John R. Wood Goes to Paris

Ray City, GA was the boyhood home of John Rhoden Wood, a son of Milledge Dewey Wood and Nancy Caroline Rhoden. He went on to a long career as a diplomat with the US State Department, serving primarily in France, from WWI to WWII.

John R. Wood, 1920 passport photo.

John R. Wood, 1920 passport photo.

John Rhoden Wood was born in Dupont, GA on February 7, 1894. Some time before 1910, the Wood family moved from Dupont to the 1329 Georgia Militia District, near Ray City, GA where John R. Wood spent his teenage years.

At the time of the draft for WWI John R. Wood was living in Jacksonville, FL and working for the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. He was 23 years old, of medium height and build, with blue eyes and brown hair. Wood entered the Army and was sent to France. He achieved the rank of Second Lieutenant before receiving an honorable discharge.

About 1920 John R. Wood married a French girl, Jeanne Victorine Brissaud.

Jeanne Victorine Brissaud, 1920 passport photo.

Jeanne Victorine Brissaud, 1920 passport photo.

That year Wood applied for a passport  to return to France, giving his permanent residence as Ray City, GA.

John R. Wood 1920 Passport Application

John R. Wood 1920 Passport Application

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Washington, DC

I, John R Wood, a native and loyal citizen of the United States, hereby apply to the Department of State, at Washington, for a passport for myself and my wife, Mrs. Jeane B. Wood.

I solemnly swear that I was born at Dupont Ga in the State of Ga, on or about the 7 day of Feb, 1894, that my father, M D Wood, was born in Coffee County Ga, and is now residing at Ray City Ga. that I have resided outside the United Stats at the following places for the following periods:

Paris, France. from Dec 1, 1918 to July 1, 1920 and that I am domiciled in the United States, my permanent residence being at Ray City in the state of Ga.

I am about to go abroad temporarily, and I intend to return to the United States within -{months/years} with the purpose of residing and performing the duties of citizenship therein; and I desire a passport for use in visiting the countries hereafter named for the following purpose:

France  – Returning to present employment

I intend to leave the United States from the port of New York sailing on board the  (name of vessel) on September 15, 1920.

Further, I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God.

J. R. Wood

Sworn to before me this 14th day of July, 1920
D F Smith
Agent, Department of State

In the margins the notation was added, “Honorable discharge from Army dated August 11, 1919 and giving rank as 2nd Lieut  seen and returned 7/14/20.”

The description of applicant gave his age as 26 years and height as 5 foot 11 inches.  He was fair in complexion with a full face, light hair,  high forehead, hazel eyes, straight nose, small mouth and square chin.

John Rhodes Wood's 1920 passport application gave his permanent residence as Ray City, GA.

John R. Wood’s 1920 passport application gave his permanent residence as Ray City, GA.

After some time in France,  John Wood made the return passage on the SS Rochambeau.

Over the next decades John R. Wood made several transatlantic voyages.  In May of 1926 he made the return crossing aboard the SS France.  At the time it was one of the fastest liners afloat.

SS France

SS France

In 1929 he sailed from Le Havre, France to New York aboard the SS Ile de France. The census of 1930 shows that John R. Wood and family were living in Paris, France where he was employed as Vice Consul.

SS Ile de France, photographed circa 1935

SS Ile de France, photographed circa 1935

On April 18, 1934 John R. Wood again departed from France, sailing from Le Havre aboard the SS Paris and arriving at the port of New York on April 24.  He gave his address in the U.S. as the Department of State, Washington, DC.

S.S. Paris, once the most luxurious ocean liner in the world.

In 1934 John R. Wood sailed aboard the S.S. Paris, once billed as the most luxurious ocean liner in the world.

In 1939, Wood made the Atlantic crossing on the SS Normandie.

SS Normandie at sea in the 1930s.

SS Normandie at sea in the 1930s.

More than a year after Germany invaded France during WWII,  John Wood departed Europe from Lisbon, Portugal on August 1, 1941, on the USS West Point.

USS West Point, August 1, 1941

USS West Point, August 1, 1941

Jeanne Brissaud Wood died on June 14, 1974 in Nice, France.

Later, John R. Wood made his residence in Colquitt County, GA.  He died in Savannah, GA on June 30, 1996 at 102 years of age.

In death he returned to his boyhood home of Ray City, GA where he was interred at Beaver Dam Cemetery, with his parents and others of the Wood family connection.

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Milledge Dewey Wood and the First Cotton Blooms of 1912

On June 25, 1912, The Valdosta Times reported on some of the first cotton blooms of the season. The growers were G. W. Carter, of Lois, and Milledge Dewey Wood, of Ray City, GA.

Valdosta Times
June 25, 1912

Messrs. G. W. Carter of the Lois District and M. D. Wood of Rays Mill, were  among the first to send in cotton blooms to the Herald.  They are among the enterprising farmers of the county, and have their crops in fine condition.  We appreciate the favor of these friends in keeping us posted on their farming operations.

