Chester Lee died of Typhoid Pneumonia

Chester Lee (1887-1908)

Chester Lee, son of Moses Lee and Amanda Clements, had attended the  Georgia Normal College and Business Institute  in Abbeville, GA.    He was a classmate there with Joe and Irwin Clements in 1904, and a number of other young men and women of Ray City were alumni of the college.

A personal mention in th September 9, 1904 edition of the Tifton Gazette. Irwin and Joe Clements, and Chester L. Lee headed to college.

A personal mention in th September 9, 1904 edition of the Tifton Gazette. Irwin and Joe Clements, and Chester L. Lee headed to college.

By  1908 the school had relocated to Douglas, GA and in the fall of that year, Chester Lee was continuing his education at the college.     It was a great convenience that  the Georgia & Florida Railroad line connecting Douglas and Ray City, GA had just opened in October 1908.

Georgia Normal College and Business Institute at Douglas, GA photographed circa 1920.

Georgia Normal College and Business Institute at Douglas, GA photographed circa 1920.

 

But by November 1908,  Chester became ill while at the college.  He returned  to the Berrien County home of his parents to die.

1908 Obituary of Chester Lee, son of Moses Lee and Amanda Clements

1908 Obituary of Chester Lee, son of Moses Lee and Amanda Clements

Valdosta Times
December 19, 1908

A Sad Death at Milltown

       Miltown, Ga., Dec. 17. – Chester Lee, the third son of Mr. and Mrs. Moses Lee, a prominent farmer who lives two miles from town, died at the home of his father yesterday morning of typhoid pneumonic fever contracted while he was at school at Douglas.
       Chester came home about five weeks ago complaining of being ill, and took to his bed immediately, since then all that medical skill and loving kindness could do for him was done, but he answered the call of the grim reaper yesterday morning. All of his brothers and sisters was at the bed side when the end came. Chester was just budding into manhood, and was loved by all who became acquainted with him. He was laid to rest at Union cemetery near here this morning, followed by a large crowd of sorrowing friends.
      His death falls very heavily on his parents, as this makes the fourth child that they have lost in as many years.

Grave marker of L. Chester Lee, Union Cemetery, Lanier County, GA. Image source: Tonya Studstill Long

Grave marker of L. Chester Lee, Union Cemetery, Lanier County, GA. Image source: Tonya Studstill Long

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Rema Lee died of Blood Poisoning

Rema Lee (1893-1901)

Rema Lee was born May 1, 1893, a son of Amanda Clements and Moses Lee who lived east of Ray City, GA.   His father was a prominent farmer of Berrien County. His older brother was Bill Lee,  who built a mail-order home from the Sears Catalog near Ray City.   Tragically, Rema died at the age of eight after injuring his foot with a garden hoe.

Rema Lee, son of Moses Lee and Amanda Clements, died of blood poisoning in 1901.

Rema Lee, son of Moses Lee and Amanda Clements, died of blood poisoning in 1901.

Tifton Gazette
May 10, 1901

The eight-year-old son of Mr. Mose Lee, living in the Milltown district of Berrien county, died on Sunday, after an illness of about a week.  The lad’s death was due to blood poisoning caused from a wound he received a week previous to his death while chopping weeds with a hoe in the yard.  – Times

 

According to the Standard Medical Manual 1901 edition, blood poisoning or “septicemia”  is

“an infective disease caused by the presence in the blood of septic bacteria or their products. The term is usually restricted to the disease resulting from the presence of streptococci or staphylococci or their toxins in the blood. The germs may gain access to the blood through infection of wounds, or by ware of sores, erosions or abrasions of the skin or mucous membranes.  In true septicemia the symptoms are intense and overwhelming. They usually make their appearance within two or three days after infection. There is a severe chill and the temperature goes up with a bound. Within a few hours it is 104° to 105° F. The pulse is very rapid and soon becomes feeble and thready.  Respiration is hurried and shallow. There is severe  headache, loss of appetite, frequently vomiting and diarrhea.  The face becomes drawn, sharpened and anxious, the patient soon lapses into a condition of mental stupor, later there is mild delirium. Prostration is profound. The fever continues high, there is profuse perspiration, the mouth becomes dry and the tongue brown and tremulous. Death frequently takes place within four or five days.”

