Delilah Drawdy ~ Centenarian

Tifton Gazette
Feb. 28, 1913

 

Berrien News Item, Feb 28, 1913 - Delilah Drawdy

Berrien News Item, Feb 28, 1913 – Delilah Drawdy

Berrien county boasts of a lady resident 102 years old, Mrs. Delilah Drawdy, says the Sparks Eagle. She has over three hundred grand-children and moved to Georgia from North Carolina. She can thread a needle without glasses; has a good number of quilts she made herself; is able to do house work; goes whereever she wishes; enjoys her meals, and can talk very interestingly of the changes in the modes of travel during her century and more of life.

Dr. P. H. Askew and Delilah Hinson Drawdy, circa 1904.

Dr. P. H. Askew and Delilah Hinson Drawdy, circa 1904. Image courtesy of berriencountyga.com

Ridin’ in a REO–In  what is believed to be the first car in Berrien County, Dr. P.H. Askew and Mrs. Delilah Drawdy ride in style in a REO two-seater. Dr. Askew wanted Mrs. Drawdy to be his first passenger in his new car, and when asked if she was afraid to go for a ride in the REO, she replied, “Why should I be? I’ll have a doctor driving?”

The photo was taken about 1904,  the first year the REO Motor Car Company produced automobiles.

 Dr. Pleasant H. Askew was a prominent physician, businessman and landowner of Nashville, GA. In the 1920s he purchased a farm from Sullivan J. Knight along Cat Creek about five miles north of Ray City, GA; it was one of several Berrien County properties he owned.

Delilah Drawdy died in March, 1914

Obituary of Delilah Drawdy

Obituary of Delilah Drawdy

 Tifton Gazette
March 27, 1914

Died at Age of 102.

Adel, March 17. Mrs. Delilah Drawdy, who died at the age of 102 at Rays Mill Sunday, removed one of the most remarkable women in the state. She married Noah Green when she was 15, and to them was born 10 children, five of whom are still living. The oldest child is eighty-four years of age, and the youngest is sixty-four. Mrs. Drawdy was twice married, her second husband being Levy Drawdy, with whom she lived twenty-five years. Two sons were born to them, one of which survives her. Her grand children, great grand children and great great grandchildren number over 400.
    Mrs. Drawdy was a grand mother of sheriff J. M. Shaw’s first wife.  She retained her faculties well, despite her age and remembered when the “stars fell.”

Other remembrances included:

Mrs. Drawdy, probably the oldest woman in the State of Georgia died at her home in Rays Mill Sunday. She was 102 years old, and was the grandmother of J. H. May and Mrs. J. M. Shaw of Adel…. She was able to sit up and sew until a few weeks before her death , and at the age of 101, she made a quilt for her grandson, J. H. May. Her eyesight and hearing were good and she maintained her metal faculties until the last. She joined the Primitive Baptist Church in 1852. Burial took place at Milltown Monday. She was born in North Carolina and moved to Georgia when she was 15 years old. Surviving children, William Green of Stockton, Mrs. Baten of Sparks, Mrs. D. M. Drawdy of Rays Mill, H. H. Green of Rays Mill, Mrs. H. Cox of Dupont and S. M. Drawdy of Hahira.

Affectionately known as “Dillie, her maiden name was Delilah Ann Hinson.  She was born on Christmas Day, 1812 in Anson County, North Carolina a daughter of Frances Steward and Charles “King” Hinson. As a young woman she came with her father to Pulaski County, GA.  About 1827 she married Noah Green, also of North Carolina.  Census records for Noah Green show he and Dillie made their household in Captain Lenam’s District, Pulaski County, GA.

