Roster of Company D, 3rd Regiment Georgia Infantry U.S. Volunteers

In  1898, nowhere was there greater fervor for the Spanish-American War than in Georgia.  “When the United States became involved in war with Spain, Georgia furnished according to population more volunteers than any other State of the Union.”

A number of Berrien County, GA men volunteered for service in the U.S. Army.

Walter A. Griner, Carl R. O’QuinnPythias D. Yapp,, Zachary T. Hester, W. Dutchman Stephens, Samuel Z.T. Lipham, James M. Bridges, Charles A. Courson, Love Culbreath, George C. Flowers, James L. Jordan and George A. Martin all enlisted in Company D, 3rd Georgia Regiment, U.S. Volunteers. Aaron Cook served as a private in Company E, Third Regiment, U.S. Volunteer Infantry. Other Berrien countians serving in the Third Regiment were Luther Lawrence Hallman and William F. Patten, both in Company B.

Company D, 3rd Georgia Infantry, US Volunteers, Spanish-American War. Image source: http://www.spanamwar.com/3rdGeorgia.htm

The Third Regiment was organized at Camp Northen, Griffin, GA over the summer of 1898 and mustered into the service of the United States on August 24, 1898 with 43 officers and 1,243 enlisted men. The Third Regiment was assigned to Second Brigade, Third Division, Second Army Corps on October 7, 1898. The regiment left Griffin November 21 and arrived at Savannah November 22, 1898. It appears the Third Regiment  encamped at Camp Onward, awaiting embarkation. They sailed from Savannah on S.S. Roumania on Friday the 13th of January, 1899; arrived at Nuevitas, Cuba, January 18; changed station to Minas, Cuba January 30 and February 1. The regiment sailed from Nuevitas March 25, 1899 and arrived at Augusta, GA, March 29, 1899. The Third Regiment Mustered out of the service of the United States at Augusta, GA, April 22, 1899, with 46 officers and 945 enlisted men. Casualties while in the service: Officers – died of disease, 1; Enlisted men -died of disease, 24; killed by accident, 1; deserted, 50. – Correspondence Relating to the War With Spain

 