Milledge Dewey Wood  was the father of George W. Wood and father-in-law of Creasy Brown Wood, subject of previous posts (see Creasy Brown Wood buried at Dupont, GA).

M. D. Wood was a son of Josiah Wood and Caroline Meeks. His gravemarker gives his birth date April 28, 1862, but from census records it appears that he was actually born in 1860.

At the time of his birth, his father, Josiah Wood, was farming in Macon County, GA near the town of Lanier. But with the outbreak of the Civil War, his father joined Company E of the 4th Georgia Cavalry.  Josiah Wood did not serve long in the Confederate States Army. Due to a disability he was discharged after just one year of service.

Some time before 1870, young Milledge moved with his family to Coffee County, GA, where his father farmed a small place valued at $200.

The 1880 census record for M. D. Wood has not been located, but in 1883 he married Nancy Caroline Rhoden. In 1900, the couple made their home in Dupont, GA where Milledge owned  farm free and clear of mortgage.

By 1910 the Nancy and M. D. Wood had moved their family to Georgia Militia District 1329, the Connells Mill district, near Ray City, GA. Wood rented a farm on the Rays Mill-Cat Creek road, next door to farms of  Lacy Lester Shaw and Francis Marion Shaw.

In 1920, Wood was farming a place outside of Ray City,  on the Nashville Road.  On the farm next door was Gideon Gaskins.

Children of Nancy Caroline Rhoden and Milledge Dewey Wood:

  1. George Washington Wood 1884 – 1960, married Creasy Brown
  2. Joseph Bryant Wood 1885 – 1969
  3. Ely Benjamin Wood 1888 – 1978
  4. Willie Westberry Wood (1889 – 1974) – worked for E.M. “Hun” Knight, and later Clements Sawmill
  5. Laura Wood 1891 – 1973
  6. John Rhoden Wood 1894 – 1996
  7. Celia Caroline Wood 1896 – 1988
  8. Lulu Wood 1899 – 1974
  9. James Oliver Wood 1901 – 1975
  10. Dewey Franklin Wood 1906 – 1988
  11. Eliza Bell Wood 1909-1910

Milledge Dewey Wood died October 31, 1932.  He was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery in Ray City, GA

Grave marker of Milledge Dewey Wood, Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA

Grave marker of Milledge Dewey Wood, Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA

Related Posts:

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Fate Mixon

Thomas Lafayette “Fate” Mixon (1862-1919)  was the brother of William Henry Mixon ( 1854-1915), and the son of Michael Mixon (1830-1911), subjects of earlier posts.

Thomas Lafayette "Fate" Mixon with wife, Julia Clance and another Clance girl. Image courtesy of http://royalmixon.tribalpages.com

Thomas Lafayette “Fate” Mixon with wife, Julia Clance and a Clance girl (Ophelia Taylor?). Image courtesy of http://royalmixon.tribalpages.com

The two brothers, Fate and William, married two sisters, Julia and Mary Clance, respectively.

Fate Mixon was born during the Civil War in December of 1862 while his father, James Michael Mixon, was  serving in the Confederate Army as a private in Jack Brown’s Company H of the 59th Georgia Regiment. After the war, his father came home to Marion County, GA but within a few years his parents had maritial troubles.  At least by the time Fate was seven years old his parents had separated.

Fate, and his older brothers and sisters remained with his father.  By the time of the 1870 census, they had moved to Twiggs county, GA where they lived with Fate’s grandmother, Sena Mixon. Also enumerated in the household was twentysomething-year-old Amanda Smith, who would soon become Fate’s step-mother, and her one year old daughter, Rosetta. Everyone in the household who could walk helped with the farm labor.

Fate’s mother, Drucilla Balcomb Mixon, and his youngest brother, Madison Bartow Mixon, remained behind in Marion County.

In the 1880 census of Lowndes County, GA  seventeen-year-old Fate was enumerated in the Cat Creek district along with his blended family, which by this time included his older brother Benjamin (age 20), step sister  Rosella J. (age 11), and half siblings  Zelphian V. (age 7), Drica D. (age 5), John (age 2) and Nancy (age 10 months).

In 1900,  the bachelor Fate Mixon was living in the household of his brother, Benjamin Franklin Mixon, in the Rays Mill district of Berrien county, GA. There he apparently met and married Julia Clance. Berrien County marriage records show they were married  on May 28, 1905.  In actuality, the bride was Julia Clance Taylor, at 27 a widow with a seven year-old daughter, Ophelia Taylor; Fate Mixon was 41.