Grave of Rema Lee, Union Church Cemetery, Lanier County GA

Grave of Rema Lee, Union Church Cemetery, Lanier County GA

Moses Clements Lee

Mose Clements Lee was born November 14, 1916, the sixth child of William David Lee and Mollie Bell Clements. His siblings were Vivian Lee, Fannie Lee, Ruth Amanda Lee, Willie E. Lee, and Mary E. Lee.

Moses Clements Lee, of Ray City, attended the University of Georgia.

Moses Clements Lee, of Ray City, attended the University of Georgia.  1942 UGA photo

At the time of his birth, the family home was in a two-room log cabin near Ray City, GA. About 1917, his parents ordered a “Modern Home,” The Avondale, No. 151, from the Sears Modern Homes Mail Order Catalog. The materials were probably shipped via the Georgia and Florida Railroad to Ray City, then carried by wagon to the Lee farm about three miles east of town where the home was were assembled.

After completing high school Mose C. Lee attended the University of Georgia. He was employed as an airplane mechanic. On November 25, 1942 he enlisted in the Army at Fort Mcpherson in Atlanta. After the war he returned to UGA where he completed his Bachelor of Business Administration and graduated on June 14, 1946.

He later returned to live in Lanier County, GA.

Mose C. married Jeanelle Curry, of Greenwood MS and they made their home in Lanier County, GA.

Mose Clements Lee died in 1999 and Jeanelle died in 2006.  The Lees are buried at the city cemetery in Lakeland, GA.

Grave of Mose Clements Lee and Jeanelle Lee

Grave of Mose Clements Lee and Jeanelle Lee

Watson Grade News May 27, 1904

 

Family of Samuel W. Watson

Family of Samuel W. Watson
Samuel. W. Watson (1863-1925), a son of Mark R. Watson and Rachel Slaughter, was born and raised in the Rays Mill district (1144 Georgia Militia District).
Back Row: James Watson (= Jim Watson, died single, ~28 yo), Bertha Watson (later, married Joe Outlaw). Middle Row: Samuel W. Watson (= Samuel Watson, Sam Watson),Elizabeth Betsy (Boykin) Watson . Front Row: Georgian Ann, Watson , later married Lewis Keeffe), Mark A. Watson (= Mark Watson), circa 1900. Courtesy of Bill Outlaw http://berriencountyga.com/

ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω⋅ω

Watson Grade News, Tifton Gazette, May 27, 1904

Watson Grade News, Tifton Gazette, May 27, 1904

Tifton Gazette
May 27, 1894

Watson Grade News.

    We had some very nice raining with some hail last Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Patten, of Adel, were visitors in this section last Saturday and Sunday.
    The school at ‘Possum Trot closed last Saturday with appropriate exercises and an excellent dinner. The school was under the management of Mr. Walter Patten and was a success in every respect.
    Miss Merl Smith, of High Springs is visiting Miss Belle Patten.
    Barney, the six months’ old son of Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Akins died last Saturday of fever, near this place, after an illness of four weeks.  The remains were interred in Empire cemetery Sunday afternoon.
    Mr. S. W. Watson, of Irwin, was in this section last week looking after some lands that are for sale.
    Mr. K. E. Stapleton, of Milltown, is very sick at this writing.
    Oat cutting is the order of the day now.
    Mr. Mansfield Shaw and Miss Addie Greene were united in marriage Sunday afternoon, Rev. A. A. Knight officiating.
    Mr. R. M. Greene is in Idaho, traveling for a buggy company.
    Mr. M. C. Lee killed a rattlesnake near his yard one day last week that measured nearly six feet.
    Miss Fannie Clements, of Rays Mill, is visiting relatives in this section.
    Miss Rhoda Greene,  who has been very sick for the past week, is convalesing.
    Quite a crowd of young folks enjoyed a social entertainment at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Clements last Saturday evening.
    Miss Mary Clements, of Rays Mill, is visiting her sister, Mrs. M. C. Lee.
                             TRIXIE

 

Additional notes on Watson Grade:

Mr.  & Mrs. M.S. Patten
Marcus Sheridan Patten (1862 – 1950) was a son of William Patten and Elizabeth Register, of Watson Grade near Ray’s Mill, GA.   In 1904,  Marcus and his wife of two years, Mittie Cordelia Walker,  resided at Adel, GA.   In McMillan and Allied Families,  Robert H. McMillan described Mittie as “an exceptional woman, tall and aristocratic in manner and height.” Mittie’s father, Edgar David Walker (1859 – 1927), operated  a turpentine still about five miles east of Adel.  Her mother, Malissa McMillan (1861 – 1885),  had died when Mittie was about four years old, and Mittie spent most of her childhood with her grandparents, John and Sallie McMillan, in Berrien County.