Company D, 3rd Georgia Infantry, US Volunteers
Muster Roll

  1. Stewart, Henry J. Captain. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 28; born, Rome, GA; occupation, Clerk; enlisted, Rome, GA, 1898-06-25; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 9, 1898 (later captain of Co. K, 43 Georgia Infantry US Vols); buried Myrtle Hill Cemetery, Rome, GA
  2. Brock, Benj. T. 1st Lieut. Residence, Trenton, GA; age, 32; born, Trenton, GA; occupation, Lawyer; enlisted, Trenton, GA, 1898-06-25; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 9, 1898; buried Brock Cemetery, Trenton, GA
  3. Land, Max E. 2nd Lieut.. Residence, Abbeville, GA; age, 26; born, Bullard, GA; occupation, Lawyer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, 1898-06-25; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 9, 1898; buried Sunnyside Cemetery, Cordele, GA
  4. Omberg, Frank Cleveland 1st Sgt.. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 21; born, Rome, GA; occupation, Bk-Keeper; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898; buried Rosemont Cemetery, Newberry, SC
  5. Culver, William H. Sgt. Residence, Atlanta, GA; age, 30; born, Greenville, GA; occupation, Mgr. Compress; enlisted, Atlanta, GA, July 13, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 16, 1898
  6. Baumgartner, Fred C. QM Sgt.; Residence, Rome, GA; age, 22; born, Knoxville, TN; occupation, Cabinet Maker; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; Mustered in Camp Northern, July 8, 1898; buried Myrtle Hill Cemetery, Rome, GA
  7. George, LaFayette F. Sgt. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 21; born, Rome, GA; occupation, Molder; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898; buried West Lawn Cemetery, Henryetta, OK.
  8. Logan, Eugene P. Sgt.. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 24; born, Rome, GA; occupation, Motorman; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  9. Gunn, Donald G. Sgt.. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 19; born, Rome, GA; occupation, Stone Cutter; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  10. Lipham, Samuel Z.T. Corporal. Residence, Sparks, GA; age, 21; born, Berrien County, GA; occupation, Lawyer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 16, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898; buried Dade City Cemetery, Dade City, FL
  11. Logan, Ernest J. Corporal. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 22; born, Rome, GA; occupation, Candy Maker; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  12. Porter, Bernard L. Corporal. Residence, Trenton, GA; age, 22; born, Trenton, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Trenton, GA, July 7, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 20, 1898
  13. Mardell, William V. Corporal. Residence, Cordele, GA; age, 24; born, Bainbridge, GA; occupation, Bk-Keeper; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 30, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 2, 1898
  14. George, Rugar E. Corporal. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 18; born, Rome, GA; occupation, Machinist; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 23, 1898
  15. Gwinns, Payton. Corporal. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 19; born, Winchester County, VA; occupation, Clerk; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; Mustered in Camp Northern Griffin, July 18, 1898
  16. Bell, DeWitt. Corporal. Residence, Farrill, AL; age, 24; born, Casandra, GA; occupation, Fireman; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  17. Brock, William H. Corporal. Residence, Trenton, GA; age, 18; born, Trenton, GA; occupation, Student; enlisted, Trenton, GA, July 7, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 20, 1898
  18. Byrd, Phil L. Corporal. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 18; born, Rome, GA; occupation, Clerk; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  19. Ellis, Flisha F. Corporal. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 19; born, Kingston; occupation, Wood Worker; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  20. Howell, William M. Corporal. Residence, Abbeville, GA; age, 25; born, Lumberton, NC; occupation, Merchant; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  21. King, Spencer B. Corporal. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 18; born, Rome, GA; occupation, Clerk; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  22. Allums, John J. Private. Residence, Douglasville, GA; age, 37; born, Henry Co., GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 30, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 3, 1898
  23. Arnold, John H. Private. Residence, Dallas, GA; age, 23; born, Dallas, GA; occupation, Farmer ; enlisted, Camp Northern GA, August 6, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 6, 1898
  24. Atkins, Tom. Private. Residence, Reasling, Floyd County, GA; age, 20; born, Floyd County, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Rome, GA, August 13, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 19, 1898
  25. Baumgartner, Schubert. Artificer. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 18; born, Knoxville, TN; occupation, Cabinet Maker; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 21, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 23, 1898
  26. Baxter, Homer E. Private. Residence, Vans Valley, GA; age, 18; born, Vans Valley, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  27. Baxter, John R. Private. Residence, Vans Valley, GA; age, 23; born, Vans Valley, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Rome, GA, August 3, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 5, 1898
  28. Baxter, William A. Residence, Six Mile Sta., GA; age, 28; born, Floyd County, GA; occupation, Six Mile Sta., GA; enlisted, Rome, GA, August 1, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 3, 1898
  29. Black, Fain B. Residence, Calhoun, GA; age, 26; born, Dalton, GA; occupation, Milling; enlisted, Trenton, GA, July 29, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 30, 1898
  30. Brannan, James F. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 25; born, Cumming, GA; occupation, Mill Operator; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  31. Bridges, James M. Private. Residence, Adel, GA; age, 21; born, Yorksville, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Adel, GA, July 21, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 27, 1898; buried Sparks City Cemetery, Sparks, GA
  32. Bunn, Chas. C., Jr. Private. Residence, Cedartown, GA; age, 18; born, Cedartown, GA; occupation, Clerk; enlisted, Rome, GA, August 3, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 8, 1898
  33. Chasewood, Richard A. Private. Residence, Atlanta, GA; age, 40; born, Newton County, GA; occupation, Shoe Maker; enlisted, Atlanta, GA, July 29, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 31, 1898
