Portrait of Gloria Grissett

Gloria Jane Grissett, the youngest daughter of James and Lillie Grissett, attended Ray City School, Ray City, Berrien County, GA.  Her siblings, Jimmy Grissett, Anna Martha Grissett, Elinor Grissett, and Stephen Grissett, all were students at Ray City School.

1949 Gloria Grissett, second grade, Ray City School, GA

1949 Gloria Grissett, second grade, Ray City School, GA.

1949 Gloria Grissett, seventh grade, Ray City School, GA.

1949 Gloria Grissett, seventh grade, Ray City School, GA.

In 1960 and 1961, Gloria Jane Grissett attended Valdosta State College. In those years her Ray City classmates at Valdosta State College included Julia Gretchen Schroer, Alva Jo Lindsey, Nell Sangster and Huey Perry Barker.

Gloria Jane Grissett of Ray City, GA. 1960 freshman at Valdosta State College.

Gloria Jane Grissett of Ray City, GA. 1960 freshman at Valdosta State College.

 

Gloria Jane Grissett of Ray City, GA. 1961 sophomore at Valdosta State College.

Gloria Jane Grissett of Ray City, GA. 1961 sophomore at Valdosta State College.

Gloria Jane Grissett, Ray City, GA

Gloria Jane Grissett, Ray City, GA. Image source: Valdosta State University http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en_US

Gloria Jane Grissett at Valdosta State University, 1961 Image source: Valdosta State University http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en_US

Gloria Jane Grissett at Valdosta State University, 1961 Image source: Valdosta State University http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en_US

Gloria Jane Grissett at Valdosta State University, 1961 Image source: Valdosta State University http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en_US

Gloria Jane Grissett at Valdosta State University, 1961 Image source: Valdosta State University http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en_US

 

Gloria Grissett of Ray City, GA, 1963, University of Georgia

Gloria Grissett of Ray City, GA, 1963, University of Georgia

Gloria Jane Grissett married Robert McCollum Buntin on July 23, 1966, Ray City, Berrien Co, GA.

Related Posts:

Harry Kenneth Cornelius (1935-2013)

Harry Kenneth Cornelius (1935-2013)

Harry Kenneth Cornelius, Class of 1953, Ray City High School, Ray City, GA

Harry Kenneth Cornelius, Class of 1953, Ray City High School, Ray City, GA

 

Harry Kenneth Cornelius was born at home in Ray City, GA on March 22, 1935.  His father, Shellie Wade Cornelius, was a farmer from Dupont, GA. His mother, Pearl Williams, was from Ray City.   It appears his parents were married about 1922 and owned a home in Lanier County, 586th Georgia Militia District, on the Sirmans and Lakeland Road.  The census of 1930 shows his parents at this location. His mother was a school teacher and his father farmed on his own account, along with his grandfather and uncle.

Sometime in the early 1930s his parents went to Ray City, GA where Harry was born.  By 1935, the family was living at New River, Berrien County, GA. The 1940 census shows by that time they had rented a home near New River, GA on the Nashville Tifton Road, where his father continued to work a farm on his own account.

Sometime after 1940, the family came back to Ray City, where their home was on Possum Creek Road just west of town. Harry, his sister Frankie Cornelius, brothers Junior Cornelius, Shellie Cornelius, Jr., Robert Cornelius,  and their siblings attended the Ray City School.

Harry Cornelius, 1952 Ray City High School junior class photo.

Harry Cornelius, 1951 Ray City High School sophomore class photo.

Harry’s brother Junior Cornelius played for the Ray City Boy’s Basketball team. His mother, Pearl Williams Cornelius was a teacher at the school and his father, Shellie Wade Cornelius, was a bus driver.

† † †

Obituary of Harry Kenneth Cornelius

Harry Kenneth Cornelius, 77 of Nashville, Ga, passed away Monday morning, March 18, 2013 in the Langdale Hospice House in Valdosta, Ga. He was born in Ray City, Ga. at home, March 22, 1935 to the late Shellie W. Sr. and Pearl Williams Cornelius. He was employed as a marketing sales manager with Unisys in Tampa, Fla. Following his retirement, he moved back to the Berrien County, Ga. area-the home of his birth that he loved all his life. He enjoyed golfing and running as often as he could, and working on the family farm with his brother Junior Cornelius. He also served faithfully in the United States Army for two years, and was a member of the Ray City United Methodist Church. Along with his parents he was also preceded in death by a brother Robert Cornelius.. Survivors Include his wife, Joanna Cornelius of Nashville, Ga.; son and daughter-in-law, Ken and Carol A. Cornelius, New Port Richie, Fla.; daughter and son-in-law, Karla and Ted Hale, Bradenton, Fla.; granddaughter, Amanda Legorete, New Port Richie, Fla.; granddaughter, Wendy Legorete, New Port Richie, Fla.; granddaughter, Kasey Hale, Bradenton, Fla.; grandson, Sean Hale, Bradenton, Fla.; brother, Shellie W. Cornelius Jr., Nashville, Ga.; sister and brother-in-law, Frances and Herman Carner, Tampa, Fla.. Funeral services will be held Thursday, March 21, 2013 at 11 a.m. in the Ray City United Methodist Church with burial to follow in Beaver Dam Cemetery in Ray City, Ga. The family will receive friends at the funeral home between 5-7 p.m. Wednesday, March 20, 2013 in the Lakeland Funeral Home. Sympathy may be expressed online at http://www.musicfuneralservices.com . Mr. Cornelius will be placed in the Church one hour prior to services on Thursday. – Music Funeral Services of Lakeland, Ga.

Grave of Harry Kenneth Cornelius, Beaver Dam Cemetery Ray City, GA. Image source: Ed Hightower

Related Posts:

John Milton Guilliams, Dean of Faculty, South Georgia Normal College

When South Georgia State Normal College (Valdosta State University) first opened its doors in1913, the faculty were under the supervision of John Milton Guilliams, Dean of Faculty.

John Milton Guilliams, first Dean of Faculty at South Georgia Normal College (Valdosta State University).

John Milton Guilliams, first Dean of Faculty at South Georgia Normal College (Valdosta State University).

John Milton Guilliams
Central Normal College, A.B. Holbrook Normal College, A.M.  Teacher in Normal Schools in Illinois, Kansas, Florida and Tennessee. Founder of Jasper Normal Institute. Superintendent East Florida Military Seminary. Professor in Western Kentucky State Normal School. Superintendent City Schools of St. Petersburg, Florida. Institute lecturer in a number of states.

South Georgia State Normal College…“was given complete liberty to develop in any way that seems best to the Board of Trustees. At the first meeting of the Board after the school was financed, it was decided that the best interests of the State could be served by restricting the institution, for the present at least, to the higher education of young women. The College is therefore an institution of collegiate rank, providing both general and special training for the young women of the State.”

Among the inaugural year attendees of South Georgia State Normal College were young women from Berrien County; Myrtle Tyson, Clyde Woodard, Lillian Allen, Bessie Griffin, Effie Patten, Olive Peters, Minnie Belle Carter, Ethel Schnauss, Alma Tyson, Ella Parr, M. T. Lewis, and C. J. Knight.

1913 Spring dress uniform of the ladies of South Georgia State Normal College (Valdosta State University).

1913 Spring dress uniform of the ladies of South Georgia State Normal College (Valdosta State University).

There is more of culture for a Georgia girl in the study of …the tomato, than in the study of the rarest orchid of the greenhouse. – 1914 Bulletin of The South Georgia State Normal College

First building constructed on the campus of South Georgia State Normal College (now Valdosta State University).

First building constructed on the campus of South Georgia State Normal College (now Valdosta State University).

 

Related Posts

Boyette Sisters at Georgia State Womens College

Bessie Griffin Bazemore

Anna Martha Grissett at Georgia State Womans College

Ray City School, Class of 1949

Ray City School, Class of 1949

Special Thanks to Chris Clements for sharing Ray City School records.

Yearbook portrait of Winona Williams, Ray City School, Class of 1949, Class President

Winona Williams, Ray City School, Class of 1949, Class President; Ray City Girls Athletic  Club; 4-H Club; Girls Basketball Team; Yearbook staff; Senior Superlative: Best Athlete.