Children of Delilah A. Hinson and Noah Green:

  1. William Hiram Green (1834-1916)
  2. Elizabeth Green (1834-1886)
  3. James Green (1836-)
  4. Frankie Angeline Green (1840-1922)
  5. Charles R Green (1842-)
  6. John B Green (1843-)
  7. Susannah Green(1846-)
  8. Houston H Green (1849-1925)
  9. Sarah Ann Green(1853-1945)

Family tradition says about 1854-55 Noah Green relocated his household to that part of Lowndes county which was soon to be cut into the new county of Berrien.  But almost at the moment of arrival at the new homestead, Noah Green suffered a heart attack and died,  leaving the widowed Dillie to raise a family on her own.

Within a year or two Delilah Hinson Green married again.  Her second husband was the widower Levi Drawdy, a prosperous farmer in Berrien County.  He was a son of John Drawdy, born October 15, 1803, in the Barnwell District of South Carolina. His uncle Daniel Drawdy was a veteran of the Revolutionary War. Drawdy’s first wife, Rebecca Carter, was a daughter of Elijah Carter, Sr., who lived on Little Saltketcher Creek on the Barnwell-Colleton line in South Carolina. Levi and Rebecca Drawdy made their home in Barnwell county until 1834 when they moved to settle on land on the west side of the Alapaha River in present day Lanier County, GA. Many of the Carter family connection had already come from South Carolina to settle in the same area. On June 7, 1834 Drawdy and his wife Rebecca were baptized into the membership of Union Church. He served as a private in 1838 in the Indian War, in Capt. Jesse Carter’s Company of Lowndes County militia. In 1853, Rebecca Carter Drawdy died and was buried at Union Church near their home. She was survived by her husband and ten children.

About 1854,  the widower Levi Drawdy and the widow Delilah Ann Hinson Green were married.  The couple made a blended household out of their large families. At the time of marriage they had 18 children between the two of them. Their union produced two more.

Children of Delilah Hinson and Levi Drawdy:

  1. Sylvester M. Drawy
  2. Perry Drawdy

Mr. Drawdy was buried at Union Church. He left a will dated July 25, 1864, which was probated August 25, 1881, in Lowndes Court of Ordinary. His son, Daniel, was designated as executor. His home place and farm, Lot of Land No. 389 in 11th district of Lowndes, was divided among the wife and surviving children: Daniel Drawdy, Levi Drawdy, Jr., Sylvester M. Drawdy, Mrs. Christina Drawdy Wetherington, Mrs. Elizabeth Green Touchston, Mrs. Kiziah Drawdy Rhoden, Mrs. Sarah Drawdy Chitty,  and Fairiby Drawdy.

Delilah Ann Hinson Green Drawdy died in 1914. She is buried along with other members of the Green and Drawdy families in the cemetery at  Union Church.

Feb 22, 1905 Marriage of Mollie Bell Clements

Remember Mollie Bell Clements Lee?  She and her husband, Bill Lee, ordered their home from the Sears Catalog about 1917 (see Ray City’s Mail Order House).  Mollie Bell Clements and William David “Bill” Lee were married on Wednesday, February 22, 1905.   Presented here,  the wedding announcement that appeared in The Valdosta Times.

The bride was a daughter of Martha J. Baskin and David Clements. The groom was a son of Moses C. Lee and Amanda Clements.

1905 Wedding announcement of Mollie Bell Clements, of Ray City, and William David Lee, of Milltown.

1905 Wedding announcement of Mollie Bell Clements, of Ray City, and William David Lee, of Milltown. The announcement appeared in the Saturday, February 25, 1905 edition of The Valdosta Times.

The Valdosta Times
Saturday, February 25, 1905

A Wedding Near Ray’s Mill.

      The home of Mrs. Martha Clements, near Ray’s Mill, was the scene of a very pretty wedding Wednesday afternoon, the contracting parties being Miss Mollie Clements and Mr. William David Lee, of Milltown. The ceremony was performed by Rev. L. R. Christie and was witnessed by a large number of friends of the contracting parties. The bride is a very popular as well as pretty young woman, and is a daughter of the late David Clements. The groom is a prominent merchant and naval stores operator at Milltown.
      The couple received many handsome presents and are receiving many congratulations and good wishes from their host of friends.