  34. Cliett, Hugh A. Private. Residence, Powersville, GA; age, 21; born, Bowersville, GA; occupation, Druggist; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  35. Collier, William. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 24; born, Peeks Hill, AL; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  36. Courson, Chas. A. Private. Residence, Hahira, GA; age, 21; born, Dupont, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Sparks, GA, July 23, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 27, 1898; died of typhoid fever at 1st Division Hospital, Savannah, GA, December 23, 1898; buried Friendship Cemetery, Hahira, GA
  37. Culbreath, Love. Private. Residence, Hahira, GA; age, 18; born, Troutman, NC; occupation, Mill Hand; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 28, 1898
  38. Culpepper, Morris P. Private. Residence, Mingo, GA; age, 23; born, Mingo, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; Mustered in Camp Northern, Griffin, July 15, 1898
  39. Davis, Chas. T. Private. Residence, Benn, GA; age, 21; born, Benn, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  40. Davis, Robert L. Wagoner. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 25; born, Spg Garden, AL; occupation, Clerk; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  41. Dorminy, Andrew J. Private. Residence, Dorminy Mills, GA; Record ID age, 20; born, Dorminy Mills, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 11, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  42. Dunford, John. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 27; born, Rockmart, GA; occupation, Clerk; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  43. Dunwoody, Chas. A. Private. Residence, Cedartown, GA; age, 35; born, Roswell, GA; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  44. Earle, Marcus B. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 28; born, Everett Springs; occupation, Railroader; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  45. Earp, Will G. Private. Residence, Sulphur Springs, GA; age, 18; born, Jasper, TN; occupation, Saw Milling;  enlisted, Trenton, GA, August 2, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 3, 1898
  46. Eustice, Hilliard. Musician. Residence, Rising Faun, GA; age, 18; born, Silver Plunk, CA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Trenton, GA, July 14, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 20, 1898
  47. Flowers, George C. Private. Residence, Sparks, GA; age, 34; born, Avery, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Sparks, GA, July 22, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 27, 1898
  48. Fountain, John T. Private. Residence, Tippettsville, GA; age, 21; born, Hawkinsville, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898.  Died, disease, December 8, 1898 at Savannah, GA
  49. Fowler, Columbus S. Private. Residence, Likeme, AL; age, 21; born, Melton, FL; occupation, Brickmason; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  50. Gillwater, Chas. E. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 39; born, Eufaula, AL; occupation, Brick Mason; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 23, 1898
  51. Graham, William F. Private. Residence, Fitzgerald, GA; age, 23; born, Independence, KS; occupation, Carpenter; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 25, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 30, 1898
  52. Griner, Walter A. Private. Residence, Nashville, GA; age, 19; born, Nashville, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  53. Haholzer, Mike. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 21; born, Pittsburg, PA; occupation, Tinner; enlisted, Rome, GA, 1898-08-01; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 3, 1898
  54. Hall, Burress. Musician,; Residence, Rising Fawn, GA; age, 21; born, Rising Fawn, GA; occupation, Musician; enlisted, July 18, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 20, 1898
  55. Hawk, Mitchell. Private. Residence, Rising Fawn, GA; age, 21; born, Rising Fawn, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Trenton, GA, July 14, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 20, 1898
  56. Herring, Eugene. Private. Residence, Lindale, GA; age, 23; born, Marshall County, MS; occupation, Mill Operator; enlisted, Rome, GA, 1898-08-02; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 4, 1898
  57. Hester, Zachary T., Jr. Private. Residence, Sparks, GA; age, 18; born, Glenville, MS; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 27, 1898
  58. Hoffman, Frederick. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 18; born, Jacksonville, AL; occupation, Shoe Maker; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 23, 1898
  59. Jackson, Central Z. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 21 8/12; born, Rome, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  60. Jobe, Henry W. B. Private. Residence, New England City, GA ; age, 21 3/12; born, Trenton, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Trenton, GA, July 7, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 20, 1898
  61. Johnson, Earl L. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 21 2/12; born, Elberton, GA; occupation, Clerk; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 16, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 23, 1898
  62. Jones, George H. Private. Residence, Goldsboro, N.C.; age, 28 7/12; born, Goldsboro, NC; occupation, Sawyer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  63. Jones, James A. Private. Residence, Tippettsville, GA; age, 27 2/12; born, Tippetsville, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  64. Jordan, James L. Private. Residence, Adel, GA; age, 25 7/12; born, Valdosta, GA; occupation, Mechanic; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  65. Keith, Ben. Private. Residence, Rising Fawn, GA; age, 21 3/12; born, Valley Head, AL; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Trenton, GA, July 15, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 3, 1898
  66. Keith, Thomas M. Private. Residence, Rising Fawn, GA; age, 25 11/12; born, Valley Head, AL; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Trenton, GA, July 14, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 20, 1898
  67. Kersey, Ike T. Residence, Cole City, GA; age, 29 5/12; born, Long Island, AL; occupation, Brakeman; enlisted, Trenton, GA; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA
  68. King, Robert N. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 21 11/12; born, Curryville, GA; occupation, Motorman; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  69. Langham, Nash. Private. Residence, Namnie, GA; age, 25 1/12; born, Dykes, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  70. Lawham, Virgil. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 23 8/12; born, Rome, GA; occupation, Oiler; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 16, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 23, 1898