 

Yearbook portrait Talton Rouse, Ray City School, Class of 1949, Vice President

Talton Rouse, Ray City School, Class of 1949, Vice President; Basketball Team; Yearbook Staff.

 

Yearbook portrait, Jean Studstill, Ray City School, Class of 1949, Treasurer

Jean Studstill, Ray City School, Class of 1949, Class Treasurer; Ray City Girls Athletic Club; Senior Superlative: Prettiest Girl; Yearbook Staff; Girls Basketball Team

 

Yearbook portrait Murray Comer, Ray City School, Class of 1949

Murray Comer, Ray City School, Class of 1949. Basketball Team; Senior Superlative: Most Bashful; Yearbook Athletics Editor.  Later attended Valdosta State College and the University of Georgia.

Yearbook portrait Carey Register, Ray City School, Class of 1949

Carey Register, Ray City School, Class of 1949; Senior Superlative: Most Likely To Succeed; Yearbook Staff: Editor-in-Chief;

 

Helen Wood, Ray City School, Class of 1949

Helen Wood, Ray City School, Class of 1949. Ray City Girls Athletic Club; Yearbook: Assistant Editor.

 

Yearbook portrait Charles Scarbrough, Ray City School, Class of 1949

Charles Scarbrough, Ray City School, Class of 1949. Basketball Team; Yearbook Staff.

 

Yearbook portrait Thomas J. Studstill, Ray City School, Class of 1949

Thomas J. Studstill, Ray City School, Class of 1949. Senior Superlative: Best All-Round; Yearbook Staff;

 

Yearbook portrait Robert Whitehead, Ray City School, Class of 1949

Robert Whitehead, Ray City School, Class of 1949; Senior Superlative: Most Handsome Boy; Yearbook Staff.

 

Yearbook portrait Robert D. Conner, Ray City School, Class of 1949

Robert D. Conner, Ray City School, Class of 1949. Basketball Team; Senior Superlative: Most Intelligent; Yearbook Staff: Business Manager.

 

Yearbook photos Class of 1949, Ray City High School, Ray City, GA

Class of 1949, Ray City High School, Ray City, GA

 

 

1949 Ray City School

1949 Ray City School

 

Ray City High School yearbook dedication, Class of 1949

Ray City High School yearbook dedication, Class of 1949

 

Ray City School Class of 1949 Superlatives

 

Ray City School, Class of 1949 ~Class Prophecy

Ray City School, Class of 1949 ~Class Prophecy

Ray City School, Class of 1949 ~Class Prophecy, pg 2

Ray City School, Class of 1949 ~Class Prophecy, pg 2

Ray City School Class of 1949 ~ Class Will

Ray City School Class of 1949 ~ Class Will

Ray City School Class of 1949 ~ Class Will, pg 2

Ray City School Class of 1949 ~ Class Will, pg 2

 

Related Posts

Spanish-American War Vet Rests at Ray City, GA

Spanish American War

Does anyone remember the final resting place of Ben Howard?  When the young Spanish-American War veteran died at Ray’s Mill Pond in 1900, the citizens of Ray’s Mill, GA paid their respects.

Other Spanish-American War veterans of Berrien County, GA included Aaron Cook, Luther L. Hallman, William A. Knight, Samuel Z. T. Lipham, Walter A. Griner, Carl R. O’Quinn, Pythias D. Yapp, Henry C. McLendon, Charles A. Courson, George C. Flowers, Zachary T. Hester, Jr., W. Dutchman Stephens, and James L. Jordan.

Tifton Gazette
April 27, 1900

Found Dead Is His Boat.
The body of Ben Howard, a young white man, was found in a boat in the bottom of Ray’s mill pond last Saturday. The body had been there for two days or more, but the tragedy was kept a secret by the fact that the boat was a leaky vessel and had sunk to the bottom of the pond, carrying the body down with it. It is not known whether the young man was dead when the boat sunk or not, though it is thought that he had wounded himself by the accidental discharge of his gun while coming out of a tree, from which be had been shooting at fish in the water. The weapon was found at the foot of the tree and one barrel of it had been discharged. The boat was tied to the tree and the body either fell in it, or the wounded man managed to get to it.
Then the boat drifted out in the pond probably fifty yards and sunk to the bottom, the supposition being that Howard’s death was instantaneous, or else he was too badly wounded to manage the boat. A search for him lasted two days.
The burial services were conducted at Beaver Dam on Sunday and a large crowd attended them. Young Howard was a soldier in the war with Spain and did service in Cuba. —Valdosta Times.

 

Tifton Gazette, April 27, 1900 clipping of the death of Ben Howard at Ray's Mill Pond.

Tifton Gazette, April 27, 1900 clipping of the death of Ben Howard at Ray’s Mill Pond.

Related Posts:

South Georgia State Normal College For Young Ladies

In 1913, South Georgia State Normal College opened at Valdosta, GA. The school became Georgia State Woman’s College in 1922 , Valdosta State College in 1950, and Valdosta State University in 1993.

 

ANNOUNCEMENT

1913

SOUTH GEORGIA

STATE

NORMAL COLLEGE

For Young Ladies

VALDOSTA, GEORGIA

 

ARCHITECT’S DRAWING OF FIRST BUILDING.

Architectural rendering of the first building to be built on the campus of the South Georgia State Normal College, Valdosta, GA

Architectural rendering of the first building to be built on the campus of the South Georgia State Normal College, Valdosta, GA

 

The Board of Trustees

Hon. W. S. West, Chr.               Valdosta, Ga.
Hon. W. L, Converse, Sect.       Valdosta, Ga.
Hon. C. R. Ashley, Treas.           Valdosta, Ga.
Hon. A. C Ward, Jr.                   Douglas, Ga.
Hon. E. H. Beck                        Barney, Ga.
Hon H. M. Mcintosh                Albany, Ga.
Dr. R. C. Woodard                   Adel, Ga.
Hon. H. H. Tift                         Tifton, Ga.
Hon. J. Hansell Merrill             Thomasville, Ga.

EX OFFICIO

Dr. D. C. Barrow, Chancellor of the University of Georgia Athens, Ga.

Hon. M. L. Brittain, State Superintendent
of Schools Atlanta, Ga.

The Faculty

The President
Mr R. H. Powell

Professor of Pedagogy and History of Education.
Mr. J. M. Guilliams

Superintendent of the Training School
Miss Lillian Rule

Professor of Mathematics and Physics
Mr. J. F. Wood

Professor of English and History
Mr. W. J. Bradley

Professor of Domestic Science and Arts
Miss M. Katherine Christian

Director of Agriculture and Manager of the
Boarding Department
Mr. J. E. Creel

Associate Professor of English and History
Miss Elizabeth McElreath

Teacher of Art and Manual Training
Miss Frances Ruth Carpenter

The Faculty (Continued)

Teacher of Nature Study and Geography
Miss Alice Pritchard

Teacher of School Music
To be elected

Assistant Teacher in English and Latin
Miss Nell E. Brimberry

Training Teacher, Third and Fifth Grades
To be elected

Training Teacher, 1st Grade,
To be elected

Matron
Mrs. R. H. Patterson

Secretary and Bookkeeper
Mr. W. P. Yarbrough

Introductory

On Thursday, January the Second, 1913, the South Georgia State Normal College will open for its first term’s work. The handsome building is nearing completion and will be ready for occupancy. A permanent maintenance fund has been appropriated by the Legislature. A strong faculty is being organized; and every ting is being done to guarantee from the start a normal college of highest efficiency — the equal of any in the South. Though the school opens its first year in January, it is believed that owing to the relatively small classes at first and the consequent greater personal attention, and to the exceptionally high average of training and experience of the faculty it will not be long before the classes are fully abreast of the yearly program of studies.

Location

The school is situated in Valdosta, at one of the most easily accessible points in South Georgia. The campus of sixty acres faces 2,100 feet on Patterson Street, the principal residence street of the city, and occupies a gently sloping hillside, which gives perfect drainage and affords an ideal school site. At the foot of the hill a small stream flows through a natural park of handsome trees, and at the top of the hill is a beautiful grove of virgin pines. The school has a campus of exceptional natural beauty.

