Doris Swindle, G.S.W.C.

Doris Swindle Smith (1916-1941)

Doris E. Swindle was born and raised in Ray City, GA.  She was the daughter of  Sarah Ellen  “Stell” Daniel and James Henry Swindle. Her father was a farmer and merchant of Ray City, and served in the Georgia House of Representatives in the 1930s.

Doris Swindle attended school in Ray City and graduated with the Ray City School Class of 1930. In 1934 and 1935 Doris Swindle attended Georgia State Womans College, now known as Valdosta State University, Valdosta GA.

Mrs. Doris Swindle Smith, 25, of Ray City and Jim I. Wisenbaker, of Lowndes county, were killed and five others were injured when two automobiles crashed Sunday night south of Valdosta.  Mrs. Smith was a daughter of J.H. Swindle, a former member of the Georgia Legislature, and Wisenbaker was a member of prominent Lowndes county family.

Grave marker of Doris Swindle (1916-1941), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, GA.

Grave marker of Doris Swindle (1916-1941), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, GA.

Related Posts:

Knight Sisters of Ray City

Laurie Inez Knight (left) and Ruby Texas Knight (right), of Ray City, GA.

Laurie Inez Knight (left) and Ruby Texas Knight (right), of Ray City, GA.

 Jimmie Gullette and Walter Howard Knight, subjects of previous posts, had four daughters: Julia Elizabeth Knight, Dollie Howard Knight, Ruby Texas Knight, and Laurie Inez Knight.

Grave of Julia Rigell Sloan, City Cemetery, Lakeland, Lanier County, GA

Grave of Julia Rigell Sloan, City Cemetery, Lakeland, Lanier County, GA

Julia Elizabeth Knight (1880 – 1955)
Julia Elizabeth Knight was born August 09, 1880 in Georgia.  She married twice.  Her first husband, David Jackson Rigell, was an early merchant of Ray’s Mill, GA (now Ray City, GA.)  They were married on March 19, 1901.   Sometime after Mr. Rigell’s death in 1911,  she married Dr. William David “Will” Sloan.  Julia Elizabeth Knight died September 10, 1955.

Grave of Dollie Howard Knight (1882 – 1956), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Grave of Dollie Howard Knight (1882 – 1956), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Dollie Howard Knight (1882 – 1956)
Dollie Howard Knight was born April 12, 1882. On October 28, 1900 she married “the boy next door,” Louis Malone Bullard , a son of Mary Ann and Green Bullard.  The Bullards lived on the east side of the Valdosta Road, in present day Lanier County. Dollie Knight Bullard died March 26, 1956, and was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Grave of Ruby Knight Johnson (1891 - 1977), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Grave of Ruby Knight Johnson (1891 – 1977), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Ruby Texas Knight (1891 – 1977)
Ruby Texas Knight  entered this world on October 11, 1891.  She was married to James Randall Johnson on April 21, 1910 and the couple made their home next door to her father’s place on the Valdosta Road, Ray City, Georgia.  Ruby Knight Johnson died June 17, 1977 and was interred at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia.

Grave of Laurie Knight Webb (1894 - 1974), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Grave of Laurie Knight Webb (1894 – 1974), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Laurie Inez Knight (1894 – 1974)
Laurie Inez Knight  was born April 9, 1894. She married Horace Webb in 1928.  They had a home on Charlton Street in Valdosta, GA where her husband worked as a furniture repair man. Laurie Knight Webb died April 1, 1974 and was buried next to her sister, Ruby, at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA

Knight Sisters of Ray City, GA. (L to R) Dollie Howard Knight, Julia Elizabeth Knight, Laurie Inez Knight, and Ruby Texas Knight.

Knight Sisters of Ray City, GA. (L to R) Dollie Howard Knight, Julia Elizabeth Knight, Laurie Inez Knight, and Ruby Texas Knight.

Dr. Sloan Had Ray City Roots

Dr. William David Sloan (image courtesy of http://berriencountyga.com/)

Dr. William David Sloan (1879 – 1935)  (image courtesy of http://berriencountyga.com/)

William David Sloan was born March 12, 1879 in the 1144 Georgia Militia District, the “Rays Mill District.” He was one of 11 children  born to Martha Susan Gordon and James Murray Sloan.

William David Sloan’s parents  came from North Carolina. His father moved the family from North Carolina to Mississippi for a brief stay, then to Echols Co., Ga.; thence to Berrien County, GA in 1871 where he engaged in farming. His father, James M. Sloan, a son of David and Diadema Sloan, was born January 18, 1833 in Duplin County, N.C., and  died November 20, 1894.

In 1897,  W. D. Sloan went with Lane Young to Thomasville, GA to study at  Stanley’s Business College.  The census of 1900 shows 21-year-old William  back in the Rays Mill District living in the household of his widowed mother .  She owned the family farm, free and clear of mortgage, which she worked on her own account, with the assistance of farm laborer Charlie Weaver. William’s mother, Mrs. Martha Susannah Gordon Sloan, died Oct. 25, 1908.

Julia Elizabeth Knight Ridgell, widow of David Rigell, married Dr. William Sloan.

Julia Elizabeth Knight Ridgell  (photo circa 1910), widow of David Rigell, married Dr. William Sloan.

In 1907 William received a scholarship from the Governor.  The August 28, 1907  issue of the Atlanta Constitution noted that W. D. Sloan, of Milltown, had been appointed by the governor to receive a scholarship at the Medical College of Georgia.