Possum Trot 
Possum Trot  was one of the common schools of the area. In 1906 Possum Trot School was consolidated with Round Pond and Guthrie School.

Miss Belle Patten
Miss Belle Patten, age 21,  was a daughter of 
James “Irwin” Patten and Leanna Patten. 

Barney Akins
Barney Akins (died of fever) was an infant son of  Robert Henry “Bob” Akins (1876-1941) and  Sarah Jane Murray (1883-1948).  Bob Akins was a grandson of William Green Akins, one of the hunters who tracked down and killed the Berrien Tiger in 1849.

Mr. S.W. Watson
Samuel W. Watson (1863-1925), a son of Mark R Watson and Rachel Slaughter, was born and raised in the Rays Mill district (1144 Georgia Militia District).  S.W. Watson moved his family  to Irwin County some time before 1900, but returned to Berrien before 1910.

Mr. K. E. Stapleton
Kennie E. Stapleton, age 21, was a son of James Stapleton and Eliza Jane Morris.  His father was a fisherman with a house on Main Street in Milltown, GA.

Oat Production
Oats were a staple crop for the farmers of Wiregrass Georgia.  Even in a bad year, farmers like M.C. Lee would produce 5,000 bundles of oats.

Mansfield Shaw and Addie Greene
Addie Greene was a granddaughter of Delilah Ann Hinson.  Her parents were Houston Greene and Ann Elizabeth Futch, of the Connells Mill district near Ray’s Mill. Mansfield Shaw was a son of Elbert Marion Shaw and Matilda Mary Waters.

Mr. R. M. Greene
In 1904, Riley M. Green was working for a buggy company. Born April 20, 1873, he was a son of Marshal E. Green and Mary Elizabeth “Maxie” Mathis. Later, he owned real estate in Ray City, GA and was involved in the incorporation of the Bank of Ray’s Mill.  His sister, Mary Elizabeth “Effie” Green, married Thomas J. Studstill, and Riley took a position as manager at the Studstill sawmill.

Mr. M.C. Lee
Moses C. Lee (1853-1926) was an outstanding farmer of Berrien County, GA  known for his production of food crops and cotton, as well as cattle and hogs.

Miss Fannie Clements
This young woman could have been Fannie Clements, daughter of John C. Clements, or Fannie Lola Clements, daughter of David C. Clements.

Rhoda Green
Rhoda Green (1886 – 1912) was a sister of Riley M. Green.  She died in 1912 and was buried at Empire Cemetery, Lanier County, GA.

Mr. and Mrs. J.M. Clements
John Miles Clements and wife, Ann Eliza Swindle Clements, were long time residents of Rays Mill  and the parents of Hosea P. “Hod” Clements.

Mary Clements & Mrs. M.C. Lee
Mary Clements, of Rays Mill, was the spinster sister of  Amanda Clements Lee and John Miles Clements.  Amanda Clements Lee was the wife of Moses C. Lee, a noted farmer of Berrien County.

 

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Pasco Olandro Hall and the Porterdale Mill

Pasco Olandro

Pasco Olandro “Pad” Hall

Pasco Olandro “Pad” Hall was born June 30, 1890 in Rays Mill (nka Ray City), GA.    He was the adopted son of Cassie Lee Hall (1857-1944)  and John Lewis Hall (1858-1918). Pad grew up in Ray City, GA.

Family members say as a young man, “He had blue eyes, brown hair was dark complexion 5 feet 8 inches tall weighed approx 170 lbs.” His occupation was Blacksmith.

During World War I Pasco Hall was enlisted as a private in the Army.  He was inducted at Nashville, GA on November 8, 1918.  His service record shows he was with Battery D, 26th Artillery, Coastal Artillery Corps, Fort Screven, GA, until discharged. Fortunately the Armistice on 11 November 1918, ended the war in victory for the Allies and Pad never saw duty overseas. He received an Honorable Discharge on December 6, 1918 at Fort Screven GA.

Pasco Olandro Hall, WWI Service Record

Pasco Olandro Hall, WWI Service Record

After the war, Pad Hall moved to Porterdale, GA and went to work at the Porterdale Mill of the Bibb Manufacturing Company.  Bibb was one of the largest employers in the state.