Health and Sanitation

Valdosta enjoys an enviable reputation for health. The fall, winter and spring climate (when school is in session) is ideal. The school will be amply supplied with pure artesian water from the city waterworks;
and the sewerage system is of the most modern and thorough design. Every precaution has been taken to protect the health of the students.

The Faculty

The heart of any school is its faculty. The faculty of this school is being very carefully selected, and several members have already been employed. The names of those who have been elected appear at the beginning of these announcements. Most of them are well known in the State, and all are known for exceptional character and ability in their special lines. It is the determination of the Board of Trustees to leave nothing undone to secure for the South Georgia State Normal College as able teachers as are to be found in any school of its kind.

The Course of Study

The charter of the College defines one of the chief functions of the school as being “to prepare teachers for the public schools of Georgia.” The Board frankly accepts this function, and the course of study will be based largely on this purpose.

In grade, the school will extend about two or three years above schools of the rank of our best accredited high schools. Graduates of accredited schools of Group A will be admitted to the Junior year without examination (though with conditions in one or two required subjects); and students from other groups of accredited schools will be graded accordingly. Graduates from most accredited schools will enter the Sophomore Class. All other students will be admitted on examinations and previous records.

As to course of study, the work will be broad and thorough. Besides the professional work necessary to the training of teachers, there will be thorough and vital training in the usual academic studies and in the subjects pertaining to home activities and arts. It is, in a word, the purpose of the school to train for teaching by training for life.

The Building

Before the first brick was laid, a plan was made for all reasonable future development of the school, and prospective buildings are given their positions once for all. The general style of architecture adopted is a very beautiful form of Spanish Mission. As is indicated in the accompanying picture, the light colored walls, the great overhanging roof of rich, red tile, the open terraces, and abundant windows, give great beauty and comfort. The first building to be erected is a combination dormitory and administration building. It will eventually be used entirely for dormitory purposes. It is only two stories high, thus preventing the injury of much climbing of stairs. The rooms are all well ventilated. There is running water, hot and cold, in every room. Ample toilet and bath facilities are conveniently placed. The furniture, though simple, is neat and specially adapted to dormitory purposes. In short, the building is planned on most modern principles, by an architect of very wide and successful experience in school and dormitory building. It is sincerely believed that there is not a better building of its kind in the South.

Home Life

In the dormitory there are thirty bed rooms furnishing accommodations for about 65 students. Most of the rooms, thirteen by fifteen feet, will be occupied by two students. A few rooms, somewhat larger, will be occupied by three. The dining room and kitchen are planned with the same regard for health and comfort as are the bed rooms. The dormitory will be under an experienced matron, who has charge of the girls in all matters of their school-home life. The dining room will be in charge of one who knows the principles of foods and is experienced in providing wholesome and palatable meals.

No pains or expense will be spared to make the home life of the students comfortable, healthy and content.

Arrangements have been made with certain families in the city to take students as boarders; and where students have responsible relatives in the city, they may, with the approval of the president, arrange to board with them. Students in private homes will be required to conform to the same general rules as do those in the dormitory.

The Uniform

All students will be required to wear a uniform. Experts are now at work on the problem of a neat, serviceable, higienic, and economical uniform. Details may be had on request, about December first.

Religious Life

It is a fundamental principle of the school that the public institutions of a Christian State are or ought to be Christian institutions. While the school is wholly undenominational, every incentive will be given to the development of wholesome Christian sentiment and noble Christian character. The religious life of the students will be in every way encouraged. Students will be expected to attend the churches of their own membership or of that of their parent’s choice.

Expenses

Matriculation fee per year $10.00

(This year $5.00.)

Books, Stationery, etc $8.00 to $12.00

Board, Lodging and Laundry in Dormitory, per month $12.00

Clothes, about $35,00

Laboratory and Domestic Science Fees $1.00 to $4.00

The Matriculation fee is payable when the student enters each year.

Books, Stationery, etc., are paid for when purchased.

Of the board and lodging fee, $24.00 is payable January 2nd, and $36.00 March 1st.
Laboratory and Domestic Science fees are payable at the beginning of the course.

Students from other states may be admitted upon payment of $50.00 tuition in addition to the foregoing fees.

What a Student Should Bring With Her.

Each student should bring with her the following articles: Sheets, a blanket, a pillow, pillow cases, a bed spread, towels, napkins, a knife, a fork, a spoon, and such other articles of personal use as she may need.

Each student should also have for the protection of her health and comfort a good umbrella, over shoes, and a warm cloak or rain coat.

The teaspoon and fork should be of solid silver or of good plated ware, and should, if possible, have the student’s initials engraved on them.

Training School

A normal school is as strong as its training school. Care has been taken to place the training school on a sound basis from the start. It has been arranged to open with three grades (1st, 3d, 5th) and to add grades each year until the school is complete. Expert teachers are in charge of the training school, and every care is taken to give the children of the school the very best educational advantages.

A fee of $2.50 per half year is charged for each pupil. This fee is due January 2nd for this school year.

For Further Information, Address

R. H. POWELL, President

Valdosta, Ga.

Application for Admission

_____________ ____ ______________ 1912 ____

(Postoffice and date)

Mr. R. H. Powell,

President South Georgia State Normal College:

I desire to enter my daughter as a student in the South Georgia State Normal College at the opening of the school, January 2nd, 1913.

She agrees to observe the rules and regulations of the institution.

_______________________________________Parent

Please give the following information
—————————————-
Students full name:
________________________________________

Age on January 1st, 1913 _______________

School last attended ___________________

Grade completed ________________________

Graduate of a High School? yes or no ___

Student’s health? good or not __________

Note: Students should, where possible, have the Superintendent or Principal of their school write a confidential letter to the President of this College speaking of the advancement and qualifications of the student. The student should bring with her such diplomas and certificates as she may have received.

Related Posts

 

Causton’s Bluff Part 4: Arrival of the 29th GA Regiment

Berrien Minute Men Arrive at Causton’s Bluff

On the night of April 16, 1862 the Berrien Minute Men, Company D, 29th Georgia Regimen moved to Causton’s Bluff, between Savannah and Tybee Island.   They came along with other companies of the 29th Georgia Regiment to reinforce the 13th Georgia Regiment which had fought an engagement with Federal troops of the 8th Michigan Infantry the evening before on Whitemarsh Island.  Causton’s Bluff was also the site of Camp Stonewall Jackson, the encampment of the 47th Georgia Regiment.

The Berrien Minute Men Company D, under command of John Carroll Lamb, was the second of two companies of that name going forth from Berrien County, GA in 1861.  They had made their campfires most of the previous year at coastal defenses of Georgia, first on Sapelo Island and then around Savannah, GA.

The Berrien Minute Men Company D had been encamped at Camp Tattnall, Savannah, GA and from that vantage point had witnessed the Federal bombardment and recapture of Fort Pulaski by U.S. Army forces from Tybee Island on April 11, 1862, exactly one year to the day from the Confederate seizure of Fort Sumter.  Within the week the Federal forces were probing the Confederate pickets on Whitemarsh Island, prompting the move of the 29th GA Regiment up to Causton’s Bluff.

  1. Causton’s Bluff Part 1: The Key to Savannah
  2. Causton’s Bluff Part 2: Challenge from Tybee
  3. Causton’s Bluff Part 3: War on Whitemarsh Island
  4. Causton’s Bluff Part 4: Arrival of the 29th GA Regiment
  5. Causton’s Bluff Part 5: Tidewater Time

 

Harmon Neal Baldree served with the Berrien Minute Men, Company K, 29th Georgia Regiment. In June, 1862 he was on detached duty as a ferryman at Causton's Bluff on St. Augustine Creek near Savannah, GA

Harmon Neal Baldree served with the Berrien Minute Men, Company D (K), 29th Georgia Regiment at Causton’s Bluff near Savannah, GA. In June, 1862 he went on detached duty as a ferryman on St. Augustine Creek at Causton’s Bluff

The Berrien Minute Men had arrived at Causton’s Bluff in the middle of the night on August 16th, having been aroused by an alert and summoned as reinforcements. After a quick march in darkness they took up a position at the bluff, only to find by morning it was to be their new encampment. Their equipment was sent down the next day.  Berrien Minute Men Company D (K) and most of the other companies of the 29th Regiment spent May of 1862 at Causton’s Bluff.  The Ocklocknee Light Infantry, Company E, was at Debtford Plantation adjacent to Causton’s Bluff.  Berrien Minute Men Company C (G) continued to serve at Battery Lawton on the Savannah River.