Marriage certificate of Thomas Lafayette Mixon and Julia Clance, 1905, Berrien County, GA. Image courtesy of http://royalmixon.tribalpages.com/

Marriage certificate of Thomas Lafayette Mixon and Julia Clance, 1905, Berrien County, GA. Image courtesy of http://royalmixon.tribalpages.com/

Fate and  Julia, with Julia’s daughter Ophelia, established a household in the Rays Mill District, where they were enumerated in 1910. Fate Mixon rented a farm there, which he worked on his own account.

This union, however, did not endure. Some say Fate and Julia separated. Other say Fate died around 1919; his grave marker does not give his date of death.

Gravemarker of Thomas L. Mixon, 1862 - 19__. New Bethel Baptist Church Cemetery, Lowndes County, GA

Gravemarker of Thomas Lafayette “Fate” Mixon, 1862 – 19__. New Bethel Baptist Church Cemetery, Lowndes County, GA

It is known that Julia was re-married on March 27, 1919 to James William Coleman , and that she and Ophelia went with him in Macon, GA

 

Related Posts:

 

Military Honors Rendered For Owen Leonard Clements

Owen Leonard Clements and three other soldiers drowned in the Rio Grande during a border skirmish at Progreso, TX on January 26, 1916.

Image detail- military honors for Sergeant Owen Leonard Clements, Corporal Michael F. Ring, Private Perry H. Rhode, and Private Charles D. Wilton Best, drowned January 26, 1916

Image detail- military honors for Sergeant Owen Leonard Clements, Corporal Michael F. Ring, Private Perry H. Rhode, and Private Charles D. Wilton Best, drowned January 26, 1916

Clements was a sergeant serving with Battery D, 4th Field Artillery Regiment, on the Mexican border. Owen Leonard Clements (subject of previous post: see Owen Leonard Clements and the 4th Field Artillery) grew up in the Ray City, GA vicinity and entered the Army as a young man.

The bodies of three of the drowned men were found five days later about five miles down stream from Progreso, as reported in the The Chicago Day Book:

Bodies of soldiers drowned in the Rio Grande recovered.  The Day Book, January 31, 1916.

Bodies of soldiers drowned in the Rio Grande recovered. The Day Book, January 31, 1916.

The Chicago Day Book
January 31, 1916

BODIES OF SOLDIERS DROWNED IN RIO GRAND RECOVERED

Brownsville, Tex. , Jan. 31. – Bodies of three of four United States soldiers who drowned while crossing Rio Grande last week to aid in rescue of two comrades kidnapped by Mexican bandits have been recovered.  They are those of Corp. Michael L. Ring of Lenox Mass.; Private Perry A. Rhodes of Seattle, Wash., and Private Charles W. Wilton-Best of East Boston, Mass.  The two former were of Battery D., Fourth Field artillery, and the latter of Troop A., Twelf cavalry.
     A hat was thrown in river at Progresso, Tex., where men were drowned.  When hat stopped with current at a point five miles below Progreso, two charges of dynamite were exploded in river there.  The three bodies rose to the surface.  None of them bore any wounds, dispelling theory that soldiers were hit by Mexican bullets before they went down.

Additional reports indicated the search for Clements continued:

January 31, 1916 edition of The Day, New London, CT reports on the recovery of the bodies of three soldiers who drowned in the Rio Grande. The body of Owen Leonard Clements is reported still missing.

January 31, 1916 edition of The Day, New London, CT reports on the recovery of the bodies of three soldiers who drowned in the Rio Grande. The body of Owen Leonard Clements is reported still missing.

The New London Day
January 31, 1916

U.S. SOLDIERS NOT SHOT BY MEXICANS

Dynamite Floats Bodies of Three Victims – Examination Shows No Wounds.

      BROWNSVILLE, Texas, Jan. 31. – Use of dynamite has resulted in the recovery today of the bodies of three of the four soldiers drowned in the Rio Grande, Jan. 26,  at Progreso, Texas, when American soldiers entered Mexico in an effort to rescue two companions.  The bodies recovered were those of Corporal Michael Ring and Private Henry A. Rhode, Battery B, Fourth field artillery, and Private Charles D. Wilton Best of the Twelfth cavalry.
    Examination of the three bodies at an undertaker’s establishment where they were embalmed last night revealed no bullet wounds and so disposes of the rumors that they were drowned after being shot by Mexicans.
      Search for the body of Sergt. Owen Clements will continue tomorrow.

Within a few days the body of Owen Leonard Clements was also recovered.   The Army provided a funeral service for the four soldiers with full military honors.

Quadruple funeral for Sergeant Owen L. Clements, Corporal Michael F. Ring, Private Perry H. Rhode, and Private Charles D. Wilton Best, drowned January 26, 1916.  The Robert Runyon Photograph Collection, 01167, courtesy of The Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin.

Quadruple funeral for Sergeant Owen L. Clements, Corporal Michael F. Ring, Private Perry H. Rhode, and Private Charles D. Wilton Best, drowned January 26, 1916. The Robert Runyon Photograph Collection, 01167, courtesy of The Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin.