Porterdale Mill on the Yellow River, GA

Porterdale Mill on the Yellow River, GA

By the time of the 1920 Census Pasco Olandro Hall was married to Ruby Kirkus, He was 27, Ruby was 17.  The couple were living in the Cedar Shoal district, Newton Co., GA. in the household of Leila Kirkus.

Pasco Olandro Hall died October 22, 1942 in Porterdale, Newton County, GA.  He was buried in the Hall Family Cemetery in Newton County, GA.

Grave of Pasco Olandro Hall

Grave of Pasco Olandro Hall

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Watson Grade News, March 25, 1904

The article below continued a series of 1904, a series of articles in the Tifton Gazette on the residents of “Watson Grade.”  Watson Grade  referred to a place just  northeast of Ray’s Mill, GA, near Empire Church where Watson, Patten, Lee, Cook and Sirmans  families all farmed.    The unknown author “Trixie,”  was familiar with the local happenings. On March 25, 1904, the Watson Grade news included the death of J. E. Sirmans, discussed in the previous post, and other personal mentions. 1904-mar-25-watson-grade-news

Tifton Gazette
March 25, 1904
Mr. J. E. Sirmans Dead.

Mr. J. E. Sirmans died last Saturday night at 11:45. He had been sick only about four days, and was not thought to be dangerously ill until a few hours before his death. Mr. Sirmans has been suffering with heart trouble for several years and Dr. Askew, of Nashville, says it was pleurisy complicated with heart trouble that caused his death. He leaves a wife and ten children to mourn his loss. His remains were interred in the Fender cemetery.

Mrs. J.T. Watson is very sick at this writing with grippe.

Miss Belle Patten has returned home from the Land of Flowers, to the delight of her many friends.

 The Odd Fellows of Milltown enjoyed and oyster supper last Wednesday night to the delight of the new members and themselves. Eight were initiated and twelve more have their applications in.

 Misses Carrie Liles and Dora Edson, of near Milltown, were visitors in this section last Sunday.

Mr. M. C. Lee, one of South Berrien’s best farmers, carried a wagon load of bacon to Valdosta last week that brought him about $180.

Mrs. O. Knight has been very ill, but is improving.

Judge J. T. Wilkerson has resigned as J. P., and has moved to Clinch to enter the mercantile business.

Watson Grade, March 14.             TRIXIE.

Notes:

Mrs. J. T. Watson was Jincy Lee Watson, wife of John Thomas Watson.  She was a daughter of Jincy Register and  Moses Corby Lee.  She was suffering from “Grippe” which was the period idiom for Influenza.

Miss Belle Patten, age 21,  was a daughter of James “Irwin” Patten and Leanna Patten.  She had just returned from visiting relatives in Tampa, FL.  Later, some time before 1910, her brother, June Patten, became a dentist and the two of them moved to Fernandina,  FL.

Carrie Liles (1869 – 1959), born Caroline Cook Brown, was the wife of Ben Liles and a daughter of Burwell Atkinson Brown and Margaret E. Morrison. Her traveling companion, Dora Edson, was a half-sister of her husband, Ben Liles.

Moses C. Lee was a noted farmer of Berrien County, and husband of Amanda Clements.  The Lee farm was known as “Stoney Hill.”

Mrs. O. Knight was Mary Ellen Cook Knight, the wife of Reverend Orville A. Knight.  Her parents,  were neighbors of Irwin and Leanna Patten, mentioned above.

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Lawrence Cauley Hall

Lawrence Cauley Hall, born 20 Feb 1884, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia.  Cauley was a son of Cassie Lee and John Lewis Hall, and a brother of  Pasco Olandro Hall.  He grew up in his parents’ household at Rays Mill (now Ray City), GA.

Lawrence Cauley Hall, of Ray City, GA. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

Lawrence Cauley Hall, of Ray City, GA. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

Cauley Hall completed the common schools of the area, and went on for more advanced studies. Family historian Mrs. Cyleta Austin said “he was a genius, attended Mercer but let the drinking get to him.”   He gave up his college studies after the first year.

On December 1, 1908 Cauley Hall married Eula Bell Swindle.   The ceremony was performed by Elder Aaron Anderson Knight.  Eula was a daughter of  Mary Etta and Redding D. Swindle, and sister of  Henry Alexander Swindle, of Ray City, GA. Her father was appointed to serve as the first mayor of Ray City upon its official incorporation in 1909. Her mother is credited with naming the new town, formerly known as Ray’s Mill.