In some ways, the arrival of the Berrien Minute Men must have been similar to the experience described by Walter Augustus Clark upon his arrival at Thunderbolt battery, overlooking the marsh just south of Causton’s Bluff:

My earliest recollections of Thunderbolt is associated with a fruitless effort to mix turpentine soap and salt water. We had reached the place tired and dusty and dirty. As soon as the ranks were broken, the boys divested themselves of their clothing and soaping their bodies thoroughly plunged into the salt water for a bath. The result may be imagined. The dirt and dust accumulated in streaks, which no amount of scrubbing could dislodge for it stuck closer than a postage stamp.

The 29th Regiment’s move to Causton’s Bluff may have presented a welcome distraction to Lieutenant Thomas J. Perry of the Berry Light Infantry.   At Camp Wilson, a previous encampment of the 29th Regiment, Lt. Perry had gotten into a Regimental Feud with an officer of the 25th Georgia Regiment, publicly condemning gambling and loose discipline among the men of the 25th Regiment. Lieutenant W.P.M. Ashley of 25th Regiment had Perry hauled before a military tribunal and courtmartialed.  Lieutenant Perry was still awaiting the sentencing of the court. In early May, he was relieved to learn that the sentence from his court martial was a mild one: a reprimand from the Colonel and one week’s suspension. Ready to get on with the business of the regiment, Perry wrote:

Causton’s Bluff, near Savannah, GA
May 8, 1862

Our Regiment is on picket duty on Oakland [Oatland] and Whitmarsh Island [Whitemarsh Island], in connection with the 13th Regiment and 11th Battalion. We have had no fighting yet, though we are sometimes in shooting distance of the Yankees…There are no prospects of a fight here soon…The weather is remarkably pleasant. Days moderately warm and nights cool. The sea breeze is delightful. There is but a few cases of sickness in our company. It is much more healthy here than our up country friends would suppose. We have good water, but not so good as you have in Floyd [County]. 

Perry’s assessment of the healthfulness of the camp at Causton’s Bluff would turn out to be overly optimistic. The 29th Georgia Regiment had yet to face the oppressive heat and pestilence of summer on the marsh. The men at Causton’s Bluff would suffer with mosquitoes, fleas, sandflies,  fever, malaria, measles, tonsillitis, mumps,  wounds, typhus, dysentery, pneumonia, tuberculosis, syphilis, hepatitis, and rheumatism.

At Thunderbolt Battery, Walter Augustus Clark wrote further of summer conditions on the marsh:

We fought and bled, it is true, but not on the firing line. The foes that troubled us most, were the fleas and sand flies and mosquitoes that infested that section. They never failed to open the spring campaign promptly and from their attacks by night and day no vigilance on the picket line could furnish even slight immunity. If the old time practice of venesection as a therapeutic agent was correct in theory our hygienic condition ought to have been comparatively perfect. During the “flea season” it was not an unusual occurrence for the boys after fruitless efforts to reach the land of dreams, to rise from their couches, divest themselves of their hickory shirts and break the silence of the midnight air by vigorously threshing them against a convenient tree in the hope of finding temporary “surcease of sorrow” from this ever-present affliction. It was said that if a handfull of sand were picked up half of it would jump away. I can not vouch for the absolute correctness of this statement, but I do know that I killed, by actual count, one hundred and twenty fleas in a single blanket on which I had slept the preceding night and I can not recall that the morning was specially favorable for that species of game either. I remember further that as we had in camp no “Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals,” I corked up an average specimen of these insects to see how long he would live without his daily rations. At the end of two weeks he had grown a trifle thin, but was still a very lively corpse. But these were not the only “ills, that made calamity of so long a life,” for as Moore might have said, if his environment had been different,

“Oft in the stilly night,
Ere slumber’s chain had bound me,
I felt the awful bite
Of ‘skeeters buzzing ’round me “

Their bills were presented on the first day of the day of the month and, unfortunately, on every other
day. At our picket stations on Wilmington and Whitemarsh Islands and at the “Spindles” on the river where the young alligators amused themselves by crawling up on the bank and stealing our rations, there was a larger variety known as gallinippers, from whose attacks the folds of a blanket thrown over our faces was not full protection.

But there were still others. On dress parade in the afternoons, while the regiment was standing at “parade rest” and no soldier was allowed to move hand or foot until Richter’s band, playing Capt. Sheppards Quick stephad completed its daily tramp to the left of the line and back to its position on the right, the sandflies seemed to be aware of our helplessness and “in prejudice of good order and military discipline” were especially vicious in their attack upon every exposed part of our anatomy Capt. C. W Howard, I remember, was accustomed to fill his ears with cotton as a partial protection. I have seen Charlie Goetchius, while on the officers’ line in front of the regiment, squirm and shiver in such apparent agony that the veins in his neck seemed ready to burst. Neither whistling minies, nor shrieking shells, nor forced marches with no meal in the barrel nor oil in the cruse ever seemed to disturb his equanimity in the slightest degree. Quietly and modestly and bravely he met them all. But the sandfly brigade was a little too much for him. In addition to these discomforts, the salt water marsh, near which we were camped, never failed to produce a full crop of chills and fever… Of the one hundred and fifteen men in our ranks only three escaped an attack of this disease. The writer was fortunately one of the three. One man had fifty-three chills before a furlough was allowed him. Quinine was scarce and boneset tea and flannel bandages saturated with turpentine were used as substitutes. Whiskey was sometimes issued as a preventative. In pursuance of a resolution formed on entering the service I never tasted the whiskey and as soon as my habit on this line became known, I was not subjected to the trouble of looking up applicants for the extra ration.

At Causton’s Bluff in May, 1862 Joel J. Parrish, Berrien Minute Men,  went out on sick furlough; despite his absence he was promoted to Sergeant on May 13th.  Charles R. Oliver, Alapaha Guards, was absent sick, but returned and in August was on special duty as a nurse; he later deserted. Reuben Dollar and Isaac B. Stroud, Berry Infantry, came down sick and went home. Dollar was sent to the convalescent camp at Springfield, GA & never returned to the unit. John G. Stroud and John L. Tanner, Berry Infantry, were at hospital in Augusta, GA.  James Sellars, 17th Patriots, contracted measles and was sent to Guyton Hospital at Whitesville, GA. On May 11, 1862, Isaac Watson, Thomas Volunteers, was certified disabled at Causton’s Bluff because of fever and rheumatism. On May 12, 1862,  Joseph N. Singletary, 17th Patriots, died at Screvens Ferry, and George W. Fletcher, Alapaha Guards, was sent home with an “indolent ulcer” on his right leg that went clear down to the bone.   Richard M. Aycock, Berry Infantry, was discharged on May 14, by reason of a severe cut across his foot with an axe which he received before he came into the service.  W. E. Carter, Thomas Volunteers, died of pneumonia May 15, 1862. Daniel M. Banks, Berry Infantry, got sick and was sent to Savannah where he died of fever May 15, 1862. William Ferris, Berry Infantry, on May 15 was at Augusta and died of fever.

Letter from Headquarters of the 29th Georgia Regiment, Causton's Bluff, Savannah, GA supporting discharge of T. S. Gregory on account of consumption. Written May 17, 1862 by Captain, George P. Burch, Thomas Volunteers.

Letter from Headquarters of the 29th Georgia Regiment, Causton’s Bluff, Savannah, GA supporting discharge of T. S. Gregory on account of consumption. Written May 17, 1862 by Captain, George P. Burch, Thomas Volunteers.