  71. Martin, George A. Private. Residence, Hahira, GA; age, 21 5/12; born, Quitman; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Sparks, GA, July 23, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 27, 1898
  72. McGiboney, Chas. W. Private. Residence, Siney, GA; age, 21 9/12; born, Cave Springs, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Rome, GA, August 1, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 3, 1898
  73. Murray, Elmore E. Private. Residence, Savannah, GA; age, 21 1/12; born, Barton, Vt.; occupation, Teacher; enlisted, Sparks, GA, July 21, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 27, 1898
  74. O’Quinn, Carl R. Private. Residence, Nashville, GA; age, 18; born, Dupont, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  75. Porter, Aleck. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 18; born, Cave Springs, GA; occupation, Clerk; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  76. Porter, F. Private. Residence, Cole City, GA; age, 21; born, Long Island, GA; occupation, Guard; enlisted, Trenton, GA, July 18, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 20, 1898
  77. Posey, Thomas. Private. Residence, Margie, GA; age, 18; born, “Don’t Know” AK; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Rome, GA, August 2, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 5, 1898
  78. Rawlins, Marvin M. Private. Residence, Stockbridge, GA; age, 21; born, Snearsville, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Sparks, GA, July 21, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 27, 1898
  79. Reid, Ed. Private. Residence, Rome; age, 20; born, Rome, GA; occupation, Laborer; enlisted, Rome, GA, 1898-08-01; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 3, 1898
  80. Richardson, Wm. H. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 21; born, Coaco, GA ; occupation, Farmer;  enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  81. Rouse, Allen G. Private. Residence, Hahira, GA; age, 22; born, Fayetteville, N.C.; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Sparks, GA, July 23, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 27, 1898
  82. Rustin, David L. Private. Residence, Reidsville, GA; age, 31 1/2; born, Reidsville, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  83. Sanford, Rowan G. Private. Residence, Graham, GA; age, 23 2/12; born, Graham; occupation, Mechanic; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  84. Shannon, Oscar. Private. Residence, Etwah, GA; age, 20 7/12; born, Cleveland, TN; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Cleveland, TN, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 30, 1898
  85. Shelly, Lewis. Private. Residence, Cedar Bluff, AL; age, 19 3/12; born, Cedar Bluff, AL; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Rome, GA, August 4, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 6, 1898
  86. Sisk, Elijah W. Private. Residence, Everett, GA; age, 19 3/12; born, Plainsville, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Rome, GA, 1898-08-02; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 5, 1898
  87. Slaton, Purcelle. Private. Residence, Rising Fawn, GA; age,21 3/12; born, Rising Fawn, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Trenton, GA, July 15, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 20, 1898
  88. Smith, F H. Private. Residence, Atlanta, GA; age, 23 3/12; born, Gadsden, AL; occupation, Candy Maker; enlisted, Atlanta, GA, July 28, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 30, 1898
  89. Snider, George W. Private. Residence, Morristown, TN; age, 27 4/12; born, Maryville, TN; occupation, Med. Student; enlisted, Trenton, GA, July 7, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 20, 1898
  90. Snow, Henry O. Jr. Private. Residence, Abbeville, GA; age, 22 2/12; born, Brookville, Fla.; occupation, Med. Student; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 16, 1898
  91. Stappins, Wofford. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 22 10/12; born, Cartersville, GA ; occupation, Mill Operator; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; Mustered in AtCamp Northern Griffin, July 18, 1898
  92. Stephens, W. Dutchman. Private. Residence, Sparks, GA; age, 20 5/12; born, Wadley, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 27, 1898
  93. Swift, Mathews T. Private. Residence, Fitzgerald, GA; age, 21 11/12; born, Wrens, GA; occupation, Engineer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 25, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 30, 1898
  94. Tidwell, Williams. Private. Residence, Rising Fawn, GA; age, 18 1/12; born, Rising Fawn, GA; occupation, Painter; enlisted, Rising Fawn, GA, July 7, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 20, 1898
  95. Walden, William H. Private. Residence, Cason, GA; age, 22 3/12; born, Cason, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  96. Walker, John S. Private. Residence, Rising Fawn, GA; age, 26 6/12; born, Cedar Grove, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Trenton, GA, August 2, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 3, 1898
  97. Webb, Wiley. Private. Residence, Long Island, AL; age, 34 8/12; born, Cole City; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Trenton, GA, July 18, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 20, 1898
  98. Wheeler, Floyd T. Private. Residence, Trenton, GA; age, 21 4/12; born, Trenton, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Griffin, GA, July 10, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 20, 1898
  99. Wilder, Robert T. Private. Residence, Lindale, GA; age, 22 7/12; born, Cherokee Co., AL; occupation, Mill Hand; enlisted, Rome, GA, August 2, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, August 3, 1898
  100. Wilkinson, Ernest C. Private. Residence,Atlanta, GA; age, 19 11/12; born, Wilmington, N.C.; occupation, Electrician; enlisted, Atlanta, GA, July 13, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898
  101. Williams, Arthur E. Private. Residence, Jacksonville, GA; age, 19 3/12; born, McRae, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 11, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 15, 1898
  102. Yapp, Pythias D. Private. Residence, Nashville, GA; age, 19 5/12; born, Dublin, GA; occupation, Mill Hand; enlisted, Abbeville, GA, July 9, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 28, 1898
  103. Young, Joseph. Private. Residence, Rome, GA; age, 23 6/12; born, Canton, GA; occupation, Farmer; enlisted, Rome, GA, July 8, 1898; mustered in, Camp Northern, Griffin, GA, July 18, 1898