Quadruple funeral for Sergeant Owen L. Clements, Corporal Michael F. Ring, Private Perry H. Rhode, and Private Charles D. Wilton Best, drowned January 26, 1916. The Robert Runyon Photograph Collection, 01167, courtesy of The Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin.

Quadruple funeral for Sergeant Owen L. Clements, Corporal Michael F. Ring, Private Perry H. Rhode, and Private Charles D. Wilton Best, drowned January 26, 1916. The Robert Runyon Photograph Collection, 01167, courtesy of The Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin.

Quadruple funeral for Sergeant Owen L. Clements, Corporal Michael F. Ring, Private Perry H. Rhode, and Private Charles D. Wilton Best, drowned January 26, 1916. The Robert Runyon Photograph Collection, 01167, courtesy of The Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin.

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Quadruple funeral for Sergeant Owen L. Clements, Corporal Michael F. Ring, Private Perry H. Rhode, and Private Charles D. Wilton Best, drowned January 26, 1916. The Robert Runyon Photograph Collection, 01167, courtesy of The Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin.

Quadruple funeral for Sergeant Owen L. Clements, Corporal Michael F. Ring, Private Perry H. Rhode, and Private Charles D. Wilton Best, drowned January 26, 1916. The Robert Runyon Photograph Collection, 01167, courtesy of The Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin.

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Quadruple funeral for Sergeant Owen L. Clements, Corporal Michael F. Ring, Private Perry H. Rhode, and Private Charles D. Wilton Best, drowned January 26, 1916. The Robert Runyon Photograph Collection, 01167, courtesy of The Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin.

Quadruple funeral for Sergeant Owen L. Clements, Corporal Michael F. Ring, Private Perry H. Rhode, and Private Charles D. Wilton Best, drowned January 26, 1916. The Robert Runyon Photograph Collection, 01167, courtesy of The Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin.

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Military honors for Owen L. Clements, of Ray's Mill, GA. The Schulenberg Sticker, February 11, 1916.

Military honors for Owen L. Clements, of Ray’s Mill, GA. The Schulenberg Sticker, February 11, 1916.

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Gravemarker of Owen Leonard Clements (1886-1916), Cat Creek Cemetery, Lowndes County, GA.

Gravemarker of Owen Leonard Clements (1886-1916), Cat Creek Cemetery, Lowndes County, GA.

1919 Epilogue:

Investigation of Mexican affairs:

Hearing before a subcommittee of the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, Sixty-sixth Congress, first[-second] session, pursuant to S. res. 106, directing the Committee on Foreign Relations to investigate the matter of outrages on citizens of the United States in Mexico, Volume 1, 1919:

On January 26, 1916, Pvts. W. P. Wheeler and Biggo Pederson, Battery D. Fourth United States Field Artillery, while swimming in the Rio Grande just south of Progresso, swam to Mexico side. There they were taken prisoners by the Mexicans and carried back from the river. As soon as it was reported to the officers in charge of the commands, believing that it was the intention of the Mexicans to abuse the two soldiers, Lieut. John E. Mort, Second Lieut. Bernard R. Peyton, and Lieut Albert W. Waldron, all of Battery D, Fourth United States Field Artillery, with about 20 men, started across by fording and swimming. All but Sergt. Owen L. Clements, Corpl. Michael F. Ring, Pvt. Perry M. Rhode, and Pvt. Chas. D. Wilton Best landed safely, but those  named were drowned, their bodies being recovered about three days later.
   This detachment was unable to find the two soldiers, though they searched many houses.  Being informed that Carranza soldiers had taken them and would not maltreat them, the expedition return to the Texas side.  On January 27, 1916, the Carranzists commander at Matamoras turned the two men over to United States Consul Johnson and they were soon back on Texas soil.  A court-martial was convened to try the offending officers, who received some minor reprimand, and were detailed for more onerous duties elsewhere.

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Obituary of William J. Lamb ~ died June 13, 1908

William Joseph Lamb was a confederate veteran who long resided in Georgia Militia District 1144, the Ray’s Mill (nka Ray City) District, Berrien County, GA. His father was William Lamb and his mother was parents, Margaret Carroll, sister of Jesse and James Carroll.  His parents were early settlers of Milltown, now Lakeland, GA.