He moved to Augusta, GA where he studied medicine at the  University of Georgia’s Medical Department, now known as Georgia Regents University. He graduated from UGA with a medical degree in 1910 and went into general practice, working on his own account.  At the time he was boarding in the household of Charles Conner, of Watkins Street, Augusta, GA.

William David Sloan returned to Berrien County, GA and sometime after 1911 married Julia Elizabeth Knight Rigell.  She was the widow of David Rigell, an early merchant of Rays Mill, GA. She was born August 9, 1880, a daughter of Walter Knight and Jimmie Gullette.

Dr. William David Sloan and Julia Knight Rigell Sloan. (Image courtesy of http://berriencountyga.com/)

Dr. William David Sloan and Julia Knight Rigell Sloan. (Image courtesy of http://berriencountyga.com/)

William David Sloan enlisted in the Army Medical Service in 1917, and served during World War I.

Dr. William David Sloan, Army Medical Service, WWI. (image courtesy of http://berriencountyga.com/)

Dr. William David Sloan, Army Medical Service, WWI. (image courtesy of http://berriencountyga.com/)

Dr. Sloan later made his home in Stockton, GA but often visited his many family connections in the Ray City area. In September 1925, he happened to be on hand when little Merle Elizabeth Langford suffered a fatal rattlesnake bite. (Ray City Child Dies From Bite Of Rattle Snake, 1925)

Dr. William David Sloan and his automobile. Dr. Sloan was born and raised in the Rays Mill, GA vicinity.

Dr. William David Sloan and his automobile. Dr. Sloan was born and raised in the Rays Mill, GA vicinity.

In his later years Dr. Sloan suffered from kidney and heart disease.

The Journal of the American Medical Association, March 2, 1935 issue reported the obituary of William David Sloan.

William David Sloan, Stockton, Ga. ; University of Georgia
Medical Department, Augusta, 1910; served during the World
War ; aged 55 ; died, January 10, in a hospital at Atlanta, of
chronic nephritis and heart disease.

He was buried at Wayfare Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, in Echols County, Georgia.

Grave of William David Stone (1879-1935, Wayfare Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Echols County, GA.

Grave of William David Sloan, M.D. (1879-1935), Wayfare Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Echols County, GA.

Julia Rigell Sloan died September 10, 1955.  She was buried at the City Cemetery in Lakeland, GA  next to the grave of her infant daughter, born February 3, 1907.

 

Grave of Julia Rigell Sloan, City Cemetery, Lakeland, Lanier County, GA

Grave of Julia Rigell Sloan, City Cemetery, Lakeland, Lanier County, GA

 

Related Posts:

 

Ray City Women Among Dress Revue Winners

An old newspaper clipping covered Ray City women modeling the latest fashions.

Home Demonstration Council Dress Revue, Berrien County, GA

Home Demonstration Council Dress Revue, Berrien County, GA

BERRIEN HOME DEMONSTRATION COUNCIL DRESS REVUE WINNERS
Mrs. J. R. Johnson, Ray City, Suit; Mrs. R. A. Webb, Stylish Stouts, New Lois; Mrs. W. E. Griffin,  Street, Flat Creek; Mrs. E. L. Mobley, Ray City, County winner; Mrs. Terrell Swindle, Allenville, Church Dress; Mrs. Wallace Conner, Avera Mill, Special Occasion.  Mrs. Mobley will represent Berrien County in state wide dress revue August 27 at the State H. D. Council meeting to be held at the University of Georgia Campus, Athens.  Mrs. Conner is alternate.

Mrs. R. A. Webb = Pearlie Ann Register, daughter of Marion Register and Elizabeth L. Parrish Register, and a granddaughter of Ansel Parrish and Molcy Knight. She and her husband, James Alford Webb, lived many years in Ray City and Berrien County.

Mrs. Wallace Conner = Bonnie Lewis, daughter of J. Lonnie Lewis and Mittylene Phillips Lewis. Her husband, Wallace Donald Conner,  was the last miller to operate Avera Mill. He was a son of Ray City residents James Wilson Lewis and Pearlie Sutton Conner.

Related Posts:

Levi J. Knight and the Confederate Payroll Fraud

As previous posts have noted, family historians of Berrien County, GA have struggled with the confusion of the two Confederate officers named Levi J. Knight. Apparently, even during the war, the Confederate States Army suffered the same confusion.

In July 1861, Captain Levi J. Knight, early pioneer of Ray City and Berrien County, called for 100 volunteers to go with him to the fight for the Confederacy. These men were mustered into Confederate service during the summer of 1861 at Big Shanty, Georgia and joined the 29th Georgia Volunteer Infantry as the Berrien Minute Men.  This company traveled to Savannah where they trained and served near the Georgia coast. Levi J. Knight became Captain. Later,  while stationed with “companies at Advanced Batteries, Savannah River, GA, commanded by Lieut. Col. Edward C. Anderson, C. S. Artillery,” he was promoted to Major of the 29th Regiment.

Knight, at 58 years of age and suffering from asthma, did not serve through the war. On May 14th, 1862 he retired from service and returned to his home.

Three months after L. J. Knight’s separation from the Confederate States Army, questions arose about pay he had received while serving as Captain of  Company A, 29th Georgia Regiment.    The  Quartermaster General, A.C. Myers, reported the matter on August 12, 1862.