James H. Archer, Thomasville Guards, got sick and went home; he died of typhoid dysentery in his mother’s house on May 18, 1862. On May 20, 1862, Frederick Green Thompson, 17th Patriots, died of pneumonia at Screvens Ferry. T.S. Gregory, Thomas Volunteers, who being too weakened and impaired for duty had been serving as a nurse for the previous two months, was discharged at Causton’s Bluff on May 21, 1862 with consumption. James Jones, Alapaha Guards, was discharged May 22, 1862 on account of chronic nephritis. Wesley A. Pugh, Ocklochnee Light Infantry was discharged May 23, 1862 with tertiary syphilis, chronic rheumatism, and chronic hepatitis. On May 24, Lewis J. Collins, Thomas Volunteers, died of typhoid fever at Causton’s Bluff. Philip Schiff, 4th corporal of the Thomasville Guards, 29th GA Regiment, was found physically unfit for duty and discharged on May 26, 1862. Robert A. McKinnon, Ocklochnee Light Infantry, died of typhoid fever on May 27,1862. John E. Dickey , Ochlocknee Light Infantry, got sick in May, went to the hospital and never returned. On May 28, 1862, Waldo McCranie, Berrien Minute Men, was discharged on account of rheumatism; he reenlisted in 1863. On May 29, 1862 Cpl. R. M. Hancock, Thomas Volunteers, died of typhoid fever at Causton’s Bluff. James N. Winn, Ocklochnee Light Infantry was sick at hospital in Savannah; the following month he furnished John E. Bryan as a substitute and received a discharge. Jasper M. Luke, Berrien Minute Men, was discharged about this time with chronic rheumatism. Matthew Godwin, Thomas Volunteers was discharged on account of tuberculosis on May 31, 1862 – the regimental assistant surgeon was of the opinion Godwin suffered from “a hereditary taint in his blood” since his mother also had tuberculosis.

On May 11, 1862, the Federals made another showing on Whitemarsh Island opposite Causton’s Bluff:

Savannah Republican

More Prisoners. – Our pickets on the marsh opposite Causton’s Bluff captured another respectable batch of Yankee Prisoners yesterday afternoon [May 11, 1862], and without firing a gun.
         It seems two detachments were sent out from the 13th Georgia, and stationed in the marsh near Augustine creek. During the afternoon a boat was heard coming from towards Wilmington, when the nearest party threw themselves down in the marsh and awaited its arrival opposite them. Unconscious of danger, the Federals rowed up to within a few yards of the pickets, when the latter suddenly sprang to their feet and ordered a surrender. Taken by surprise, and unarmed, the entire party, numbering fifteen, gave up and came ashore. They were taken in custody by Colonel [Marcellus] Douglass and brought to town for safe keeping.
         The prisoners are fifteen in number – six officers, good looking, well dressed men, and the remainder seamen, all from the steamer Sumter, stationed off Wilmington. They were doubtless reconnoitering, but say they were bound for Fort Pulaski, on a trip of pleasure. The capturing party consisted of only four.

Federal gunboats periodically challenged the Confederate batteries, trying to navigate through the marshes into St. Augustine Creek. Cannon fire from the batteries overlooking Whitemarsh Island was easily heard by the men of the Berrien Light Infantry, Company I, 50th Georgia Regiment encamped some three miles west near Fort Brown. On May 18, 1862 Sergeant Ezekiel Parrish of the Berrien Light Infantry wrote of hearing the cannonade of Thunderbolt Battery:

May 18, 1862, Savannah, GA

We heard some heavy firing of cannon last night about 9 o’clock. There was ten or fifteen fired in quick succession and then at intervals of ten or fifteen minutes I heard some four of five of the heaviest guns I ever heard in my life. Some thought the fight had commenced but up to this time all is quiet here as far as regards a general engagement with the common enemy. I heard that the shooting we heard was at Thunderbolt battery firing at one of the enemy’s gunboats that was trying to poke by our batteries and reports say she made the best of her way back to her own quarter.

Confederate Picket Station.  The Berrien Minute Men, and the 29th Georgia Regiment were stationed at the post on Causton's Bluff  and did picket duty on Whitemarsh Island and at Caper's Battery.

Confederate Picket Station.  The Berrien Minute Men, and the 29th Georgia Regiment were stationed at the post on Causton’s Bluff  and did picket duty on Whitemarsh Island and at Caper’s Battery.

Men from Causton’s bluff were constantly rotated on picket duty or patrolling on Oatland and Whitemarsh Island and the surrounding creeks.  A ferry was kept at a dock below the bluff to move the men across St. Augustine Creek. In June, 1862, Pvt Harmon N. Baldree, Berrien Minute Men, and Pvt Mitchell Griffin, Thomas Volunteers, were among the men on detached duty as ferrymen. Lieutenant Thomas J. Perry of the Berry Light Infantry wrote on May 20,

Causton’s Bluff, Near Savannah, Ga.

May 20, 1862

Since my last letter we have lost, by death, two more member of our company – Daniel M. Banks and W. N. Farris, the former died in the city at St. John’s Hospital, the latter in the Augusta Hospital. This makes four we have lost. The entire company deeply sympathise with the friends and relatives of each, although they did not die on the battlefield, in the defense of their homes and firesides, yet they fill a soldier’s grave and are justly entitled to the Honor as tho’ they did, for they have been found in the line of battle more than once, for the purpose of meeting the enemy in a deadly conflict. When sickness did not prevent, they were true and trusty.
There is but few on the sick list at present, none seriously so. Our duties are laborious at present. Our company have to go on the Island every four days, in addition to working on the fortifications.
While on the island today we saw a large balloon go up from Fort Pulaski, several times, and remain up several minutes at a time.
There does not seem to be any prospect of a fight here soon, if ever. If there is any it will doubtless be a river fight, and if we don’t whip the fight, it will not be because we had not time to prepare for it.
Recruits are coming in rapidly to the different companies, swelling their ranks to a respectable size.
Floyd.

 

In June, 1862, sickness at Causton’s Bluff continued to take a toll on the effectiveness of the 29th Georgia Regiment.  Jacob Marks and John T. Barker of the Berrien Minute Men were among many who were absent sick.  Isaac Baldree, Berrien Minute Men, was at the general hospital at Guyton and J.S. Massey, Thomasville Guards, was “absent sick in hospital”; both were discharged by civil authority in August. William W. Spencer, Captain of the Ocklochnee Light Infantry, who had been on station at Camp Mackey went on sick furlough. Abel A. Braswell, Seventeenth Patriots, went on sick furlough and was discharged by civil authority in September. John W. Callahan, Berry Infantry, was furloughed on sick leave and was absent sick for seven months. William Shores, Berry Infantry, was absent sick in June and July. John Johnston, 1st Lt of the Stephens Volunteers was sick at Causton’s Bluff, then under arrest for two months before going back on the sick roll; in December, 1862, he was detailed as an enrolling officer. Isaac H. Carter, 17th Patriots, went on sick leave in June and died of disease October 10, 1862. Council Singletary, 17th Patriots, was on sick furlough. Benjamin P. Singletary, Thomas Volunteers, was absent sick, then detailed to work in the regimental hospital. Asa C. Crowe, Stephens Volunteers, discharged with disability at Causton’s Bluff, June 3, 1862 because of an old accidental gunshot wound to his left hand.  On June 9, 1862, Corporal John A. Money, an over-age soldier of the Berrien Minute Men, was discharged at Causton’s Bluff, being disabled by frequent attacks of intermittent fever. Lt Robert Thomas Johnson, Thomas Volunteers, went home sick from Causton’s Bluff on June 10 and Lt. John Green Lindsey, Seventeenth Patriots, died of disease that same day.  Sgt Sherod S. Little, Ocklochnee Light Infantry, was discharged for disability on June 22, 1862 after suffering an acute attack of rheumatism and pericarditis. William G. Price Ocklochnee Light Infantry, reported as a substitute for Michael H. Young, but was detailed June 26, 1862 as a tailor. William Cowart, Berrien Minute Men, enlisted November 18, 1861 and was discharged for disability on June 26, 1862; Captain J. D. Knight said he has “been unfit for duty two thirds of the time since he has been in the service, has had measles, tonciliatus, mumps, fever, and seems to have indication of dropsey.” Tim G. Whiddon, Thomas Volunteers went to St. John’s Hospital, Savannah and died of typhoid fever on June 26, 1862. Daniel B. Lammons, Ocklochnee Light Infantry, went on sick leave in June and died of typhoid fever in Thomas County on the 4th of July, 1862. On June 30, 1862, Samuel Staten, Alapaha Guards, was reported sick in an Augusta, GA hospital.