1908 Photo Detail - William Joseph Lamb (1837-1908) ~ Confederate Veteran

1908 Photo Detail – William Joseph Lamb (1837-1908) ~ Confederate Veteran

William Joseph Lamb, subject of this post, was the younger brother of John C. Lamb, who owned and operated a store in Milltown prior to the Civil War. When the war broke out William J Lamb joined General Levi J. Knight’sBerrien County Minute Men,” Company C , Georgia 29th Infantry Regiment in Nashville, GA on August 1, 1861 (see William J. Lamb ~ Confederate Veteran.)  His brother John joined Company K, 29th Infantry at Milltown. In “Early Settlers of South Georgia“, historian Folks Huxford wrote, “Mr. [John C.] Lamb was elected its first captain. At a re-organizaton of the company, held a few months later, Captain Lamb was promoted to major of his regiment, and Thomas S. Wiley succeeded him as captain. This company took part in all the battles of the western wing of the Confederate army, which suffered much in the Mississippi campaign of 1864. In the battle at or near Jackson, Miss., Major Lamb was killed.”

William J. Lamb survived the war and afterward returned to Berrien County, GA where he married Mary Elizabeth Carroll (see The Poetry of Mary Elizabeth Carroll.) He died at the age of 71, and was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

William Joseph Lamb died June 13, 1908.  His obituary appeared in th June 23, 1908 edition of The Valdosta Times.

William Joseph Lamb died June 13, 1908. His obituary appeared in th June 23, 1908 edition of The Valdosta Times.

Mr. Wm. Lamb Dead.

      Mr. Wm. Lamb, a prominent citizen of the Rays Mill district died Saturday at the home of a son just over in Lowndes county.
      Mr. Lamb  was about seventy years of age and was reared in this county.  He had lived at his home in this county many years and was well known by the people of the county.    The deceased was an upright man, a devout member of the Christian church and was held in esteem by his neighbors and friends.  He is survived by several children, his wife having died about a year ago.
    The funeral was held at Beaver Dam cemetery Sunday. – Adel News.

William Joseph Lamb (1837 - 1908).  Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

William Joseph Lamb (1837 – 1908). Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

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More on Sergeant Owen Leonard Clements

Owen Leonard Clements (subject of previous posts: see Owen Leonard Clements and the 4th Field Artillery and Owen Leonard Clements Drowned During Invasion of Mexico)  was a son of Senie Burkhalter and  Benjamin Franklin Clements. He grew up in the Ray City, GA vicinity and as a young man entered the U. S. Army.  He was serving with Battery D, 4th Field Artillery Regiment in Texas on the Rio Grande  in January of 1916 when he and several men in his unit were involved in an ‘unofficial’ invasion of Mexico. Clements drowned while crossing the Rio Grande.  Here is another account of the incident.

Owen Leonard Clements was among soldiers who crossed the Rio Grande in 1916.

Owen Leonard Clements was among soldiers who crossed the Rio Grande in 1916.

Corpus Christi Caller and Daily Herald
Thursday, January 27, 1916

U.S. SOLDIERS CROSS RIO GRANDE – FOUR OF THEM DIE

SQUAD OF ARTILLERYMEN SWIM RIVER AT PROGRESO TO RESCUE THEIR COMRADES

RETREATING TO AMERICAN SIDE UNDER HEAVY FIRE FROM MEXICANS FOUR AMERICAN SOLDIERS DROWN – THREE LIEUTENANTS WHO LEAD FORAY PLACED UNDER ARREST AND MAY BE COURTMARTIALED

TWO SOLDIERS HELD PRISONERS BY MEXICANS

Sensational Incident Precipitated by Act of Four American Artillerymen Who Swam the River, Two of Them Being Captured as They Climbed the Bank on Mexican Side – Eighteen of Their Comrades Went to Rescue and Battle Resulted

MERCEDES, Texas, January 26. – Four American soldiers are known to be dead and two others are missing as the result of the first armed invasion of Mexico by United States troops, which occurred at Progreso, seven miles southwest of Mercedes at 3:30 o’clock this afternoon.  None of the Americans, however, were killed by Mexican bullets, the four who lost their lives having been drowned while swimming the Rio Grande.

The Dead

SERGEANT OWEN L. CLEMENT
CORPORAL MIKE F. KING
PRIVATE HARRY A. RHOADE, all of the above are of Battery D., Fourth Field Artillery
PRIVATE CHARLES D. WILTON BEST,  troop A., 12th Cavalry

The Missing

PRIVATE WILLIAM P. WHEELER,
PRIVATE BIGGO PATTERSON, both of Battery D.

Beginning of the Trouble

      The trouble started when four men of Battery D., Fourth Field Artillery, which is on patrol duty at Progreso, swam the Rio Grande to the Mexican side.  As soon as they had scrambled up the bank the party was confronted by a number of armed Mexicans, apparently regular soldiers, who demanded their surrender.  Two of the Americans plunged back into the river and escaped, although a fulisade of shots was fired at them.  The other two, Wheeler and Patterson, were captured and the last their comrades saw of them they were being taken toward the brush.
       Shortly after the men who escaped had reported the affair Lieutenant John E. Mort, commanding Battery D., with Lieutenants Peyton and Waldron, fourteen men of the battery and one trooper of the 12th Cavalry, left camp and swam the river with the avowed intention of rescuing the men taken prisoner by the Mexicans.  For two hours the rescue party searched the brush on the Mexican side penetrating for a distance of three-quarters of a mile into the interior, but failed to find any trace of the missing men.  On their return to the river they were fired on from the brush, but did not return this attack.