1908 Marriage license of Lawrence Cauley Hall and Eula Bell Swindle

1908 Marriage license of Lawrence Cauley Hall and Eula Bell Swindle

Eula gave birth to a baby girl on June 9, 1909, Eunice A. Hall, in Ray City, GA.   It appears that Eula and the baby returned to live with her parents. She was enumerated in their Ray City household in 1910 under her maiden name. Her marital status was “single,” and Eunice Hall was enumerated as a grandchild of Redding Swindle. Cauley’s whereabouts in the census of 1910 are not known.

However, by 1918 Cauley and Eula were making their home at a company lumber camp at 4 Northport, Tuscaloosa County, AL.  Lawrence was working for the Henderson Land & Lumber Company as a skidder foreman. There, he registered for the draft for World War I on September 12, 1918.  His physical description was given as medium height, medium build, with blue eyes and grey hair.

The 1920 census shows the couple now with two daughters, Eunice and Helen Jeanette, living on 13th Avenue, Tuscaloosa, AL.  Cauley was working as a laborer at a logging camp, while Eula was at home raising the girls.

It appears that by the time of the 1930 census Cauley Hall was estranged from his wife, Eula B. Swindle. The census record show that year he remained in Tuscaloosa, AL, living in Young’s boarding home on 6th Street, operated by Nannie and Robert J. Young.  He was working as a carpenter, and gave his marital status as “divorced.”  Eula Bell had returned to Ray City,GA with her younger daughter Hazel Jeanette Hall, now 12. Eula rented a house (probably on Jones Street) near the homes of James Blanton, Pleamon Sirmans and Hod Clements, and took work as a seamstress. The 1930 census indicated her marital status was “widowed.

By 1940 Cauley Hall  had also returned to Ray City, GA where he was living with his now married daughter, Hazel, and her husband, Reid Hearn Cox.  Cox, a salesman of music supplies,  originated from Eatonton, GA. The Coxes were in a new home they had built on the northeast corner of North Street and Jones Street in Ray City.

Home of Reid Hearn Cox and Hazel Hall Cox, Jones Street, Ray City, GA. The Coxes had this home built prior to 1940. Hazel's father, Lawrence Cauley Hall, resided with the Coxes in the 1940s.

Home of Reid Hearn Cox and Hazel Hall Cox, Jones Street, Ray City, GA. The Coxes had this home built prior to 1940. Hazel’s father, Lawrence Cauley Hall, resided with the Coxes in the 1940s.

 

Eula Bell Hall was living with her widowed grandmother, Mary Etta Swindle, in her home on North Street in Ray City.

Lawrence Cauley Hall died  on Christmas Day,  December 25, 1954,  in Ray City, Georgia.  He was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery.

Eula Bell Hall died January 28, 1965. Historian Cyleta Austin said she was in an automobile accident with Eula; Eula “died at home about two weeks later but not as a cause of the wreck.”   Eula was buried next to her husband at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Graves of Eula Bell Swindle and Lawrence Cauley Hall

Graves of Eula Bell Swindle and Lawrence Cauley Hall

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Feb 22, 1905 Marriage of Mollie Bell Clements

Remember Mollie Bell Clements Lee?  She and her husband, Bill Lee, ordered their home from the Sears Catalog about 1917 (see Ray City’s Mail Order House).  Mollie Bell Clements and William David “Bill” Lee were married on Wednesday, February 22, 1905.   Presented here,  the wedding announcement that appeared in The Valdosta Times.

The bride was a daughter of Martha J. Baskin and David Clements. The groom was a son of Moses C. Lee and Amanda Clements.

1905 Wedding announcement of Mollie Bell Clements, of Ray City, and William David Lee, of Milltown.

1905 Wedding announcement of Mollie Bell Clements, of Ray City, and William David Lee, of Milltown. The announcement appeared in the Saturday, February 25, 1905 edition of The Valdosta Times.

The Valdosta Times
Saturday, February 25, 1905

A Wedding Near Ray’s Mill.