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Moses Lee ~ Exemplary Farmer

Moses C. Lee (1853-1926) was an outstanding farmer of Berrien County, GA.

He was a son of John Levy Lee and nephew of Moses Corby Lee (1808-1884), both pioneer settlers and prominent land owners of  old Berrien.  His father and uncle were veterans of the Indian Wars of 1838 and fought with Levi J. Knight’s Militia Company in the last Indian fight in Berrien County, GA.  His mother was Elender Wetherington (1813-1889).  He was the father-in-law of Lint Miller and one of the investors in the Miller Hardware & Furniture Company.

Born July 12, 1853,  Moses C. Lee (1853-1926) was sometimes referred to as M.C. Lee, Jr. to distinguish him from his uncle. Moses C. Lee, the subject, first appears at age six in Census records in the  1860 enumeration of his father’s household in Berrien County, GA.  His father’s real estate was valued at 3500 and personal estate at $3800.

On November 1879, Moses C. Lee married Amanda Clements in Berrien County, GA.   Born Sarah Amanda Clements, she was a daughter of  John F. Clements and Nancy Patten, and a sister of John Miles Clements.

The newlyweds made their home in a house on the farm of Moses’ father, John Levy (or Levi) Lee, where they were enumerated in the Census of 1880.

After the death of his father, John Levy Lee, in 1884, Moses Lee carried on working his Berrien County farm.  Moses Lee’s residence was known as “Stoney Hill,” according to William Green Avera.  The Lee place was situated on the road “from Milltown to Tyson Ferry on the Alapaha River just east of the present site of Alapaha.” This road passed the residences of John Studstill, first Sheriff of Berrien County; Judge J. H. Rowan; and Keefe and Bullocks Turpentine Still.

By 1896 Moses Lee was recognized as one of the leading farmers in this section.

Tifton Gazette, March 7, 1896 praises the work of Berrien County, GA farmer Moses Lee.

Tifton Gazette, March 7, 1896 praises the work of Berrien County, GA farmer Moses Lee.

Well, I have the results of what Mr. Mose Lee, has stored away, for another specimen of what can be obtained in the wiregrass region.  Will take corn first.  On his farm he housed between 1500 and 2,000 bushels of “little cob” corn, and some where near 11,000 pounds of well cured fodder.  He dug and housed 12,000 bushels of sweet potatoes, and left enough in the patch to fatten 100 head of hogs. Cotton! cotton! He raised nineteen bales of cotton, averaging four hundred pounds each, which amounts to 7,600 pounds, and has jugged and barreled 750 gallons of syrup, of the finest that can be made.  He killed enough porkers to amount to 12,000 pounds and from them he obtained about 1,650 pounds of lard.  Hay he housed enough to winter 50 or 60 head of cows, beside old “Buck”.  As it was a bad year for oats and rice he only housed about 5,000 bundles of oats and 80 or 100 bushels of rice.
    He has enlarged his farm this year, by adding 40 acres of new land.  He is only going to use ten tons of guano this year.
    We hear some folks crying hard times, but all they have to do is to work with energy and vote for Hammond.  If anyone thinks that I have exaggerated in stating the above facts, I can only refer them to Mr. Lee, Milltown, Ga.

In 1917, M. C. Lee was employing Randolph Graham, John Thomas Brantley and Fletcher Turner to farm his land.