On June 11th, 1862 the Chatham Artillery joined the garrison at Causton’s Bluff, having moved from their previous station at Camp Hardee on Cedar Hammock. (A detachment of the Chatham Artillery had been captured at the fall of Fort Pulaski.) The camp of the Chatham Artillery at Causton’s bluff was named Camp Stonewall Jackson.  A Historical Sketch of the Chatham Artillery provides a complete roster of the company on arrival at the bluff and describes the conditions of the encampment:

Situated as was the camp in the vicinity of the rice fields, low grounds, and brackish marshes of the Savannah river, and therefore in the midst of a truly malarial region, the men suffered so generally and so severely from fevers, that at one time there were scarcely cannoneers enough in camp to perform guard duty, or drivers to attend to stable duties. Several deaths occurred…

Junior 1st Lieutenant John E. Wheaton wrote:

June 11th – Vacated the camp at Cedar Hammock and camped at Causton’s Bluff, in company with a brigade of infantry in command of Col. C.C. Wilson. The guard and picket duty there was severe, and the situation one of the most unhealthy in Chatham county. A large number of the men were made sick. Privates Wylly J. Cash and James Rafferty died in hospital at Savannah, August 7th, and Private W. H. Elliot at Cartersville, Ga., August 12th.  – Reminiscences of the Chatham Artillery during the war 1861-1865 

Regimental returns for July 1862 from the Berrien Minute Men Company D are sparse, but it seems the health of the company suffered as much as any at Causton’s Bluff. On July 27, 1862 Sergeant John W. Hagan wrote, “The company is very sickly & dose not seem to improve. The health of the troops at this post is very bad. We have had 3 deaths in 24 hours & others expecting to die evry day.”  That month, Stephen Roberts and Guilford Tomlinson, Alapaha Guards, were at a convalescent camp; Roberts died of pneumonia the following month at the Springfield convalescent camp. Lt. Thomas J. Perry, Berry Infantry, was absent sick, but returned in August. James Rhodes, Berry Infantry, went to hospital and was furloughed home to recover; he was back in November, detailed as a ferryman. James W. Ferris, Berry Infantry, was sent to Springfield convalescent camp, then to hospital and eventually deserted. Thomas Allen and  George W. Kirk, Stephens Volunteers, were at convalescent camp; Allen spent the rest of the year in the hospital or furloughed sick.  Merritt A. Chandler, Stephens Volunteers, was sent to the hospital at Whitesville, GA then was in and out of hospitals until February, 1863, when he was diagnosed with “Tertian Fever,” a type of malaria in which the fever spikes every three days. Calvin H. Kytle, Stephens Volunteers, went to the hospital in Savannah. Nathaniel Bryan, Seventeenth Patriots, went on sick furlough. John D. Hires, Wiliam F. Southwell, Lt William Pendarvis, Moses W. Spence, James H. Hodges John T. Strickland, William Thornton and William F. Southwell, Georgia Foresters, were sick in the hospital. Hodges would be out for four months, Strickland six months, Southwell and Thornton never returned. Spence was detailed as a nurse. Randall Phinnie, Thomas Volunteers, was absent sick. F. M. Rawls and J. S. Rawls went to the convalescent camp. F.M. Rawls headed home without leave and died December 9 in Thomas County. J. S. Rawls was sent to Springfield and never returned. James W. Farris, Berry Infantry, went to a convalescent camp and was out five months. Toliver Trapp, Berry Infantry, was at convalescent camp; he had been working as a nurse in the Savannah hospital. Reuben R. Pyles, 17th Patriots, was at the Convalescent camp. Barry Scoggins, 17th Patriots was under arrest at Oglethorpe Barracks, Savannah; he escaped in November 1862. On July 2, 1862, John Muller reported as a substitute for John G. Fondren and deserted the same day. Hayes Singletary, who had enlisted in the 17th Patriots in May, died of pneumonia on July 3, 1862 at Causton’s Bluff. On the 4th of July, 1862, James Sellars, 17th Patriots, died of pneumonia at Guyton Hospital. On July 10, John Tomlinson, Alapaha Guards, furnished a substitute to serve in his place. J. Peacock, 17th Patriots, died of fever, July 10, 1862. On July ll, 1862, Lewis Ebbinger, who worked in the company commissary of the Ocklochnee Light infantry, died of congestive chill. J. Kilby Carroll was discharged at Causton’s Bluff on July 16, 1862 as “incapable of performing the duties of a soldier because of chronic ulceration of the leg“; he later was sent to Ocmulgee Hospital, Macon, GA and worked in the Confederate States Laboratory, the center of Confederate States Ordnance testing and production. Patrick W. McKinnon, Ocklochnee Light Infantry, died of typhoid fever July 18, 1862. William J. McKinnon, Ocklochnee Light Infantry, went to a hospital at Whitesville, GA; he died August 28th, 1862. B.F. Fudge, Thomasville Guards, was at a convalescent camp; he was discharged in August for being over age. Thirty-six-year-old Jarrod Johnson, who joined at Darrien, GA, had been incapacitated by rheumatism every single day of his enlistment and was discharged on certificate of disability on July 19, 1862. On July 22, 1862 Dempsey Griffin, Thomas Volunteers, died of pneumonia at Causton’s Bluff. G. W. Martin, Thomasville Guards, caught Typhoid pneumonia and received a certificate of disability for discharge at Causton’s Bluff, July 23, 1862. That same day, July 23, Cpl. William T. Connally and Wilber W. Williams, Stephens Volunteers, and Duncan R. McIntosh, 17th Patriots, died of fever in Savannah. James C. Smith, corporal of the Ochlockonee Light Infantry got sick and was sent to Guyton Hospital at Whitesville, GA where he died of intermittent fever on July 25, 1862. Greenberry Holt, 17th Patriots, enlisted at Causton’s Bluff on May 16 and died of jaundice and fever on July 28, 1862. William Harper and James H. Lester, Thomasville Guards, got sick in July. Harper spent four months in the hospital but eventually returned to the regiment and served until the end of the war. Lester went home and on July 28, 1862 died of typhoid fever.

In August, 1862  Josiah Goode, Stephens Volunteers, went sick to the Savannah hospital and after several months of illness was furloughed home; he died September 14, 1863 of chronic diarrhea. In Stephens Volunteers, Sgt William J.
Poole left camp in August and died of fever in Franklin County, GA on September 16, the same day Sgt Lowrey G. Patterson died of fever at Causton’s Bluff. S. R. Taylor was assigned to duty as a hospital steward; the following month he was discharged, overage.

The Chatham Artillery vacated Causton’s Bluff on August 13, 1862, moving to White Bluff.  The Berrien Minute Men, Company D, 29th Georgia Regiment would remain at Causton’s Bluff through the first week of October.

Nashville High School, Class of 1949

Class of 1949
Nashville High School, Nashville, Berrien County, GA

Doris Burnsed, Nashville High School Class of 1949, Berrien County, GA

Doris Burnsed, Nashville High School Class of 1949, Berrien County, GA

Carroll Dorsey, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Carroll Dorsey (1932-2011), Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Billie Ruth Nix, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Billie Ruth Nix, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Willis Hand, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Willis Hand, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Sarah Byron, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Sarah Byron, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Randel Napier, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Randel Napier, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Rachel Parrish, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Rachel Parrish, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Nanette Register, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Nanette Register, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mary Jo Forehand, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mary Jo Forehand, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mary Jim Fuller, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mary Jim Fuller, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mary Dees, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mary Dees, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Marie Baker, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Marie Baker, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mallie Hancock, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mallie Hancock, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mack Harper, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mack Harper, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Lula Hendry, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Lula Hendry, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Lamar Griffin, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Lamar Griffin, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Kenneth Jones, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Kenneth Jones, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Kathleen Mathis, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Kathleen Mathis, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Geneva Browning, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Geneva Browning, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Bertice Summerlin, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Bertice Summerlin, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Faye Watson, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Faye Watson, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Diane Miley, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Diane Miley, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Billy Vickers, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Billy Vickers, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Alvin Drawdy, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Alvin Drawdy, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Margaret Davis, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Margaret Davis, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Iris Harvey, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Iris Harvey, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Franklin Parrish, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Franklin Parrish, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Jehu Walker, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Jehu Walker, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Christine Collins, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Christine Collins, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Juanita Ewing, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Juanita Ewing, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Patsy Webb, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Patsy Webb, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Annette Partin, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Annette Partin, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Julia Davis, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Julia Davis, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Joe Sizemore, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Joe Sizemore, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Betty Sue Henley, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Betty Sue Henley, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Maxie Cornelius, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Maxie Cornelius, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Homer Lee Forehand, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Homer Lee Forehand, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Bobby, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Bobby, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Betty Rowan, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Betty Rowan, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Related Posts:

Muster Roll of Berrien Minute Men, Co. D, 29th GA Regiment

Berrien Minute Men, Company D, was the second of two companies of men raised in Berrien County, GA during the Civil War.  The campfires of the Berrien Minute Men were made with the 29th Georgia Regiment.