               Quarterms Genl’s Office
                               August 12th 1862

Gen’l
As required by pas.
1086 Army Regulations I have
to report to you that Capt.
Levi J. Knight, Co. “A”, 29th
Reg. Geo. Vols., has twice drawn
pay from Maj. L. J. Smith,
Qtr Msr., for the month of
October 1861. He was first
paid Oct. 31. & again Nov.
25th 1861

                 Very Respectfully
                          Yr Obd Servt
                            A. C. Myers
                           Qr Msr Genl

Gen’l L. Cooper
       Adj’s & Inspt Genl
               C. S. Army

1862 letter from the Adjutant General's Office alledging that Levi J. Knight defrauded the government of the Confederate States of America by drawing pay twice for the same month.

1862 letter from the Adjutant General’s Office alleging that Levi J. Knight defrauded the government of the Confederate States of America by drawing pay twice for the same month.

On August 14, 1862, Jasper S. Whiting, Major & assistant Adjutant General,  ” Respectfully referred [the matter] to Maj Genl E.K.Smith Mercer,  Savannah Geo., Commanding , who will call the attention of Capt Knight, Co “A” 29th Regt Geo Vols & ask for explanation. By command of the Secy of War.”

At the Savannah Headquarters of  Brigadier General Mercer, responsibility for the investigation was overseen by Captain George A. Mercer, Assistant Adjutant General.  Captain Mercer  further delegated responsibility for the investigation to Colonel Edward C. Anderson, 29th Georgia Regiment.

Hd Qrs Dist. Geo
Savannah, Aug 27th, 1862

Respectfully referred to Col Anderson
who will investigate and report upon the
charge against Capt Knight
       By order Brig. Genl Mercer
          Geo. A. Mercer
                         AAG

Apparently, Colonel Anderson was familiar with the case and was able to make a quick response to Captain Mercer.

Savannah 27th Augst 1862

Captain Geo A Mercer
Adj Genls Office

Captain I have made
inquiry concerning the matter referred to me in
the communication of Augst 12th from Quarter Master
Genls Office. Captain Levi J. Knight Commandg
Company G. 29th Regt Ga Vols at present serving
with me, was elected to his present position
on the reorganization  in May & at the time
specified viz October 1861,  was not a Captain. 
Company C 29th Regt was first commanded by an 
officer of the same name – Capt Levi J Knight
(afterwards Major) then by Capt Wylly & now
L.J. Knight Jr – the nephew of the former Capt
Knight.
    I learn that Majr L. J. Knight made
two companies, called the Berrien Minute Men,
lettered respectively A & B. These companies
were commanded by Capt Knight Senr.  Last fall,
on the reorganization of the Regt in May, Majr
Knight retired from the service & is now
in Civil Life.  I have no doubt the error
must have occurred unwittingly as he
bears the character of an honest old man.
Connetion with him was brief & entirely official
in its character.  He commanded the outpost
companies at MacKays Point.

                                     Very Respectfully
                                               Yoobst
                                    Edwd C. Anderson
                                          Col Comdg

Colonel Edward C. Anderson letter of August 27, 1862 explaining confusion over the two officers of the Berrien Minute Men named Levi J. Knight.

Colonel Edward C. Anderson letter of August 27, 1862 explaining confusion over the two officers of the Berrien Minute Men named Levi J. Knight.

Colonel Edward C. Anderson letter of August 27, 1862 concerning Levi J. Knight and the Berrien Minute Men, Page 2

Colonel Edward C. Anderson letter of August 27, 1862 concerning Levi J. Knight and the Berrien Minute Men, Page 2

 Subsequently, Capt George A. Mercer wrote a letter “informing Levi J. Knight  that he will forward any papers to Richmond in reference to his case.”

Confederate States of America
Head Quarters Military District of Georgia
Savannah, Aug 28th, 1862

L.J. Knight Esq
      Dear Sir
             I am directed by Genl. Mercer
to call your attention to the enclosed papers and
to request that you will return them to this office.
Genl. Mercer will of course report to the War
Department that you are no longer in the service
and therefore not subject to his control : he will
however gladly forward any explanation you may de-
sire to make to the Authorities at Richmond.

I am Sir Very Respy
Your Obdt Servt
Geo. A. Mercer
AAG

Captain George A. Mercer letter of August 28, 1862 to Levi J. Knight offering him the opportunity to respond to allegations that he drew double pay while serving as Captain of the Berrien Minute Men.

Captain George A. Mercer letter of August 28, 1862 to Levi J. Knight offering him the opportunity to respond to allegations that he drew double pay while serving as Captain of the Berrien Minute Men.

    On September 6, 1862 Levi J. Knight wrote a response to Captain Mercer indicating that he never drew double pay and that the error must be in the bookkeeping of the Quartermaster Generals Office.

                          Lowndes County Sept 6th 1862

Capt Geo A Mercer
Agt Genl Officer

                                                    Captain yours dated 27th
concerning charges from Richmond that I had drawn
pay twice as captain for the month of October 1861
has been read and is now before me.  I cannot see how
any error can have taken place except it should be in
the dates.  I was mustered in as Captain the 1st of August
1861 and drew my pay as such from Maj Smith for
the months of August September and October 1861 at
three different times. I afterward drew as captain for
six days for the month of November  – and for the ballance
of that month as Major and drew my pay as Major
up to the 30th of April at the reorganization.  I retired the
14th of May last and am now at my residence in Lowndes
county.  I know I drew only for three months and six
days.  Two of the requisitions may have been dated October
and none for September. This I know that I drew only
what was due me as Captain for the time I served as
such.

                                                        Very Respectfully Yours
                                                         Levi J. Knight

Levi J. Knight letter of September 9, 1862 to Captain George A. Mercer.

Levi J. Knight letter of September 9, 1862 to Captain George A. Mercer.