Children of Moses C. Lee and Amanda Clements Lee:

  1. William David Lee (1880 – 1967) married Mollie Clements
  2. Jennie L Lee (1882 – 1974)  married Sam I Watson, 1900
  3. Ellen D Lee (1883 – 1907) married William R. Smith; died of measles April 30, 1907
  4. John Vinson Lee (1885 – 1947) married Camilla Spence
  5. L. Chester Lee (1887 –1908) died of typhoid fever December 14, 1908
  6. Winnie Lee (1888-1891)
  7. Lena A Lee (1891 – 1971) married Willis Linton “Lint” Miller, 1913
  8. Remer E Lee (1893 – 1901) died of blood poisoning
  9. Mary Emma Lee (1895 –1986) married 1) Virgil Shingler; 2) J.Crawford Dasher
  10. Infant Lee – born and died July 22, 1897

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Watson Grade News Feb 12, 1904

“Trixie”  continued the reports on Watson Grade in the February 12, 1904 edition of the Tifton Gazette.  Watson Grade  was a small community near Empire Church just northeast of Ray’s Mill, GA.  It was the location of the Watson family farm and the home of Sam I. Watson, among others. Like the January Watson Grade News   this February update included several bits on the family of William and Betsy Patten, as well as reports of marriages and social news.

Tifton Gazette
February 12, 1904

Watson Grade News

The farmers are making big preparations for another crop-buying mules and clearing new grounds.
    Mr. Editor, your solution of the fertilizer question in last week’s issue is the only one that the farmer of today is actually in touch with. The farmers, not being systematically organized, are dependent in selling their products and buying their general supplies, and the only way to surpass this stupid state is for each and every farmer to work to the end of not having “everything to buy.”  Raise it at home; we have all the necessities if we will only use a little energy.
    Mr. M. C. Lee killed a porker last week that weighed 486, net.
    Mrs W. C. Patten has been quite sick with pneumonia, but is improving.
    Mr. J. P. Patten and Miss Fannie Patten were united in marriage Sunday afternoon at the home of the bride’s parents. Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Patten, near Milltown.  The bride is a sweet and lovable girl, and member of one of Berrien’s best families. The groom is an industrious young farmer of near this place.
    Inspector Tyler was in Milltown last week, looking after some rural routes from that place.  Of the three routes proposed, only two have the required number of families, the one passing through this place and the one through the Ray’s mill vicinity.
   Mr. Will Rouse and Miss Elsie Spell were united in marriage Wednesday afternoon, January 27th, at 3 o’clock, at the home of the bride’s parents, Judge J.  H. Rowan officiating. Both have many friends, who wish for them a long and prosperous journey through life.
    Mr. Jonah Register is quite sick with grippe at this writing.
    Mr. June Patten left last week to take charge of a school near Alapaha.
    Mr. Jos. Watson, who has been suffering with cancer for some time, is improving.
    Prof. W. G. Avera expects to move his family to Atlanta in a few days, his object being to educate his children.  Mr. Avera is one of Berrien’s oldest and best educators, and one of our best neighbors, and we see him go with much regret.

TRIXIE.

1904-feb-12-watson-grade-news

Additional Notes:

Moses C. Lee, a son of Elender Wetherington (1813-1889) and John Levy Lee, was one of the leading farmers of Berrien County.  His daughter, Jennie Lee, was the wife of Sam I. Watson. About 1917 his son, William David “Bill” Lee,  ordered a mail-0rder house from the Sears catalog, which he assembled just east of Ray’s Mill.

Mrs. William C. Patten in the article is Sarah E. Lee, a cousin of M.C. Lee mentioned above.  She was a daughter of Moses Corby Lee (1808-1884)   and  Jincy Register.

John P. Patten  was a son of James Patten (1832-1907) and Phoebe Mathis (1832-1898).  His bride was Fannie Patten, daughter of Matthew Elihu Patten  and Martha F. Williams (1847 – 1897). The Mrs. M. E. Patten mentioned in the article was Fannie’s  step-mother Minnie Archibald Patten.  John P. Patten died in 1911 and is buried at Union Church Cemetery, Lakeland, GA.