Men Lost in Retreat

      As the American soldiers plunged into the river to return to their own side Mexicans, who apparently had been following them, opened a brisk fire on the swimming me, which was returned by other men of Battery D., and of Troop A., 12th cavalry, who had mustered on the Texas side of the river to cover their comrades’ retreat, several hundred shots being exchanged.  It was during this retreat that the four artillerymen were drowned but as their bodies have not been recovered it is not known positively whether or not they were struck by bullets.
      As they acted without orders from their superior officers the three lieutenants who lead the dash across the river have been placed under arrest, pending an investigation.  The privates who participated in the affair are confined to quarters and also may be brought before a courtmartial.
     Major Anderson, commanding this department of the border patrol, has telegraphed a report of the affair to Major General Funston at San Antonio, with a request for instructions as to further action.
      Among soldiers and civilians the incident has created the most intense excitement, many alarming rumors having been in circulation throughout the afternoon and evening.  One of these was to the effect that an organized invasion of Mexico had begun and that a score or more American soldiers had been killed.
      Army officers have taken steps to prevent any recurrence of the trouble but men of the ranks are greatly aroused over the probable fate of Wheeler and Patterson.  They remember that in previous cases where American soldiers have fallen into

SQUAD OF ARTILLERYMEN SWIM RIVER AT PROGRESO TO RESCUE THEIR COMRADES
(Continued from Page 1)

hands of the Mexicans only their mutilated bodies having been recovered.

Another Version

      The following version of the affair, somewhat different from the above, which came to The Caller early in the evening by long distance telephone, was received at midnight over the Western Union wires from The Caller’s correspondent at Mercedes:
      “While American soldiers of Battery D, stationed at Progreso, were bathing in the Rio Grande river this afternoon two got too close to the Mexican side, were captured by Mexicans and taken into the interior.  Four other American soldiers who went to their rescue were drowned.
      “About three-quarters of an hour after this happened a detachment of fifty men crossed into Mexico in search of their comrades but returned in an hour or so without them.  They were fired at continually by bandits.”

Owen Leonard Clements Drowned During Invasion of Mexico

Owen Leonard Clements (subject of previous post: see Owen Leonard Clements and the 4th Field Artillery) grew up in the Ray City, GA vicinity.  He entered the U. S. Army and, serving with Battery D, 4th Field Artillery Regiment, advanced to the rank of sergeant.

In 1916, Sergeant Clements was stationed with his unit on the Mexican border near Brownsville, TX.  During a border skirmish incident Owen Leonard Clements died, along with three other American soldiers, while crossing the Rio Grande.

One of the first accounts of the death of Sergeant Owen Leonard Clements came in the El Paso Herald, Thursday Evening Edition, January 27, 1916.  ( Note: In this early account, the newspaper misprinted his name as “Owen B. Clements.”)

El Paso Herald, Thursday Evening, January 27, 1916, El Paso, TX. Owen Leonard Clements drowned along with three other soldiers.

El Paso Herald, Thursday Evening, January 27, 1916, El Paso, TX. Owen Leonard Clements drowned along with three other soldiers.

4 BODIES OF DEAD ARE NOW SOUGHT

Parties Search Rio Grande For the Drowned Who Attempted Rescue.

THREE OFFICERS UNDER ARREST

Returned Privates Say Promise of Mescal Was Decoy Used By Mexicans.

    Brownsville, Tex. Jan 27. – Privates Wm. C. Wheeler and Viggo Pederson of Battery D, Fourth field artillery, who were kidnaped late Wednesday by Mexican bandits and taken south from the border, were rescued by Carranza soldiers and brought to Matamoros today, crossing the international bridge into the United States at 11 oclock.  Dressed in Mexican clothes, they were turned over to American authorities.
     No word had been heard from the men since their crossing the river.  They wore no clothes.  A searching party was sent out from Matamoros and at an early morning hour the Americans were found.
Wheeler and Pederson said they were decoyed to the Mexican side by a Mexican who appeared on the bank while they were swimming.  Wheeler said the Mexican did not appear to be a soldier, but when surrounded by eight Mexicans later, some distance from the bank, they found their captors were all soldiers.  The men were taken to Rio Bravo Wednesday night by their captors, held in jail until midnight, put on a train at 1 a.m. this morning and reached  Matamoros at 8 oclock.  They were taken before Col. Quintinella, where they were told that Mexican civilians were not authorized to arrest them and that the Mexican soldiers were also at fault.  Both men were turned over to United States consul Johnson at Matamoros, who delivered them to Fort Brown. 