      The home of Mrs. Martha Clements, near Ray’s Mill, was the scene of a very pretty wedding Wednesday afternoon, the contracting parties being Miss Mollie Clements and Mr. William David Lee, of Milltown. The ceremony was performed by Rev. L. R. Christie and was witnessed by a large number of friends of the contracting parties. The bride is a very popular as well as pretty young woman, and is a daughter of the late David Clements. The groom is a prominent merchant and naval stores operator at Milltown.
      The couple received many handsome presents and are receiving many congratulations and good wishes from their host of friends.

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Moses Lee ~ Exemplary Farmer

Moses C. Lee (1853-1926) was an outstanding farmer of Berrien County, GA.

He was a son of John Levy Lee and nephew of Moses Corby Lee (1808-1884), both pioneer settlers and prominent land owners of  old Berrien.  His father and uncle were veterans of the Indian Wars of 1838 and fought with Levi J. Knight’s Militia Company in the last Indian fight in Berrien County, GA.  His mother was Elender Wetherington (1813-1889).  He was the father-in-law of Lint Miller and one of the investors in the Miller Hardware & Furniture Company.

Born July 12, 1853,  Moses C. Lee (1853-1926) was sometimes referred to as M.C. Lee, Jr. to distinguish him from his uncle. Moses C. Lee, the subject, first appears at age six in Census records in the  1860 enumeration of his father’s household in Berrien County, GA.  His father’s real estate was valued at 3500 and personal estate at $3800.

On November 1879, Moses C. Lee married Amanda Clements in Berrien County, GA.   Born Sarah Amanda Clements, she was a daughter of  John F. Clements and Nancy Patten, and a sister of John Miles Clements.

The newlyweds made their home in a house on the farm of Moses’ father, John Levy (or Levi) Lee, where they were enumerated in the Census of 1880.

After the death of his father, John Levy Lee, in 1884, Moses Lee carried on working his Berrien County farm.  Moses Lee’s residence was known as “Stoney Hill,” according to William Green Avera.  The Lee place was situated on the road “from Milltown to Tyson Ferry on the Alapaha River just east of the present site of Alapaha.” This road passed the residences of John Studstill, first Sheriff of Berrien County; Judge J. H. Rowan; and Keefe and Bullocks Turpentine Still.

By 1896 Moses Lee was recognized as one of the leading farmers in this section.

Tifton Gazette, March 7, 1896 praises the work of Berrien County, GA farmer Moses Lee.

Tifton Gazette, March 7, 1896 praises the work of Berrien County, GA farmer Moses Lee.

Well, I have the results of what Mr. Mose Lee, has stored away, for another specimen of what can be obtained in the wiregrass region.  Will take corn first.  On his farm he housed between 1500 and 2,000 bushels of “little cob” corn, and some where near 11,000 pounds of well cured fodder.  He dug and housed 12,000 bushels of sweet potatoes, and left enough in the patch to fatten 100 head of hogs. Cotton! cotton! He raised nineteen bales of cotton, averaging four hundred pounds each, which amounts to 7,600 pounds, and has jugged and barreled 750 gallons of syrup, of the finest that can be made.  He killed enough porkers to amount to 12,000 pounds and from them he obtained about 1,650 pounds of lard.  Hay he housed enough to winter 50 or 60 head of cows, beside old “Buck”.  As it was a bad year for oats and rice he only housed about 5,000 bundles of oats and 80 or 100 bushels of rice.
    He has enlarged his farm this year, by adding 40 acres of new land.  He is only going to use ten tons of guano this year.
    We hear some folks crying hard times, but all they have to do is to work with energy and vote for Hammond.  If anyone thinks that I have exaggerated in stating the above facts, I can only refer them to Mr. Lee, Milltown, Ga.

In 1917, M. C. Lee was employing Randolph Graham, John Thomas Brantley and Fletcher Turner to farm his land.

Children of Moses C. Lee and Amanda Clements Lee:

  1. William David Lee (1880 – 1967) married Mollie Clements
  2. Jennie L Lee (1882 – 1974)  married Sam I Watson, 1900
  3. Ellen D Lee (1883 – 1907) married William R. Smith; died of measles April 30, 1907
  4. John Vinson Lee (1885 – 1947) married Camilla Spence
  5. L. Chester Lee (1887 –1908) died of typhoid fever December 14, 1908
  6. Winnie Lee (1888-1891)
  7. Lena A Lee (1891 – 1971) married Willis Linton “Lint” Miller, 1913
  8. Remer E Lee (1893 – 1901) died of blood poisoning
  9. Mary Emma Lee (1895 –1986) married 1) Virgil Shingler; 2) J.Crawford Dasher
  10. Infant Lee – born and died July 22, 1897

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Watson Grade News Feb 12, 1904

“Trixie”  continued the reports on Watson Grade in the February 12, 1904 edition of the Tifton Gazette.  Watson Grade  was a small community near Empire Church just northeast of Ray’s Mill, GA.  It was the location of the Watson family farm and the home of Sam I. Watson, among others. Like the January Watson Grade News   this February update included several bits on the family of William and Betsy Patten, as well as reports of marriages and social news.