Nashville High School, Class of 1949

Class of 1949
Nashville High School, Nashville, Berrien County, GA

Doris Burnsed, Nashville High School Class of 1949, Berrien County, GA

Doris Burnsed, Nashville High School Class of 1949, Berrien County, GA

Carroll Dorsey, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Carroll Dorsey (1932-2011), Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Billie Ruth Nix, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Billie Ruth Nix, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Willis Hand, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Willis Hand, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Sarah Byron, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Sarah Byron, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Randel Napier, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Randel Napier, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Rachel Parrish, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Rachel Parrish, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Nanette Register, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Nanette Register, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mary Jo Forehand, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mary Jo Forehand, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mary Jim Fuller, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mary Jim Fuller, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mary Dees, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mary Dees, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Marie Baker, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Marie Baker, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mallie Hancock, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mallie Hancock, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mack Harper, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Mack Harper, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Lula Hendry, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Lula Hendry, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Lamar Griffin, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Lamar Griffin, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Kenneth Jones, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Kenneth Jones, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Kathleen Mathis, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Kathleen Mathis, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Geneva Browning, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Geneva Browning, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Bertice Summerlin, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Bertice Summerlin, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Faye Watson, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Faye Watson, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Diane Miley, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Diane Miley, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Billy Vickers, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Billy Vickers, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Alvin Drawdy, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Alvin Drawdy, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Margaret Davis, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Margaret Davis, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Iris Harvey, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Iris Harvey, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Franklin Parrish, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Franklin Parrish, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Jehu Walker, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Jehu Walker, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Christine Collins, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Christine Collins, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Juanita Ewing, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Juanita Ewing, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Patsy Webb, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Patsy Webb, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Annette Partin, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Annette Partin, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Julia Davis, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Julia Davis, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Joe Sizemore, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Joe Sizemore, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Betty Sue Henley, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Betty Sue Henley, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Maxie Cornelius, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Maxie Cornelius, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Homer Lee Forehand, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Homer Lee Forehand, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Bobby, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Bobby, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Betty Rowan, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Betty Rowan, Class of 1949, Nashville High School, Berrien County, GA

Related Posts:

Judge Richard Augustus Peeples

Richard Augustus Peeples (1829-1891)

continued from Richard Augustus Peeples, Clerk of the Berrien Courts.

Richard Augustus Peeples (1829-1891)

Richard Augustus Peeples (1829-1891)

Richard Augustus Peeples was the seventh son of Henry Peeples. He was born in Hall county, Georgia, September 24th, 1829. He moved with his father, first to Jackson County then to Lowndes County (now Berrien), GA, settling on Flat Creek about 1847 or ’48. His father established a store, the locality hence taking the name of “Peeple’s Store.” and acquired some 1530 acres of land. Henry Peeples was enumerated as the owner of three slaves in the Census of 1850.  In 1850, Richard A. Peeples married Sarah J. K. Camp, born July 30, 1830, the younger sister of his brother’s wife.  They were married November 7, 1850 in Jackson County. After marriage Richard A.  and Sara Jane Peeples located at Milltown in Berrien County, GA where he was engaged in saw-milling for time.  Upon the organization of Berrien county in 1856 Richard A. Peeples was elected to serve as the first Clerk of the courts and  moved his residence to Nashville.  He was instrumental in the construction of the first school house and the first Baptist church

While serving as Clerk of the Berrien courts, R. A. Peeples undertook the study of law. In 1860,  he moved to the new town of Valdosta, purchasing ten acres of land outside the downtown area from James W. Patterson for $300. The census records of 1860 record that Valdosta had a population of approximately 120 whites and 46 blacks at that time.  Richard Peeples was the owner of four slaves. His real estate was valued at $2000.00 and personal estate was worth $5,500.00 On being admitted to the bar, he opened an office as one of the first lawyers resident in Valdosta. His law office, and that of William Dasher, were directly across the street from the Lowndes County courthouse. The early years of Valdosta coincided with the War years and, as most of the men were away in Confederate service, the dozen or so commercial and public buildings which had been constructed by 1863 were of rather unsophisticated wood frame construction. J. T. Shelton described the courthouse as “a rough frame building,  with a door leading into the court room and another into the small office of the clerk. The interior of the building had plenty of light from its several windows, but not a single coat of paint.