Isbin T. Giddens Dies of Brain Fever at Guyton Hospital, Georgia

Isbin T. Giddens and Matthew O. Giddens were the two youngest sons of Isbin Giddens, a pioneer settler of the Ray City, GA area.  The Giddens brothers served together in the Civil War.  They joined Levi J. Knight’s company of Berrien Minute Men, Company G, 29th Georgia Infantry at Milltown (nka Lakeland), GA.  Neither would survive the war.

Gravemarker of Matthew O. Giddens, Camp Chase, Ohio

Mathew O. Giddens, a subject of previous posts (Matthew O. Giddens ~ Confederate POW), fought with the Berrien Minute Men for more than three years before he was taken prisoner on December 16, 1864 near Nashville, TN. He was imprisoned at Camp Chase, Ohio where he died three months later. Federal records of deaths of Confederate prisoners of war show that M. O. Giddens, 29th GA Infantry, died of pneumonia on February 7, 1865 at Camp Chase. He was buried in  one of 2260 confederate graves at Camp Chase Cemetery.

Isbin T. Giddens became a corporal in Company G, 29th Georgia Infantry Regiment, the Berrien Minute Men.  He was enlisted at Savannah, GA on August 1, 1861. From August 1, 1861 to Feb, 1862 confederate military records show he was present with his unit.

Whether in the P.O.W. camps or in regimental camps, Confederate soldiers like Mathew and Isbin Giddens were under constant risk for disease.  In early December of 1861, soldiers of the Berrien Minute Men wrote home that there was an outbreak of measles in the camp of the 29th Regiment. In late December,  the measles outbreak was even worse. By July of 1862 letters home from the Berrien Minute Men told of diseases spreading throughout the confederate camps: chills and fever, mumps, diarrhea and typhoid fever.

That summer, Isbin T. Giddens had made the rank 2nd Sergeant, Company G, but by July he was himself gravely ill.  He was sent to the Confederate general hospital at Guyton, GA about twenty miles south of Savannah. (Note: This community was also known as Whitesville, Georgia. See Guyton History.)

Soldiers of Berrien County  helped in the construction of the hospital at Guyton.  In a letter dated May 18, 1862, Sergeant Ezekiel Parrish wrote to his father James Parrish (1816-1867) that a construction recruiter had visited him in Savannah, GA:

“Father I think now that I shall go up to Whiteville at No three on the C R R to help build a government hospital.   There was a man here this morning that has the management of that work after hands and for the improvement of my health which is growing bad I think I shall go and work there a few weeks.  The water here is very bad and brackish and a continual use of it is enough to make anybody sick.   I  do not go up to No 3 I shall write to you soon…”

Ezekiel Parrish  made it to Guyton hospital at Whiteville. His Confederate service records show he was among the Berrien County men he was detached in May 1862 for carpentry work at the hospital. Another was Matthew A. Parrish,  of Company I, 50th GA Regiment.

But within three weeks time Ezekiel Parrish’s health took a turn for the worse.  He was himself admitted to the hospital and died of measles pneumonia, June 5, 1862 at Whitesville, GA.  Matthew A. Parrish would not long survive him; he died October 21, 1862 in Berrien County, GA.

The historical marker at Guyton bears the inscription:

In May 1862 the Confederate Government established a General Hospital in Guyton, Georgia. This hospital was located on a nine acre tract of land between Central Railroad, a determining factor in locating hospitals, and current Georgia Highway 119, Lynn Bonds Avenue and Pine Street. The end of May saw five people on the medical staff at this hospital. Five months later the number had reached 46 people including surgeons, assistant surgeons, contract physicians, hospital stewards, ward masters, matrons, ward matrons, assistant matrons, nurses, cooks, and laundry workers. By May 1863, this hospital had a medical staff of 67 people. Confederate documents reveal that this hospital had 270 beds and 46 fireplaces. When the hospital was filled to capacity the Guyton Methodist Church was used to take in patients who could not be placed in the hospital. Surgeon William H. Whitehead was the Surgeon-in-Charge from May 1862 until February 1863, when Surgeon William S. Lawton took charge and served in this capacity until the hospital was abandoned in December 1864, when the 17th Army Corps of General Sherman`s Federal Army approached. From May 1862 to December 1864, this hospital provided medical care, food, clothing, and lodging for thousands of sick and wounded Confederate soldiers.

The assignment to Guyton hospital perhaps gave Isbin Giddens  a better than average chance of surviving his illness.  In Surgical Memoirs of the War of the Rebellion, Volume 2, issued 1871, Guyton Hospital was described as one of the most effective of the general hospitals in Confederate Georgia.  Patients at Guyton were far more likely to survive gunshot wounds or disease than soldiers sent to other Georgia hospitals.

The excess of mortality in the general hospitals of Savannah and Macon, Georgia, over that of Guyton, was clearly referable in great measure to the hygienic conditions and relative locations of the various hospitals…In the crowded hospitals, the simplest diseases assumed malignant characters; the typhoid poison altered the course of mumps and measles, and pneumonia, and was the cause of thousands of deaths; and the foul exhalations of the sick poisoned the wounds of healthy men, and induced erysipelas, pyaemia, and gangrene.  Who can estimate the suffering inflicted, as in the celebrated case of the Augusta hospitals, by the development and spread of hospital gangrene in overcrowded hospitals situated in the heart of towns and cities?
     As a rule in military practice, the wounded should never be placed in wards with patients suffering from any one of the contagious or infectious diseases, as small-pox, measles, scarlet fever, typhus fever, typhoid fever, erysipelas, pyaemia, or hospital gangrene; and these various diseases should not be indiscriminately mingled together. The voice of the profession is unanimous as to the exclusion and isolation of small-pox, but we know from extended experience that sufficient care was not exercised in the isolation of other diseases.