     Three American artillerymen and one cavalryman were drowned when three United States army lieutenants and 14 privates invaded Mexico opposite Progreso, Tex., in an unsuccessfuly attempt to rescue Wheeler and Pederson, who swam across the Rio Grande while bathing and were captured by two armed Mexican bandits.

Officers Are Arrested.

     The Americans crossed under a crossfire from the American and Mexican side, but no one was killed or wounded by the gun fire.  Lieut. J. E. Mort, commanding battery D, Fourth field artillery, and Lieuts. Payton and Waldron of the same battery, were ordered arrested Wednesday night by Maj. Gen. Frederick Funston.
Col. E. H. Plummer, commanding the 28th infantry at Mission, Tex., was instructed to send a field officer to Progreso at once.  Progreso is 33 miles west of Brownsville.

Mexican Troops Sent.

     Maj. Gen. Funston reported the occurrence to Col. J. R. Quintinella, commanding on the Mexican side, in the absence of Gen. Alfredo Ricaut.  Col. Quintinella said there was no Mexican patrol opposite Progreso, but immediately telegraphed the Carranza commander at Rio Bravo, Mex., nine miles south of Progreso to send a detachment of troops to the rescue of privates Wheeler and Pederson.

Two Effect Escape.

     According to reports received here, the trouble started when four members of D Battery stripped and swam across the Rio Grande at Progreso.  Two of them, Wheeler and Pederson, were taken prisoners and marched into the interior.  The other two soldiers swam back to the American side, several shots being fired from the southern  side of the river.

Officers Search for Men.

     Nearly an hour later Lieuts. Mort, Payton and Waldron, with 13 artillerymen and one cavalryman, swam the river, under protection of gunfire from the American side.  On the Mexican shore they are said to have searched two Mexican houses without finding any trace of Wheeler and Pederson.  On their return to the American side, an hour later, they were fired upon 10 or 12 ties by men in the Mexican brush.
The Americans drowned were: Sergt. Owen B. Clements, Corp. Michael F. King, private Harry A. Rhodes, all of D battery, Fourth field artillery, and Private Charles D. Wiltenbest, troop A, 12th cavalry.
Maj. General Funston said the blame apparently rested with persons on the American side of the border, and that he had issued the strictest orders to officers and men not to cross the Rio Grande under any circumstances.

      Bad feeling had existed among Americans and Mexicans in the Progresso district since last summer when there were  many conflicts there during the Mexican bandit operations.  Two American soldiers were killed in that vicinity.

Bodies Not Recovered.

           The bodies of the four soldiers who were drowned had not been recovered today, but those searching for the corpses  expected to find them before dark. Parties  are searching the river between here and Progreso, Tex.     
(Continued on page 5, Col. 3)

MEXICANS RETURN AMERICAN SOLDIERS
(Continued from Page 1.)

     There were no boats available at the point of crossing.  The officers and men swam the river carrying only pistols and cartridge belts.

Funston Reports to Washington.

     Washington D. C., Jan 27. – Maj. Gen. Funston reported to the war department today the drowning of four and the capture of two American soldiers near Brownsville, Tex., Wednesday. His dispatch contained a  report by Maj. Anderson, commander of the 12th cavalry, and says:      “I have directed Col. Plummer, 28th Infantry, to send one of his field officers to investigate.  Mr. Garza, Mexican consul, has been informed of the contents of Maj. Anderson’s telegram and of the arrest of the three officers concerned.  He has gone to Matamoros to inform the commander general there and to ask that immediate search be made for privates Wheeler and Pederson.  The Mexicans on the other side were not in uniform.”
The state department has not yet taken up the subject with the defacto government of Mexico.  The war department’s information regarding the incident near Brownsville was turned over to the state department for its information and secretary Lansing took it  under consideration.

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Related Posts:

 

Owen Leonard Clements and the 4th Field Artillery

Owen L. Clements was born February 11, 1886 in Berrien County, GA,  a son of Benjamin Franklin Clements and Senie Burkhalter.  He was more frequently known by his middle name, Leonard.

In the Census of 1900 Leonard Clements was enumerated along with his family in the Rays Mill District, Georgia Militia District 1144 of Berrien County.  Leonard’s father was a farmer who owned his home and land free and clear of mortgage. While his father worked the fields, 14-year-old Leonard,  and his siblings who were of age, attended school.

Some time before 1910, Leonard joined the U. S. Army. He was stationed at Fort Russell near Cheyenne, Wyoming and assigned to Battery D, Fourth Field Artillery. The 4th Field Artillery Regiment was first activated in 1907 from numbered companies of artillery.

Fort Russell, Cheyene, Wyoming. Image courtesy www.wyomingtalesandtrails.com

Fort Russell, Cheyenne, Wyoming.