MUSTER ROLL OF
COMPANY D, 29th REGIMENT GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY
(Became Co. K, at reorganization May 7, 1862.)
ARMY OF TENNESSEE C. S. A.
BERRIEN, CLINCH & LOWNDES COUNTIES, GEORGIA
BERRIEN MINUTE MEN

  1. Lamb, John C., Captain October 1, 1861. See Private, enlisted, Co. C.
  2. Staten, James W., 1st Lieutenant November 20, 1861. Retired May 7, 1862. Elected Captain of Staten’s Company, 11th Regiment GA State Guards Cavalry (6 months troops), August 4, 1863. Mustered out, expiration term of service, about February 1864. Appointed on Relief Committee and served in that capacity until close of war.
  3. Parrish, Joel J., 2d Lieutenant November 7, 1861. See 3d Sergeant, Co. C.
  4. Knight, Jonathan D., Jr. 2d Lieutenant November 7, 1861. See Private, enlisted , Co. C.
  5. Knight, William W., 2d Sergeant October 1,1861. Died of chronic diarrhoea at Milltown, GA December 27, 1863.
  6. Hagan, John W., 3d Sergeant October 1, 1861. Captured near Atlanta, GA July 22, 1864. Paroled at Camp Chase, OH and transferred to City Point, VA for exchange, March 4, 1865. Received at Boulware & Cox’s Wharves, James River, VA, March 10-12, 1865. No later record.
  7. Millican, Thomas J., 4th Sergeant October 1, 1861. Discharged by civil authority at Savannah, GA August 19, 1862.
  8. Money, John A., 1st Corporal October 1, 1861. Discharged at Causton’s Bluff, GA June 9, 1862. Enlisted as a Private, enlisted in CO. H, 4th Regiment GA Cavalry (Clinch’s), September 1, 1863. Roll for June 1864, last on file, shows him present. No later record.
  9. Parrish, Henry E., 2d Corporal November 4, 1861. Died of typhoid fever at Lauderdale Springs, MS September 8, 1863.
  10. Knight, Barzilla, 3d Corporal November 4, 1861. Elected Jr. 2d Lieutenant May 7, 1862; 1st Lieutenant May 13, 1862. Killed at Chickamauga, GA September 19, 1863.
  11. Lastinger, Peter C., 4th Corporal October 1, 1861. On special duty at Camp Young December 1862. Paroled at Thomasville, GA May 24, 1865. (Born in Lowndes County, GA in 1834.)
  12. Baldree, Harmon N., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. On detached duty, ferryman at Causton’s Bluff, GA, June 1862. Pension records show he was wounded at Chickamauga, GA September 19, 1863. (Born in Tattnall County, GA in 1840.)
  13. Baldree, James H., Private, enlisted December 21, 1861. Died of pneumonia at Florence, SC January 2, 1863.
  14. Barker, John T., Private, enlisted December 13, 1861. Captured at Nashville, TN December 14, 1864. Released at Camp Douglas, IL June 18, 1865.
  15. Boggs, Ezekiel L., Private, enlisted January 3, 1862. Wounded in right hip at Jonesboro, GA August 31, 1864. Admitted to Ocmulgee Hospital at Macon, GA September 8, 1864, and transferred November 18, 1864, place not given. Pension records show he was in Atlanta, GA hospital, wounded, close of war. (Born in Clarke County, GA in 1842.)
  16. Brown, James J., Private, enlisted December 25, 1861. Died of camp fever at Savannah, GA April 14, 1862.
  17. Browning, Pierre (or Perry), Private. Captured at Franklin, TN December 17, 1864. Forwarded to Camp Chase, OH January 14, 1865, and died there of pneumonia February 12, 1865. Grave #1206, Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery.
  18. Carroll, Wyley F., Private, enlisted September 3, 1862. Captured near Atlanta, GA July 22, 1864. Paroled at Camp Chase, OH and transferred to City Point, VA for exchange, March 4, 1865. Received at Boulware & Cox’s Wharves, James River, VA, March 10-12, 1865. (Born in Alabama in 1837.)
  19. Chapman, Elbert J., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. On furlough December 31, 1861. Absent without leave December 31, 1862. Delivered to headquarters of regiment as a deserter May 30, 1863.  Executed by firing squad.
  20. Clements, John C., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. On sick leave December 31, 1861. Wounded at Jonesboro, GA August 31, 1864. Paroled at Thomasville, GA May 25, 1865.
  21. Couey, Samuel, Private, enlisted 1862. Captured near Nashville, TN December 16, 1864. Released at Camp Douglas, IL June 18, 1865.
  22. Cowart, William, Private, enlisted November 21, 1861. Discharged at Causton’s Bluff, GA June 26, 1862.
  23. Cox, Thomas W., Private, enlisted March 18, 1862. On duty as teamster December 31, 1862. No later record.
  24. Davis, James M., Private, enlisted November 21, 1861. Pension records show he was captured near Atlanta, GA July 22, 1864, and was paroled at Camp Chase, OH March 4, 1865. Furloughed for 60 days at Richmond, VA March 1865. (Born in Greene County, GA November 4, 1845.)
  25. DeLoach, James, Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Wounded through both thighs at Jonesboro, GA August 31, 1864. Admitted to Ocmulgee Hospital at Macon, GA September 6, 1864, and transferred September 7, 1864. No later record. (Born December 25, 1844.)
  26. Duren, Richard, Private, enlisted December 6, 1861. Wounded at Chickamauga, GA September 19, 1863. Admitted to Floyd House & Ocmulgee Hospitals at Macon, GA October 1, 1863, and furloughed for 30 days October 31, 1863. Pension records show he was at home on wounded furlough close of war. (Born in Lowndes County, GA in 1838.)
  27. Finley, Alfred B., Private, enlisted December 25, 1861. Contracted measles and erysipelas in service, which resulted in loss of left eye. Captured near Nashville, TN December 16, 1864. Released at Camp Chase, OH June 12, 1865. (Born in GA January 15, 1840. Died at Nicholls, GA October 18, 1921.)
  28. Funderburk, Isaac C., Pension records show he enlisted October 1863, and surrendered at Greensboro, NC April 26, 1865. (Born in Gwinnett County, GA January 30, 1823.)
  29. Garrett, Benjamin S., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861.
  30. Gaskins, Harrison, Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Pension records show he was wounded in both feet at Jonesboro, GA August 31, 1864, and furloughed for 60 days. Unable to return to command. (Born in GA)
  31. Giddens, Hardeman, Private, enlisted November 4, 1861. On extra duty as mail carrier October 31, 1862. On special duty at Camp Young December 31, 1862. No later record.
  32. Giddens, Isbin B., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Roll for December 31, 1861, last on file, shows him present. No later record.
  33. Giddens, John, Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Died at Savannah, GA September 19, 1862.
  34. Giddens, John W., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Died of camp fever at Savannah, GA April 2, 1862.
  35. Giddens, Thomas C., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Died of camp fever at Savannah, GA March 26, 1862. Buried in Cave Hill Cemetery at Louisville,KY
  36. Giddens, William H., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Died of pneumonia at Springfield, GA September 14, 1862.
  37. Griffin, John M., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Appointed Sergeant in 1861. Roll for December 31, 1861, last on file, shows him on sick leave. No later record.
  38. Harrell, Hiram F., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Died of measles at Darien, GA February 4, 1863.
  39. Henry, John, Private, enlisted March 1862. Captured at Nashville, TN December 16, 1864. Released at Camp Douglas, IL June 19, 1865. (Born in Georgia in 1842.)
  40. Herndon, John, Private, enlisted December 25, 1861. Killed at Chickamauga, GA September 19, 1863.
  41. Hodges, Jesse (or Hodge), Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. On expired sick furlough October 31, 1862. Pension records show he was captured at Nashville, TN December 16, 1864, and sent to Camp Chase, OH or to Camp Douglas, IL No later record. Died in Berrien County, GA December 7, 1893.
  42. Hodges, William (or Hodge), Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Captured at Nashville, TN December 16, 1864. Died of pneumonia at Camp Chase, OH January 26, 1865. Grave #901, Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery.