The children of Richard A Peeples and Sarah Jane Camp were:

  1. Sally Peeples (1850-1938)
  2. Henry C. Peeples (1852-1905)
  3. Charles B. Peeples (1854-1912)
  4. Mary Emma Peeples (1856-1928)

But Sarah J. K. Camp Peeples would not live to see her children grown. She died at the age of thirty-three on July 3, 1863.

Obituary of Sarah Jane Peeples, from the Milledgeville Southern Recorder, July 21, 1863

Obituary of Sarah Jane Peeples, from the Milledgeville Southern Recorder, July 21, 1863

Milledgeville Southern Recorder
July 21, 1863

DIED

         Departed this life, at Valdosta, Lowndes county, on the 2d inst., after a short but painful attack, of a few days, Mrs. SARAH JANE PEEPLES, wife of Richard A. Peeples, Esq., in the thirty-third year of her age.
         Beautiful, calm and trusting, passed the years of her earthly pilgrimage; and as quietly and beautifully has passed away, forever, one of the gentle and loved of the earth.
        She embraced religion in her fourteenth year and connected herself with the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which she continued an ardent and devoted member up to the period of her departure from this world of trouble; and her death-bed scene was one of those a——— —-nces of the truth of Christian religion, which blesses the dying and reflects back upon the living the subdued, but steady light, which makes glad the heart of the Christian traveler. Husband, children, friends, servants, all were bid adieu, and forever with hopeful trust, and she quietly fell asleep in her Saviour’s arms and gladly exchanged this body of death for robes of light and immortality.
        Farewell kindly gentle, and loving daughter, wife, sister, mother, friend. May the strong light of thy truthful, Christian life and womanly virtues long dwell around the vacant hearts and habitation of mourning husband and weeping children. And may the God of all goodness and grace suit this deep and sad bereavement to the increased religious conviction of the stricken ones left behind.

A BROTHER.

Did Sarah J. Peeples die in childbirth? The obituary makes no mention of a pregnancy. But an inscription on her grave marker indicates that she was buried with “little Carrie”  – for whom no date of birth or death is given.

Grave of Sarah Jane Camp Peeples and her daughter Caroline "Carrie" Peeples, Sunset Hill Cemetery, Valdosta, GA. Image source: PhillW

Grave of Sarah Jane Camp Peeples and her daughter Caroline “Carrie” Peeples, Sunset Hill Cemetery, Valdosta, GA. Image source: PhillW

In the fall  and winter of 1863, when the Berrien Minute Men were with Confederate forces facing the Union Army’s encroachment in Georgia, Valdosta became one of the refugee towns of the South.  “As the Union Army advanced in north Georgia and drove toward Atlanta, residents of those areas left their homes,” J. T. Shelton wrote in Pines and Pioneers,

 Refugees clogged the railroads to the southward, for those areas were remote from the fighting. Riding in coaches if they could find seats, loading furniture, provisions and families in freight cars if they were fortunate in securing empties, a wave of new residents came into Lowndes county [via the new Atlantic & Gulf Railroad.]…Acting as a real estate agent, lawyer Richard A. Peeples helped many to locate on newly acquired properties. Some newcomers brought their slaves, and they had to find farms large enough to produce food for their laborers. When rations of corn and peas proved insufficient, the slaves ranged through the woods looking for hogs, cattle, even gophers to supplement their diet. Consequently the local people distrusted the imported black men with the strange “primitive” speech, for the south Georgians were not familiar with the coastal dialect. Ultimately, the rice laborers found no place in Lowndes and drifted back to their former homes.

Among those who “refugeed” to Valdosta was Miss Sarah Virginia Dent, of Savannah, whose deceased father was Captain James Preston Dent, and whose brother was serving in the Confederate States Navy aboard the Confederate raider CSS Alabama.