Despite the hospital’s better record with disease, Isbin T. Giddens died of “Brain Fever”  on July 17, 1862 at Guyton Hospital. The term Brain fever, no longer in use, described a medical condition where a part of the brain becomes inflamed and causes symptoms that present as fever.   In modern terminology, conditions that may have been described as brain fever include Encephalitis, an acute inflammation of the brain, commonly caused by a viral infection, or Meningitis, the inflammation of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord.  Giddens died with no money in his possession.  His effects, “sundries”, where left in the charge of W.S. Lawton, Surgeon and later,Surgeon-in-Chief. His place of burial was not documented.

Isbin T. Giddens, register of deaths by disease, Confederate Archives

Isbin T. Giddens, register of deaths by disease, Confederate Archives

Related Posts:

 

Samuel G. Guthrie of Ray City, GA

Sam Guthrie

Samuel G. Guthrie of Ray City, GA with an unidentified friend.

Samuel G. Guthrie, of Ray City, GA, photographed in Florida with an unidentified friend.

Samuel G. Guthrie Dies in Brunswick; Burial at Ray City

      Samuel G. Guthrie, well known and highly regarded Ray City and Berrien county man, passed away Tuesday, January 9, in the Brunswick Hospital following a heart attack. He was 44 years of age.
     A son of Mrs. Lucy Newbern Guthrie and the late A. H. Guthrie of Ray City, the deceased was born and reared in Berrien county and had spent practically all his life here. He had lived in Brunswick about one year where he held a position in the shipyards.  He was a member of the Baptist church.
     Funeral services were held at the New Ramah church in Ray City Wednesday afternoon, January 10, at 4:30 o’clock, conducted by Elder Charlie Vickers of Nashville, and Elder Orville Knight of Valdosta.  Burial was in the church cemetery.
     A choir composed of N. H. Harper, Mrs. J. I. Clements Sr., Mrs. H. P. Clements and Mrs. Jack Cribb sang two songs, “Asleep In Jesus,” and “Rock of Ages.”
     Pall-bearers were Carroll V. Guthrie, June Eroll Purvis, Emmis Purvis, Archie Peacock, Rudolph Moore and A. T. King.
     Surviving besides his mother, there are four brothers and five sisters,  June Guthrie and Herman Guthrie of Jacksonville, Fla., P. T. Guthrie of Lakeland, and John Guthrie of Ray City, Mrs. J. R. King of Nashville, Mrs. Marvin Purvis, Mrs. O. A. Knight, Mrs. Rossie Futch, and Miss Bettye Guthrie of Ray City.

Samuel G. Guthrie (1900-1945), New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Samuel G. Guthrie (1900-1945), New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

 

Related posts:

 

Ola Crews and Otis Mikell

The Minutes of the One Hundred Twentieth Annual Session of the Union Primitive Baptist Association, October 18-20, 1975 noted the passing of Ola Crews Mikell:

MEMORIAL COMMITTEE

WE, YOUR COMMITTEE ON MEMORIALS BEG TO SUBMIT OUR REPORT IN LOVING MEMORY OF OUR DEAR DECEASED MEMBERS WHO HAVE BEEN CALLED AWAY SINCE OUR LAST SESSION.

…SISTER LEALA MIKELL WAS BORN SEPT. 14, 1891, MARRIED BROTHER O.W. MIKELL MARCH 7, 1909, UNITED WITH OLIVE LEAF CHURCH SEPT. 1911, CAME TO NEW RAMAH CHURCH BY LETTER FEB. 12, 1916, DEPARTED THIS LIFE FEB 14, 1975.

IT IS WITH MUCH SADNESS THAT WE RECORD THESE MEMORIALS, BUT WE SAY TO ALL THAT MOURN THEIR PASSING, WE SHARE IN YOUR LOSS, BUT WE BELIEVE THAT OUR LOSS IS THEIR ETERNAL GAIN, OUR PRAYERS THAT GOD’S RICHEST BLESSINGS WILL FILL THE EMPTINESS THAT IS LEFT BY THEIR ABSENCE.

Anne Leola “Ola” Crews was born in Clinch County, GA on   September 14, 1891, the eldest child of Perry Crews and Rhoda Guthrie. She appeared with her family in the Census of 1900 in the Mud Creek district of Clinch County. Her father was working a rented farm there.

In 1909, Ola Crews married Otis Willie Mikell in Clinch County.  Born April 8, 1885 in Berrien County, he was a tall and slender young man, with dark hair and blue eyes.  His  mother was Rebecca Lee (1845-1932). His father, John A. Mikell (1848-1889), served terms as Justice of the Peace, Road commissioner, and Deputy Sheriff in Clinch County, GA.

Otis Mikell and Ola Crews marriage certificate.

Otis Mikell and Ola Crews marriage certificate.

While the Clinch County marriage license clearly shows that O.W. Mikell and Ola Crews were joined in matrimony on March 7, 1909, census records from this period are confusing.

On the one hand, it appears that Ola continued to live with her mother for some time after her marriage.  In the 1910 census of of the Mud Creek district, Ola Crews was enumerated on April 19 in her widowed mother’s household, under her maiden name, as a single female.  Her mother, Rhoda Crews, was head-of-household, a farmer, working her land on her own account.