Will Rouse, of Rays Mill, and Elsie (or Elda?) Spells, of the 1300 Georgia Militia District, were married on January 27, 1904. The couple later made their home at Ray City for many years. The marriage ceremony was performed by Judge J. H. Rowan.  According to William Green Avera, the Judge’s place was on the road “from Milltown to Tyson Ferry on the Alapaha River just east of the present site of Alapaha.”  This road passed the residences of John Studstill, first Sheriff of Berrien County; Stony Hill, residence of Moses C. Lee; and, Keefe and Bullocks Turpentine Still.

Jonah Register, son of John Register, was a young farmer of Berrien County, GA. He was suffering from grippe, a historical reference to the flu.  He later married Jane Cook, sister of Laura Cook and daughter of William Jackson Cook.  In the 1920s Jonah and Jane Register made their home in Ray City, GA.

Mr. June Patten was a son of Leanna and Irwin Patten.

Joseph Watson was the father of Samuel I Watson.

Professor William Green Avera was one of the most distinguished educators in Berrien County.

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Charles Woodrow Schmoe ~ Ray City School Principal

Charles Woodrow “Woody” Schmoe served as principal of the school in Ray City, GA in the late 1940s and early 1950s.

1952 Charles Woodrow Schmoe was principal of the Ray City School.

1952 Charles Woodrow Schmoe was principal of the Ray City School.

SCHMOE Charles Woodrow “ Woody” Schmoe, 88, of Quitman, (Brooks County) Georgia, passed away on November 25, 2001, after a long illness. He was born on June 26, 1913, in Shelbyville, Indiana, to Frederick Charles and Daisy Ellen Murphy Schmoe. He graduated from Shelbyville High School in 1931 and Butler University in 1939. He served in WWII as a Lieutenant with two years in the Eisenhower Headquarters in London and Paris.

WWII correspondence from General Eisenhower's headquarters, signed by C. W. Schmoe.

WWII correspondence from General Eisenhower’s headquarters, signed by C. W. Schmoe.

 C. W. Schmoe taught school in Shelby County, IN, and served as principal of the Ray City School, Berrien County, GA .

Ray City School, 1948-49, C. W. Schmoe, Principal.

Ray City School, 1948-49, C. W. Schmoe, Principal.

In 1954 he purchased Blackwater Plantation near Quitman, GA  and ran an extensive farming, cattle and timber operation there. Mr. Schmoe was a Freemason, active member of The Florida and Georgia Cattlemans Associations and the National Cattlemans Beef Association, and took part in state and local political activities. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Nancy Young Schmoe; his three daughters and their husbands, Suwannee and Louis Shuntich, Holland, PA, Susannah and Stefan Borg, Ponte Vedra, FL and Jeannie and Gary Wisenbaker, Savannah,. GA; his five grandchildren, Savanna Shuntick, Sophia Borg, Christian, Anna, and Frederick Wisenbaker; his nephew, Steve Irick, of Edinburg, IN, and his sister-in-law, Snead Y. Davis of Jacksonville. The Funeral and Interment was held at Blackwater Plantation, Quitman, GA.

Charles Woodrow Schmoe, Principal, Ray City School, 1949-1950

Charles Woodrow Schmoe, Principal, Ray City School, 1949-1950

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Feb 4, 1911 Ray’s Mill News Items

Rays Mill news items appearing in the Feb 4, 1911 Valdosta Times were about the business and social scene in the new town.