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Stables, Fort Russell, Cheyene, Wyoming. Image courtesy of www.wyomingtalesandtrails.com

Stables, Fort Russell, Cheyenne, Wyoming. Image courtesy of http://www.wyomingtalesandtrails.com

In early 1913, the 4th Field Artillery Regiment was dispatched from Fort Russell to Galveston, Texas by President Taft in anticipation that intervention would be required in Mexican civil unrest. Portions of the 4th Field Artillery were involved in the occupation of Vera Cruz in 1914 and afterward returned to Texas.

4th Field Artillery, Texas City, TX, 1914.

4th Field Artillery, Texas City, TX, 1914.

By August, 1915 Clements’ unit, Battery D, Fourth Field Artillery was stationed at Mercedes, Texas on the Mexican border.
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Frances Clements’ 1944 Rendezvous with Frogs, Formulas, and Figures

Frances Clements, daughter of Hod P. Clements of Ray City, GA and subject of previous posts ( A Shower for Frances Clements),  excelled at technical studies.  After completing high school at  the Ray City School she went on to enroll at Georgia State Womans College, now known as Valdosta State University, entering with the freshman class in 1943. In 1944,  her extra-curricular activities included the Math-Science Club.

Frances Clements, of Ray City, GA.  A 1944 sophomore at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA.

Frances Clements, of Ray City, GA. A 1944 sophomore at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA.

Beauty and brains, Frances Clements went out for the Math-Science Club. The activities of the club reflected the war-time enrollment at the college:

Math Science Club

 Our rendezvous with frogs, formulas, and figures combines our interest into one club, the Math-Science Club.  There are three divisions: Chemistry; Biology, and Mathematics; and the students may become a member of any one of these groups according to their chief interest. These divisions present monthly programs and bring the practical nature of the sciences to the members.

      This year the club has endeavored to do its bit for the war effort by contributing part of the dues, and proceeds from a dance and the scrap paper drive to the War Bond Scholarship Fund.

Old Yaller’s Widow Was Denied Pension

In 1891 Mary A. Chapman, widow of “Old Yaller” Elbert J. Chapman , was destitute and applied for a Conderate Widow’s Pension from the State of Georgia. The pension was denied on the grounds that Chapman was a deserter.

Born Mary Ann Boyd in Lowndes County in the year 1836, she was a daughter of Aden Boyd and Nancy Sykes.  Her parents were neighbors of Dred Newbern and Jonathan Sirmans. County deed records show that on February 22, 1839, Aden Boyd purchased land from Levi J. Knight. This land was a part of lot 356, 10th district of what was then Lowndes but now Berrien County. Her parents were Primitive Baptists, and her father donated the land for Empire Church, which was originally known as Boyd’s Meeting House.

Mary Ann Boyd married Elbert J. Chapman in June of 1859.

Mary A. Chapman’s application for a Confederate Widow’s Pension was based on his service in Levi J. Knight’s Berrien Minute Men, but across the cover of the application was scrawled in large letters and underlined for emphasis – “Refused.” Further notations included, “husband shot for desertion.”

The application included an Affidavit made by the Widow Chapman.

According to Mary Chapman’s sworn statement, E. J. Chapman enlisted in the Berrien Minute Men in mid-September, 1861. “Some time during the war he was killed by his own men for deserting one company and going to another company of our own Army, and to the best of applicants knowledge, he was killed in North Ga in the year 1863.

This statement was corroborated by Harris Gaskins, Jesse Hodges, and Joseph S. Morris.

The three witnesses stated, “He was on or about the 15th day of Oct. 1863 killed by his own men for leaving his own company & joining the Artillery in the Western Army.  he was brought back from Jackson Mississippi and shot by Court Martial in Northern Georgia  witnesses state further, that E. J. Chapman was in a cavalry co in Mississippi when he was brought back, court martialed and killed.”

Later newspaper accounts of Old Yaller, Elbert J. Chapman, added the following:

“During the  administration of Governor Atkinson  Hon. F. M. Shaw, who was a member of the Legislature, saw in person the Governor and our Pension Commissioner, Mr. Lindsey, in regard to Mrs. Chapman drawing a pension, which had been rejected because her husband was a deserter. The fact that he only quit one command and went to another, that he had, in fact, deserted neither his flag nor his country, but was serving both faithfully and well when found in Canton, did not change the conclusion reached by the Pension Commissioner, and Mr. Shaw’s efforts to secure her a pension were in vain. She was an invalid and living in poverty.”

NOTE: The F.M. Shaw referred to above is usually known as F.M. Shaw, Jr.  to distinguish him from the Francis Marion Shaw who lived at Ray City.  F.M. Shaw, Jr. was from the Adel community:

“Francis Marion Shaw, Jr. owned large tracts of land east of Adel, much of which was later deeded to his children. He served in various civic positions, including that of Chairman of the Berrien County Board of Education, County Commissioner for several terms, and state Representative, the latter an office to which he was elected in 1894.”

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