On the other hand, the census of Militia District 1280 in Clinch County, enumerated in May, 1910 shows  O.W. Mikell as head of household with his wife, Ola Mikell, married one year.  Otis and Ola were renting a house on the farm owned by his mother. Otis’ brother, George Calhoun Mikell,  and his family were renting the house next door.

Ola and Otis Mikell were members of the Primitive Baptist faith.  Church records show that Ola Mikell united with Olive Leaf Primitive Baptist Church near Dupont, GA in September, 1911.

Some time before 1916, Otis and Ola moved to Ray City, GA. On February 12, 1916 Ola joined with New Ramah Church at Ray City by letter.  The WWI draft registration records show Otis worked as a farmer at M.C. Lee’s place.

In the Census of 1920, Otis W. Mikell was renting a farm on a settlement road near Ray City.  By this time, the Otis and Ola’s household included their five children: Annie C., Alvin L., Cleo,  and the twins  Clementine and Pauline. Also in the Mikell home was Otis’ brother, Augustus.  Farming next door was  John Troutman from Bavaria, Germany, and boarding with him was the Primitive Baptist preacher, Alfred F. Fender.

In the 1930s,  Otis and Ola  were renting a farm and raising their children in the Lois district, near Ray City.

Children of Ola Crews and Otis Mikell:

  1. Annie Clarice Mikell 1911 – December 12, 2002
  2. Alvin Lee Mikell 1913 – 1987
  3. Lula Cleo Mikell, April 4, 1915 – October 27, 2013
  4. Pauline Mikell 1919 – 2006
  5. Clementine Mikell 1919 – 1992
  6. Ola Mae Mikell 1929 –

 

Otis Mikell died February 19, 1958. Ola Crews Mikell died Feb 14, 1975. They are both buried at New Ramah Cemetery in Ray City, along with others  of the Mikell family connection.

Ola Crews and Otis Mikell, New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, GA

Ola Crews and Otis Mikell, New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, GA

George W. Bush Flew Ray City Skies

George Walker Bush graduated from flight school at Moody Air Force Base near Ray City, GA

George Walker Bush graduated from flight school at Moody Air Force Base near Ray City, GA.

President George W. Bush: Military Pilot

In the winter of 1968 while a senior at Yale , George  Walker Bush went to Westover Air Force Base in Massachusetts to be tested as a pilot candidate.  He joined the Texas Air Guard on May 27, 1968, with the rank of Airman Basic and began basic training next day at Lackland Air Force Base near San Antonio. He served as an enlisted man in “active duty for training” for three months. On September 4, 1968, he was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant and assigned to the 111th Fighter Interceptor Squadron (147th FI Group) at Ellington AFB near Houston.

On November 21, 1968 he was sent to the 3550th Student Squadron at Moody AFB in Georgia for flight training. If he followed the usual regimen, he would have flown 30 hours in a T-41–a military version of the familiar Cessna 172 –before advancing to T-37 and T-38 jet trainers. At the end of his first year in the Air Guard, his 201 (personnel) file credited him with 226 days as an officer. Adding 95 days as an enlisted man, he served nearly eleven months during his first year in the Air Guard.

Did George W. Bush ever visit Ray City, GA while he was stationed at Moody AFB? Many pilots do. He certainly would have flown the skies over town as he made the final approach for landings at the base

Did George W. Bush visit Ray City, GA while he was stationed at Moody AFB? Many pilots do. He certainly would have flown the skies over town as he made the final approach for landings at the base

Bush graduated No. 23 out of the 53 pilots in his class at Moody. His father, then a Texas Congressman, gave the squadron’s commencement speech in November 1969. On November 30, 1969, Bush returned to the 111th FIS at Ellington AFB and received his pilot’s wings in March 1970.

Pentagon records released in September 2004 show that Bush flew a total of 326.4 hours as pilot-in-command over the three years 1970-1972. In addition, he was credited with 9.9 hours as co-pilot, presumably in a two-seat TF-102A trainer while qualifying to fly the supersonic jet. The records show Bush’s last flight was in April 1972.

Military Record of George W. Bush

Military Record of George W. Bush

Aircraft flown during 1968 Flight School at  Moody Air Force Base

The T-41 trainer is a standard Cessna Model 172 light general aviation aircraft purchased "off-the-shelf" by the Air Force for preliminary flight screening of USAF pilot candidates. The first 170 T-41As were ordered in 1964, and an additional 34 were ordered in 1967. Most went into service at various civilian contract flight schools, each located near one of Air Training Command's Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) bases. In 1968 and 1969 the USAF Academy acquired 52 T-41Cs, with more powerful engines, for cadet flight training.

The T-41 trainer is a standard Cessna Model 172 light general aviation aircraft purchased “off-the-shelf” by the Air Force for preliminary flight screening of USAF pilot candidates. The first 170 T-41As were ordered in 1964, and an additional 34 were ordered in 1967. Most went into service at various civilian contract flight schools, each located near one of Air Training Command’s Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) bases. In 1968 and 1969 the USAF Academy acquired 52 T-41Cs, with more powerful engines, for cadet flight training.

Cessna T-37 Tweet. From 1961 to 1975 there were no changes in the mission or responsibilities at Moody. The 3550th, under the Consolidated Pilot Training Program, trained Air Force officers as aircrew members with the Cessna T-37 and T-38. During this 14 years, 4,432 pilots were trained and received their wings. Base personnel strength varied during the period from 2,000 to 3,000 military personnel. On 1 December 1973, the 3550th Pilot Training Wing inactivated and the 38th Flying Training Wing activated in its place; however, no changes in personnel, mission, or aircraft ensued.