  43. James, John A., Private, enlisted November 4, 1861. Sick at Springfield, GA
    September 30, 1862. Admitted to St. Mary’s Hospital at LaGrange, GA June 19, 1864. Killed at Murfreesboro, TN December 7, 1864.
  44. Johnson, Jarred, Private, enlisted December 5, 1861. Discharged on account of chronic rheumatism at Causton’s Bluff, GA, July 19, 1862.
  45. Lastinger, Elias, Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. At Camp Young on special duty December 31, 1862. Killed at Peachtree Creek, GA July 20, 1864.
  46. Lastinger, Lacy E., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Captured at Nashville, TN December 16, 1864. Released at Johnson’s Island, OH June 16, 1865. (Born in Ware County, GA August 3, 1843. Died December 4, 1936. Buried at Adel, GA)
  47. Lindsey, M. R., Pension records show he enlisted May 10, 1862, was wounded in right shoulder at Kennesaw Mountain, GA June 27, 1864; was furloughed for 60 days in 1864, and was unable to return. (Born in GA)
  48. Luke, Jasper M., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Received pay for services from October 1, 1861, to February 7, 1862, on May 2, 1862, and was discharged, disability, date not given.
  49. Luke, John B., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. On detail, nurse in hospital, December 30, 1862. No later record.
  50. Mainer, Lovett B., Private, enlisted December 5, 1861. Died of chronic diarrhoea in Lowndes County, GA December 5, 1863.
  51. Marks, Jacob, Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Absent, sick, June 1862. Pension records show he was wounded and permanently disabled at Chickamauga, GA September 19, 1863.
  52. McCranie, Elijah, Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Roll for December 31, 1861, last on file, shows him present. Pension records show he was wounded and permanently disabled near Atlanta, GA August 7, 1864, and was on Provost Guard duty close of war. (Born in Lowndes County, GA December 6, 1839.)
  53. McCranie, Neil, Private, enlisted November 4, 1861. Died of pneumonia at Yazoo City, MS June 7, 1863.
  54. McCranie, Waldo C., Private, enlisted November 4, 1861. Discharged on account of rheumatism, at Causton’s Bluff, GA May 28, 1862. Pension records show he reenlisted in 1863 and was in Columbus, MS hospital close of war. (Born in Lowndes County, GA July 16, 1840.)
  55. McCutcheon, John, Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Paroled at Thomasville, GA May 20, 1865.
  56. McDermid, Angus, Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. On furlough September 30, 1862. Killed at Murfreesboro, TN December 7, 1864.
  57. McNabb, Daniel R., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Wounded at Chickamauga, GA September 19, 1863. Died of wounds near Dalton, GA September 22, 1863.
  58. Morris, Edward, Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Died of camp fever and measles at Savannah, GA March 5 or 15, 1862.
  59. Nickens, William W., Private, enlisted October 5, 1861. Died at Mont- gomery, ALA October 3, 1863.
  60. O’Neil, James L., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Absent, sick, December 31, 1862. In French’s Division Hospital at Lockhart, MS August 31, 1863. No later record.
  61. Parrish, John A., Private, enlisted November 1, 1861. Absent, sick, December 31, 1861. In Convalescent Camp August 31, 1862. Wounded at Pine Mountain, GA June 14, 1864. Never returned to command.
  62. Parrish, Redding B., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Died of measles at Darien, GA December 17, 1861.
  63. Patterson, John R., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Appointed Sergeant. Wounded near Atlanta, GA August 1864. Died in Ford (or Foard) Hospital at Forsyth, GA August 14, 1864.
  64. Peeples, Joseph H., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Died of chronic diarrhoea at Lauderdale Spring, MS September 10, 1863.
  65. Peeples, William H., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Paroled at Thomasville, GA May 25, 1865.
  66. Pounds, James D., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Appointed Sergeant. Captured near Atlanta, GA July 22, 1864. Paroled at Camp Chase, OH and transferred to City Point, VA for exchange, March 4, 1865. Received at Boulware & Cox’s Wharves, James River, VA, March 10-12, 1865. No later record.
  67. Richardson, Eli T., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. At Convalescent Camp August 31, 1862. Pension records show he was at home on furlough close of war. (Born in Thomas County, GA in 1841.)
  68. Richardson, M. J., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Roll for December 31, 1861, last on file, shows him present. No later record. (Born in Coweta County, GA in 1834.)
  69. Sirmans, William S., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Captured at Atlanta, GA July 22, 1864. Paroled at Camp Chase, OH and sent via New Orleans, LA for exchange, May 2, 1865.
  70. Smith, George Pinkney, Private, enlisted 1862. Received within Union lines as a Confederate deserter June 18, 1864. Took oath of allegiance to U. S. Government, at Louisville,KY June 18, 1864, and was sent to be released north of Ohio River. (Born in South Carolina.)
  71. Strickland, Elias, Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. On extra duty as teamster September 1862. No later record. Pension records show he contracted pneumonia on march with General Hood into TN Died at home.
  72. Strickland, Joseph, Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Discharged by civil authority at Camp Young November 26, 1861.
  73. Tomlinson, Jonas, Private, enlisted November 21, 1861. Elected Lieutenant. Captured at Decatur, GA July 22, 1864. Released at Johnson’s Island, OH June 15, 1865.
  74. Tomlinson, Leonard H., Private, enlisted November 21, 1861. Absent, sick, December 30, 1862. No later record.
  75. Tomlinson, Samuel, Private, enlisted November 21, 1861. Wounded in right eye, resulting in loss of sight, and captured at Nashville, TN December 16, 1864. Released at Camp Chase, OH June 12, 1865.
  76. Touchstone, Charles S., Private, enlisted December 25, 1861. Discharged by civil authority at Camp Young November 28, 1862. Enlisted as a Private, enlisted in Co. H, 4th Regiment GA Cavalry (Clinch’s), September 20, 1863. Appointed 2d Sergeant. Paroled at Thomasville, GA May 10, 1865.
  77. Touchstone, Richard, See Private, enlisted , Co. C.
  78. Truett, Jacob, Private, enlisted December 5, 1861. Wounded in left shoulder at Murfreesboro, TN December 7, 1864. Admitted to Way Hospital at Meridian, MS, on account of wounds, January 19, 1865. Pension records show he surrendered at Greensboro, NC April 26, 1865. (Born in South Carolina February 9, 1834.)
  79. Watkins, W. F., Enlisted as a Private, enlisted in Co. D, 2d Battalion. GA Cavalry December 3, 1861. Transferred to Co. D, 29th Regiment GA Infantry January 7, 1862.
  80. Wheeler, Evans, Private, enlisted November 4, 1861. Roll for December 31, 1861, last on file, shows him present. No later record.
  81. Wheeler, William W., Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Captured at Nashville, TN December 16, 1864. Paroled at Camp Chase, OH and sent via New Orleans, LA for exchange, May 2, 1865. Received at Vicksburg, MS May 12, 1865.
  82. Williams, Joshua, Private, enlisted October 1, 1861. Deserted at Camp Young, December 28, 1862.

Related Posts

 

1948 Nashville High School Elections

1948 Nashville High School Elections

1948 Nashville High School Elections, Berrien County, GA Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

1948 Nashville High School Elections, Berrien County, GA. Left to Right: Chairman, Coach Lossie L. Gaskins, Carroll Dorsey, Mary Dees, Mary Jo Forehand, Juanita Ewing, Marie Baker, Sarah Bryan, Billie Ruth Nix, Doris Sanders, Rachel Parrish, Loretha Bridges, Margaret Davis, Julia Davis. Faye Watson. Joe Sizemore at podium. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

Related Posts:

« Older entries