According to A History of Savannah and South Georgia, “During the war between the states he [Richard A. Peeples] commanded company of Georgia Reserves, being stationed at Savannah until the capture of that city, and then in Columbia, South Carolina. The Mayor of Savannah surrendered the city to Sherman’s army on December 21, 1864; Columbia, SC surrendered February 17, 1865. After the fall of the latter city Richard Peeples was sent home sick, and was unable to rejoin his command before the close of the war.” However,  the 1864 census for the re-organization of the Georgia Militia shows Richard A. Peeples claimed an exemption from military service because  he was a county tax collector. He was serving as the Enrolling Officer for the militia company in the 663rd Militia District in Lowndes County, at least as late as June 10, 1864. He supplied his own horse and shotgun.

A letter dated May 20, 1864 addressed to Lieutenant R. A. Peeples indicates he was then serving  in the Georgia Militia at  Savannah, GA and seeking a commission in the Confederate States Army.

Head Qrs Geo Militia
Atlanta May 20, 1864

Lt R A Peeples
Savannah Ga

Lieut,
In reply to your favor 21st inst the Maj Gen Comndg instructs me to reply that you are granted leave of absence from these Head Quarters until the point of elligibility is decided, & if against your right to hold a Commission in CSA, you will at once report to these Head Qrs. By order Maj Gen Wayne Commng
W K deGraffenreid A Ag

Richard Augustus Peeples, Civil War Letter

Richard Augustus Peeples, Civil War Letter

Confederate service records show R. A. Peeples was made Captain, Company G, Symon’s 1st Georgia Reserves. He was with the unit for July and August, 1864, as indicated on Company Muster Rolls , and was elected Captain on July 30, 1864. This unit was surrendered with the 6th Regiment Georgia Reserves and were considered prisoners of war after May 10, 1865.  He was paroled at Thomasville, GA on May 18, 1865.

 

About a year after the death of his first wife he [Richard A. Peeples] married Miss Sarah Virginia Dent, of Savannah, who had refugeed to Valdosta, and whose father [Captain James Preston Dent] was largely interested in the shipping interests of that city.[Her father died of cholera on  July 3, 1850.] A brother of hers, Capt. James Dent, was in the Confederate service on board the cruiser “Alabama,” and when she was sunk by the [USS] “Kearsage” he jumped overboard and escaped capture by swimming to the British vessel, “Greyhound.” [Deerhound] He died afterward from the exposure and its results.

By this second marriage there were born to him [Richard A. Peeples] two daughters and three sons, all of whom [lived] in Valdosta. -Memoirs of Georgia

The five children of the second marriage were:

  1. Walter Dent Peeples (1864-1926)
  2. Etta Lee Peeples (1865-1921)
  3. Richard Alexander Peeples (1867-1927)
  4. Fannie Peeples (1870-1938)
  5. William Cincinnatus Peeples (1872-1947)

After the war, Richard Peeples made his life in Valdosta.

[He] followed the profession of law in Valdosta  with more than usual success, accumulating sufficient to place his large and growing family in easy circumstances. For twelve years he filled the office of city judge, and was one of the influential Democrats and public-spirited citizens of this part of the state. Besides contributing largely, he canvassed the field and raised $2,500.00 to aid in building for the Baptists of Valdosta a house of worship, which was one of the finest in southern Georgia. [He also acted as agent for the church.] Later, he erected, almost unaided, very neat church building at Clyattville, in Lowndes county. – History of the Baptist Denomination in Georgia

This church was,  “The Benevolence Baptist Church …organized about 1865 or 1866, by Judge Peeples, and the first building was located on the Henry Brown place. The church building was moved in 1884 to land given by Mr. Charlie Arnold, four miles north on the old Valdosta-Clyattville road. There were twelve charter members. The first pastor was Judge R. A. Peeples. Others were: Messrs. Dave Evans, Mart Knight, High, Pitt Head, Henry Bryant, W. J. Ballen, Davis, Thrasher, Gus Sellars, S.S. Mathis, E. L. Todd, Roy Powell, Harvey Wages, A.C. Pyle, W.C. Taylor, W. J. Harrell, and Pulian Mattox. -History of Lowndes County, Georgia

These four buildings [McPherson Academy, Nashville Baptist Church, Valdosta Baptist Church, Benevolence Baptist Church]  are monuments of his Christian zeal and philanthropy. 