Cessna T-37 Tweet. From 1961 to 1975 there were no changes in the mission or responsibilities at Moody. The 3550th, under the Consolidated Pilot Training Program, trained Air Force officers as aircrew members with the Cessna T-37 and T-38. During this 14 years, 4,432 pilots were trained and received their wings. Base personnel strength varied during the period from 2,000 to 3,000 military personnel. On 1 December 1973, the 3550th Pilot Training Wing inactivated and the 38th Flying Training Wing activated in its place; however, no changes in personnel, mission, or aircraft ensued.

Northrop T-38 Talon. The T-38 Talon is a twin-engine, high-altitude, supersonic jet trainer used in a variety of roles because of its design, economy of operations, ease of maintenance, high performance and exceptional safety record. It is used primarily by Air Education and Training Command for undergraduate pilot and pilot instructor training. Air Combat Command, Air Mobility Command and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration also use the T-38 in various roles. The instructor and student sit in tandem on rocket-powered ejection seats in a pressurized, air-conditioned cockpit. Student pilots fly the T-38A to learn supersonic techniques, aerobatics, formation, night and instrument flying and cross-country navigation. More than 60,000 pilots have earned their wings in the T-38A.

Northrop T-38 Talon. The T-38 Talon is a twin-engine, high-altitude, supersonic jet trainer used in a variety of roles because of its design, economy of operations, ease of maintenance, high performance and exceptional safety record. It is used primarily by Air Education and Training Command for undergraduate pilot and pilot instructor training. Air Combat Command, Air Mobility Command and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration also use the T-38 in various roles. The instructor and student sit in tandem on rocket-powered ejection seats in a pressurized, air-conditioned cockpit. Student pilots fly the T-38A to learn supersonic techniques, aerobatics, formation, night and instrument flying and cross-country navigation. More than 60,000 pilots have earned their wings in the T-38A.

Related posts:

More on Andrew Washington Turner and Phoebe Isabelle Sirmans

Andrew W. Turner was married to Phoebe Isabelle Sirmans on March 27, 1892

Andrew W. Turner was married to Phoebe Isabelle Sirmans on March 27, 1892

Andrew Washington Turner, a subject of previous posts  (Andrew Washington Turner and Phoebe Isabelle Sirmans, Ray City News, Jan 3, 1929 ~ M.G. Melton Buys A. Turner Brick Bldgs. ), was born January 1, 1867 in Dublin, GA.  He was the son of Adeline Rebecca Black Reddick and Jesse Turner.  His  mother had been previously married to Captain Daniel Reddick, who was a sea captain engaged in trade along coastal Georgia.  Andrew had two half-siblings who were fathered by Captain Reddick; Susan Reddick and William D. Reddick.

At age 4, Andrew appeared with his family in the 1870 census of Militia District 344, Laurens, Georgia.  His father was a farmer there with $500 in real estate and personal estate valued at $450.  Andrew’s half-brother, enumerated as William D. R. Turner, worked as a farm laborer.   Also in the household was Andrew’s older sister, Henrietta (age 6).

Andrew’s father, Jesse Turner, died some time prior to 1880.  The 1880 US Census shows Andrew Turner,  living with his twice-widowed mother, half-sister Susan (Henrietta ?), and sister Mary Reddick.  They were then living in Berrien County, GA Militia District 1144, in the vicinity of Rays Mill.  Andrew, then age 14, “works on the farm,” the census noted.

It was in  Berrien County, GA that Andrew W. Turner was married to Phoebe Isabelle Sirmans on March 27, 1892.   She was born June 1, 1867, a daughter of Frances Sutton and  Abner Sirmans.  On February 24, 1893, Andrew Turner and his wife bought land from her father, Abner Sirmans. On this land, situated in the Rays Mill community (later Ray City, Georgia), the newlyweds made their home.

In 1900,  the census shows Rebecca Turner living with her son Andrew W. Turner and family in Rays Mill, Berrien, GA and notes that Rebecca was blind.

Andrew and Phoebe Isabella Turner were among the first members of the Ray City Methodist Church, which was organized on October 29, 1910.  Other organizing members were Mr. and Mrs. Will Clements,  Mr. and Mrs. W.F. Luckie, Will Terry, Mrs. Julia Dudley, Annie Lee Dudley, and Marie Dudley.

In 1910  Andrew Turner was working on his own account as a farmer.  Mrs. Turner’s widower father, Abner Sirmans, was living with the Turner family in Ray City,  but had his own income.

Andrew and Phoebe Isabelle raised their family in Ray City, GA.  Between 1892 and 1911, they had nine children:

  1. Lona Belle Turner (3/30/1893 – 5/10/1926) married Edward Holmes Sumner 10/28/1909 in Berrien County, GA, buried at Bethel Baptist Church Cemetery, Polk County, Florida.
  2. Rosa B. Turner (9/22/1894-9/23/1985) married Aubrey B. Shaw on 9/13/1914 ceremony performed by Lyman Franklin Giddens, Justice of the Peace, Ray City, GA. Rosa Turner is buried at Sunset Hill Cemetery, Valdosta, GA.
  3. Minnie Turner (7/5/1896 – 12/2/1987) married George I. Sumner on 12/22/1915, buried at Friendship Church Cemetery, Lowndes County, GA.
  4. Maggie Turner (12/25/1898 – 9/20/1980) married Burie Webster Clements on 5/5/1920, buried at Lakeland Memorial Gardens, Polk County, FL.
  5. Jesse Abner Turner (7/14/1900 – 10/3/1969) married Maude D. Yarbrough on 1/3/1920, buried at Friendship Church Cemetery, Lowndes County, GA.
  6. John S. Turner (8/25/1903 – 7/23/ 1984) married Florrie Olena Reynolds on 5/1/1927, buried at Riverside Cemetery, Macon, GA.
  7. Mittie Mae Turner (1/5/1907 – 10/23/1968) married F.H. “Mac” McColm, buried at Southern Memorial Park, Dade County, FL.
  8. Essie Turner (9/12/1909 – 2/11/1990) married 1) James Nathaniel Hall, 2) Tasca Luther Cole. Buried at Sunset Hill Cemetery, Valdosta, GA.
  9. William Theodore Turner (3/3/1911 – 9/10/1952) Never married. Buried at Sunset Hill Cemetery, Valdosta, GA.

The Turners made Ray City, GA their home through the 1920s.  The Census of 1920 gives Andrew’s occupation as “Cotton buyer” working on his own account.  His son, Jesse Turner, was working as a drayman, for public work. The family residence was located on North Street in Ray City, next to the homes of Levi J. Clements and Lucius J. Clements, operators of the Clements Sawmill.  Andrew Turner was also engaged in the in naval stores and the mercantile business.

In 1922, Andrew W. Turner dabbled in local politics:

Atlanta Constitution
Jan 11, 1922, pg 6

Ray City Officials

Milltown, Ga.,  January 10. – (Special.) – At the election for the town officers at Ray City.  Tuesday, the following were elected: Mayor, L.F. Giddens: councilmen. J.T. Phillips, A.W. TurnerJ.S. Clements, Jr., and J.A. Griffin.  They were installed immediately.

During the town’s boom period he constructed ”two large brick buildings known as the Andrew Turner Buildings.  One of the buildings is two stories high.”  In 1929, the Ray City News reported that this building was sold to M. G. Melton.

Sometime between 1922 and 1929 Andrew Turner purchased a farm situated between Hahira and Valdosta, GA and the family made this their home.  Around this same time period, he suffered a stroke which resulted in paralysis of his left side and impaired his speech.  He recovered use of his left leg sufficiently that he could walk with a cane, but his left arm remained paralyzed.  Andrew’s son, Jesse,  had married by this time but made his home near his father’s and ran the family farm.

Census records show that by 1930 the Turner family had relocated to Valdosta, GA to a home on Valley Street.   Andrew Turner rented the house for $20 a month:  Jesse Turner and his family apparently had an apartment in the same residence.  Andrew’s daughter,  Mittie, was working in a department store;  Jesse was working as an automobile mechanic.

Andrew Washington Turner died 1936.

Mr. Turner Dies After A Stroke
Valdosta Times
Monday, July 27, 1936.

      Funeral services for A. W. Turner, 69, well known resident of this county, who died at a local hospital last night as the result of a stroke of paralysis, will be held this afternoon at 6 oclock at Sunset Hill.
     The body was taken this morning from Sineath’s to the home of Mrs. A.B. Shaw, a daughter who resides at 305 West Gordon Street.
     Rev. L.H. Griffis, pastor of the Church of God, and Rev. C.M. Meeks, pastor of the First Methodist Church, will conduct the services. 
    Survivors are his wife and the following children: Mrs. A.B. Shaw and Miss Essie Turner, of this city; Mrs. G.I. Sumner, J.A. Turner and Theo Turner, of Hahira; J.S. Turner, of Porterdale; Miss Mittie Turner, of Miami; and Mrs. B.W. Clements, of Ft. Pierce.  A sister, Mrs. Mary Johnson, of Macon, also survives.
     Mr. Turner was for a number of years a merchant and cotton buyer in Ray City, but he had made his home in Hahira for a number of years before his death.  For the past two years he had been in ill health.
     His death is the occasion of much genuine sorrow throughout this section.

The Personal Mentions in the same edition of the newspaper noted:

Mr. and Mrs. P.N. Sirmans, Mr. and Mrs. Burns Sirmans, of Ray City, Mr. and Mrs. Terrel Sirmans,  and Mrs. Levi Sirmans of Nashville, were here yesterday to attend the funeral of Mr. A.W. Turner.

Phoebe Isabelle Sirmans Turner  died in 1948.

Mrs. A. W. Turner, 81, Passes Away;  Funeral Today
Valdosta Times
August 30, 1948

     Mrs. A.W. Turner, 81, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. A.B. Shaw, 401, N. Troupe Street, early Sunday morning after a declining illness of several months. She had made her home in Valdosta for about five years, moving here from Ray City.
     Mrs. Turner was born and reared in Berrien County.  She was a member of the Lee Street Church of God.
     Survivors include five daughters, Mrs. A.B. Shaw and Mrs. J.N. Hall, Valdosta; Mrs. B.W. Clements, Mulberry, Fla.;  Mrs. G.I. Sumner, Hahira, and Mrs. F.H. McCullum, Miami, Fla.; three sons John Turner, Columbus, Ga.; J.A. and Theo Turner, Hahira; two sisters, Mrs. Leona Douglas, Ocala, Fla.; and Mrs. Kitty Turner, of Ray City, Ga.  Also surviving are a number of grandchildren and great grandchildren.
     Funeral services were to be held this afternoon at 3 o’clock, at the Carson McLane Funeral Home.
     Interment was to follow in the family plot in Sunset Hill beside her husband, who passed away several years ago.

Related posts:

« Older entries