Tifton Gazette
February 12, 1904

Watson Grade News

The farmers are making big preparations for another crop-buying mules and clearing new grounds.
    Mr. Editor, your solution of the fertilizer question in last week’s issue is the only one that the farmer of today is actually in touch with. The farmers, not being systematically organized, are dependent in selling their products and buying their general supplies, and the only way to surpass this stupid state is for each and every farmer to work to the end of not having “everything to buy.”  Raise it at home; we have all the necessities if we will only use a little energy.
    Mr. M. C. Lee killed a porker last week that weighed 486, net.
    Mrs W. C. Patten has been quite sick with pneumonia, but is improving.
    Mr. J. P. Patten and Miss Fannie Patten were united in marriage Sunday afternoon at the home of the bride’s parents. Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Patten, near Milltown.  The bride is a sweet and lovable girl, and member of one of Berrien’s best families. The groom is an industrious young farmer of near this place.
    Inspector Tyler was in Milltown last week, looking after some rural routes from that place.  Of the three routes proposed, only two have the required number of families, the one passing through this place and the one through the Ray’s mill vicinity.
   Mr. Will Rouse and Miss Elsie Spell were united in marriage Wednesday afternoon, January 27th, at 3 o’clock, at the home of the bride’s parents, Judge J.  H. Rowan officiating. Both have many friends, who wish for them a long and prosperous journey through life.
    Mr. Jonah Register is quite sick with grippe at this writing.
    Mr. June Patten left last week to take charge of a school near Alapaha.
    Mr. Jos. Watson, who has been suffering with cancer for some time, is improving.
    Prof. W. G. Avera expects to move his family to Atlanta in a few days, his object being to educate his children.  Mr. Avera is one of Berrien’s oldest and best educators, and one of our best neighbors, and we see him go with much regret.

TRIXIE.

1904-feb-12-watson-grade-news

Additional Notes:

Moses C. Lee, a son of Elender Wetherington (1813-1889) and John Levy Lee, was one of the leading farmers of Berrien County.  His daughter, Jennie Lee, was the wife of Sam I. Watson. About 1917 his son, William David “Bill” Lee,  ordered a mail-0rder house from the Sears catalog, which he assembled just east of Ray’s Mill.

Mrs. William C. Patten in the article is Sarah E. Lee, a cousin of M.C. Lee mentioned above.  She was a daughter of Moses Corby Lee (1808-1884)   and  Jincy Register.

John P. Patten  was a son of James Patten (1832-1907) and Phoebe Mathis (1832-1898).  His bride was Fannie Patten, daughter of Matthew Elihu Patten  and Martha F. Williams (1847 – 1897). The Mrs. M. E. Patten mentioned in the article was Fannie’s  step-mother Minnie Archibald Patten.  John P. Patten died in 1911 and is buried at Union Church Cemetery, Lakeland, GA.

Will Rouse, of Rays Mill, and Elsie (or Elda?) Spells, of the 1300 Georgia Militia District, were married on January 27, 1904. The couple later made their home at Ray City for many years. The marriage ceremony was performed by Judge J. H. Rowan.  According to William Green Avera, the Judge’s place was on the road “from Milltown to Tyson Ferry on the Alapaha River just east of the present site of Alapaha.”  This road passed the residences of John Studstill, first Sheriff of Berrien County; Stoney Hill, residence of Moses C. Lee; and, Keefe and Bullocks Turpentine Still.

Jonah Register, son of John Register, was a young farmer of Berrien County, GA. He was suffering from grippe, a historical reference to the flu.  He later married Jane Cook, sister of Laura Cook and daughter of William Jackson Cook.  In the 1920s Jonah and Jane Register made their home in Ray City, GA.

Mr. June Patten was a son of Leanna and Irwin Patten.

Joseph Watson was the father of Samuel I Watson.

Professor William Green Avera was one of the most distinguished educators in Berrien County.

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