The Valdosta Times
 Saturday, February 4, 1911, page 7,
Rays Mill News Items

     Mr. A.L. Bridges has moved into his new building here.
     Mr. W. L. Swindle, of Nashville, has accepted a position with his brother, Mr. J.S. Swindle, of this place.
     Miss Leslie Langford returned to Rays Mill Wednesday night from Vidalia.
Mrs. L.  J. Clements is spending a few days in Milltown this week.
    Mr. G. V. Hardee, druggist of this place, moved in his new building Wednesday.
    Mr. I. Burkhalter made a business trip to Nashville Wednesday.
    Mr. Floyd Fender, of Tifton, is visiting Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Fender for a few days.
    Mrs. Baskin, Mrs. Terry, Mrs. Dr. Clements, Miss Fannie Clements and Miss Lessie Carter represented Beaver Dam Missionary Society at the missionary rally in Valdosta last Tuesday, January 31, and lunch was served at the Tabernacle. They report a good meeting, also a pleasant time for all who attended.
    Mr. A. L. Taylor, of Nashville, has bought Mr. J.T. Webb’s store.
    Mr. W. M. Carter, of Rays Mill, visited Tifton last Saturday returning Sunday night.
    Mr. W. H. Terry made a business trip to Valdosta Wednesday.
    Mr. George Norton spent a few days in Macon last week returning Monday night.

Ray City News appeared in The Valdosta Times, Feb 4, 1911.

Ray City News appeared in The Valdosta Times, Feb 4, 1911.

Austin Lawrence Bridges was a merchant from who came to Ray City in 1909 with his bride, Della Pope.  He bought a house on Jones Street and opened a dry goods store.

William Lawrence Swindle was a farmer of the Ray City area and former Sheriff of Berrien County.  He was a brother of James S. Swindle, and son of James Swindle, Pioneer Settler.

Leslie Alma Langford was the daughter of William E. Langford and Mary Virginia Knight, and sister of Luther Etheldred Langford. In 1918 she married Walter Greene Altman. At the time he was a clerk working for Nix & Miller Company, a sawmill in Ray City, GA, but shortly thereafter he became an ice dealer.  Later Walter owned a cafe where Leslie worked as a waitress.

Mrs. L. J. Clements was Eugenia  Watkins Clements, wife of Lucius J. Clements. Her parents were Sarah and Thomas H. Watkins, of Whitesburg, Carroll County, GA.  She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from La Grange College in 1907.

Gordon Vancie Hardie was a druggist and entrepreneur of Ray City.

Isaac Burkhalter, Jr was born 1863 in Clinch County, GA just weeks before his father, Captain Isaac Burkhalter was killed at Gettysburg. Isaac Burkhalter, the son, made his home at Rays Mill some time before 1900 with his wife, Marentha Sirmans, where he engaged in farming until his death.

Wilson W. Fender was the owner of the Fender Hotel in Ray City.  His wife Lena Fender was in millinery. His eldest son was telephone lineman Floyd Fender, of Tifton, and his younger son’s were Ike and Lutie. Ike Fender was a telephone operator and Lutie Fender was a soda jerk.

The Ladies of the Beaver Dam Missionary Society

  • Mrs. Baskin mentioned in the story could have been one of several Baskin women: Mary Ann Harrell Baskin, second wife of James B. Baskin; her step-daughter, Fannie Ellen Hagan Baskin; or another of the Baskin wives.  The Baskin family  helped found the Baptist Church at Ray City.
  • Mrs. Terry was Nebbie Luckie Terry. She was a daughter of William F. Luckie and wife of W. H. E. Terry, also mentioned in the article.
  • Mrs. Dr. Clements was Pauline Nelson Clements, wife of Dr. Henry Warren Clements. Dr. Clements owned  the second gasoline powered automobile in Berrien County, a Maxwell Doctor’s Roadster.
  • Miss Fannie Lola Clements was a daughter of Martha J. Cements and David C. Clements.
  • Miss Lessie E. Carter was a daughter of Lorenzo D. Carter and Anna Eliza Fender.

Jesse Thomas Webb, who sold his store in Rays Mill, was a son of Mary and John L. Webb, of the Connells Mill District. After selling his store in Rays Mill he moved to Tifton, GA and opened a store there.

William Manson Carter was a son of Lorenzo D. Carter and Anna Eliza Fender, and brother of Lessie E. Carter. In 1917 he worked as a druggist for C. O. Terry.

William Henry Edward Terry came to Ray City about 1910 and built the first brick building in the new town.