed.

Boyette Sisters at Georgia State Womens College

Dorothy and Doris Boyette at Georgia State Womans College

Doris Boyett, of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA

Doris Boyett, of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA

Dorothy Boyett, of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA. 1945

Dorothy Boyett, of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA. 1945

In 1944, Doris Boyette was a senior at GSWC and her younger sister,  Dorothy “Dot” Boyette was a freshman.  Doris was born 27 Oct 1923; Dot was born May 14, 1926. The girls grew up just east of Ray City, GA, in the adjacent portion of Lanier County. Their parents were Eddie D. Boyette  and Mattie Deen Boyette.

At GSWC, Doris was living in Ashley Hall,  a dormitory for sophomores; her roommate was Clare Carson, who was president of the sophomore class.

October 4, 1944 GSWC Campus Canopy mentions petite blond Dorothy

October 4, 1944 GSWC Campus Canopy mentions petite blond Doris Boyette, of Ray City, GA

Among the Boyette’s 1945 classmates was Carolyn DeVane, also of Ray City, GA. There have been many other Ray City women of G.S.W.C. over the years.

Ashley Hall, Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA 1845

Ashley Hall, Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA 1845

The girls’ activities in 1944-45 included the Polio Drive, scrap paper salvage, planting the Camellia Trail, and dancing with those men from Moody Airfield.  The May 9, 1944 edition of the Campus Canopy student newspaper reported. “It’s boy trouble for Dot Boyette…which of the four do you intend dating Sunday night, Dot? – Gee, we wish we could get one date. ”

1945 women of GSWC at Saturday night dance with the men from Moody Airfield.

1945 women of GSWC at Saturday night dance with the men from Moody Airfield.

The October 4, 1944 school newspaper reported:

“There they were, standing all alone just waiting for us to ask them to dance…Men, men and more men and not one of them had a chance.
    To quote one Freshman, Ann Maddox, “It was wonderful just to look at a man.”
    The dance was swell, but that familiar tap on another’s shoulder could mean one of two things…height of ecstasy or depths of despair…’til the next girl broke. This from Lawanda McCellar, as if she were just tearing herself away from it all.
    “Course I wished my fella had been there,” sighed Mary Tharpe, but what chance would I have had with him if he had been.”
    Annes Jean NeSmith summed it all up in a few words…”Plenty of men, good dancers, nice plausible lines, and I can hardly wait ’til next Saturday night.”
    “I’m still overcome by the sight of those men, to express an honest opinion.” says Betsy Markert still in a daze.
    “All in all the opinion of Converse is that it was wonderful and everybody had a good time, but give us men. We see women all week, is the general idea.
    Favorable opinions were not limited to the college girls though. Several of the Moody Field boys were carefully eavesdropped on. Result: “I just can’t believe it, so many girls. If I were to write my mother and say 15 girls cut in on me she would say I was crazy drunk, or lying.”

The hit songs those college girls were swooning to in 1944-45?  The Campus Canopy mentioned:

In 1945, Dorothy Boyett was elected treasurer of the Baptist Student Union.  In the Winter Quarter, 1945 Dorothy “Dot” Boyette was elected to the Sophomore Council.  “Members of the house council check lights, cards and attend the simple cases of Student Government violation. They are elected at the beginning of each quarter to serve a term of three months.”  Dot Boyett also served on the advertising staff and the business staff of the Campus Canopy.

By late 1945 Dorothy Boyette left Georgia State Womans College and was working in Brunswick, GA.

Dot married Charles Gordon Howell. He was a grandson of Caswell Howell, pioneer settler and one of the first ministers of the First Baptist Church of  Milltown (now Lakeland), GA. Dot and Charles raised crops and children in Lakeland, GA. Their son, Charles Howell, Jr. became Chief of Pediatric Surgery at the Medical College of Georgia. Their grandson, Charles Howell III, is a professional golfer.  Dorothy Boyette died June 2,1985. Interment was at Lakeland City Cemetery, Lakeland, GA.

Doris Boyette married John Sears and moved to Atlanta, GA.

Obituary of Doris Boyette Sears

Doris Boyett Sears age 87, of Atlanta, GA, passed on Sunday, June 26, 2011. She was predeceased by her husband, John Sears, daughter, Susan Elaine Sears, sisters, Irene B. Smith and Dorothy B. Howell. She is survived by her daughter, Pamela McKinney of Lawrenceville, sister, Louise Davidson of Bonaire, GA, brother, Earl Boyett of Lakeland, GA. 2 grandchildren, Robert Morris and Jennifer Shelton, 4 great grandchildren, Kayla Shelton, Savannah Shelton, Avri Shelton and Joshua Morris, numerous nieces and nephews, cousins and extended family also survive. Mrs. Sears was a charter member of the Johns Creek Baptist Church, a member of the Senior Choir, a Food Pantry Volunteer and an avid Gardner. A Funeral Service to Celebrate the Life of Mrs. Sears will be at 3:00 P.M. on Thursday, June 30, 2011 at Wages Lawrenceville Chapel. Interment will follow in the White Chapel Memorial Gardens, Duluth.

More Ray City Women of G.S.W.C

West Hall, Georgia State Womans College, 1945

West Hall, Georgia State Womans College, 1945

From 1922 to 1950 the state college in Valdosta, GA was known as Georgia State Womans College (now know as Valdosta State University”.  A number of Ray City women who attended the college during this period were featured in a previous post. Here are a few more who appeared in available yearbooks:

Doris and Dot Boyette were daughters of Eddie D. Boyette  and Mattie Deen Boyette. Their home was in Lanier County, just east of Ray City.

Doris Boyett, of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA

Doris Boyett, of Ray City, GA, 1942 sophomore at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA

Dorothy Boyette

Dorothy Boyett, of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA

Dorothy Boyett, of Ray City, GA. 1945 sophomore at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA

Carolyn DeVane was a daughter of Caulie A Devane and Alma L. Albritton, and sister of Harold Elmore DeVane who was serving in the Navy. She grew up in the Lois community just west of Ray City, GA.

Carolyn DeVane, 1945, Freshman

Carolyn DeVane, 1945, Freshman

Marian Hambrick, sister of Thera Hambrick, was a daughter of Ruth and John O. Hambrick. Her family’s place was in the Cat Creek community, just southwest of Ray City.

Marian Hambrick, 1941, Freshman

Marian Hambrick, 1941, Freshman

 

Louise Paulk was a daughter of  Gladys Daniels and James M. Paulk. Her father died when she was a toddler and her mother remarried Hun Knight. Her step-father was the owner of the Mayhaw Lake amusement park at Ray City.  Her half-brother was Jack Knight, who attended college at Valdosta after the school went co-educational.

Louise Paulk, 1939, GSWC

Louise Paulk, 1939, GSWC

Marilyn Faye Weaver was a daughter of John W. Weaver and Irene Guthrie. The Weaver farm was just east of Ray City in the 1300 Georgia Militia District in Lanier County, GA.

1949-marilyn-weaver-GSWC

Marilyn Weaver, 1949, freshman at Georgia State Womans College.

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