In 1867,  R.A. Peeples was among a group of white Lowndes citizens wrestling with the new realities of Emancipation.  The slave economy of the South was wrecked. J. T. Shelton in Pines and Pioneers observed “In the unsettled conditions of 1865, 1866, and 1867, a grower found it difficult to make cotton; certainly the workers had a hard time finding enough to eat.”  Resisting the conditions imposed upon them by Reconstruction the white planters sought alternatives to employing Freedmen. On September 12, 1867 Peeples along with Col W. H. Manning, Henry Burroughs Holliday, Captain John R. Stapler,  William Roberts, John Washington Harrell, A. McLeod, Hugh McCauley Coachman, John Charles Wisenbaker, W. Zeigler, Major Philip C. Pendleton, Col. S. W. Baker, James A. Dasher, Sr., David Peter Gibson, James T. Bevill, D. J. Jones, Archibald Averett, Charles Henry Millhouse Howell, J. H. Tillman  convened to form the Valdosta Immigration Society. The purpose of this organization was to procure emigrant labor of “the kind wanted”, by sending an agent direct to Europe to obtain them. It was also the  emphatic opinion of the meeting that no planter ought to employ a freedman who has been discharged by his employer for misconduct, but that the freedman should have a recommendation from his former employer.  Major Pendleton was selected as the agent to make the trip.

In 1867, R. A. Peeples was elected as a director of the Georgia Masonic Life Insurance company.

He was a member of the Democratic Party of Lowndes County. In March, 1868 he was a vice president of the Democratic Convention of the First Congressional District of Georgia, which convened to elect delegates to the national convention in New York.

Following the bombing of a political rally of Freedmen held by congressional candidate J. W. Clift at  the Lowndes County courthouse on the evening of Saturday, April 4, 1868, R.A. Peeples chaired a civic meeting condemning the actions of both the bombers and the candidate. This event followed just four days on the Camilla Massacre, where 12 freedmen were murdered in what is generally regarded as the first strike of the Ku Klux Klan in Georgia.

In July, 1868 Richard A. Peeples was a Lowndes County delegate to the Democratic state convention to nominate party candidates for the President of the United States. In late August, 1868, Peeples, Remerton Y. Lane and Iverson Griffin, one of the men who had been implicated in the Clift Bombing at Valdosta in April, were among the organizers of a political rally at Valdosta to be held August 27. The announcement in the Valdosta South Georgia Times read, “there will be a free barbecue at Valdosta. Speakers from a distance may be expected. Let every man, white and colored, turn out.”

At the Democratic Convention of the First Congressional District, held September 16, 1868 at Blackshear, GA, Richard A. Peeples and P.C. Pendleton were delegates from Lowndes County, along with W.H. Dasher, James Dasher, James M. Clap and G.G. Hammond. Benjamin Jones, J. E. Williams and H. T. Peeples were the delegates from Berrien County. Delegates from Appling, Bryan, Chatham, Camden, Charlton, Clinch, Coffee, Liberty, Montgomery, Pierce, Telfair, Laurens, Ware, Wayne, Brooks, Colquitt, Echols, Thomas, and Screven, as well as “colored delegates appointed by Democratic Clubs” were also seated for the convention [The Young Men’s Democratic Clubs were the public political wing of the KKK]. Richard A. Peeples offer a resolution, unanimously adopted, that the purpose of the convention was the nomination of a candidate for Congress in the election to be held March 4, 1869. On the third ballot the convention nominated Augustin H. Hansell as the candidate. The following day, the state House of Representatives in Georgia passed a bill permitting “none but intelligent persons to sit on juries, and exclud[ing] negroes from the jury box.”

Three or four times he [Richard A. Peeples] was elected alderman of Valdosta, and, once, was elected to the mayoralty.  At the organization of the County Court of Lowndes county in 1874, he was appointed Judge, and …held the position ever since, having been reappointed once; and his decisions were seldom reversed by higher courts.

He was ordained in 1876, at Statenville, in Echols county, the presbytery consisting of Elders N. A. Bailey, James McBride, E. B. Carroll and R, W. Phillips. He became pastor of the Statenville church, and, afterwards, of the neighboring churches of Macedonia and Bethlehem. He was for three years Chairman of the Sunday-school Committee of the Mercer Association, and through his instrumentality, mainly, the cause of Sunday-schools was greatly promoted in the eastern part of the Association. Indeed, all his time, which could be spared from his judicial duties, was given to this work, into which he entered most enthusiastically, organizing, by his own efforts, not less than eighteen Sunday-schools. Attended by the earnest-minded partner of his life, he would journey from neighborhood to neighborhood in Jersey spring-wagon, carrying along an elegant parlor organ, advocating the Sunday-school cause, and furnishing such sweet music and singing such beautiful songs, that all hearts were enchanted. Such zeal and capacity could not but succeed.

Mr. Peeples is man of liberal views, and … broad and comprehensive mind. His reasoning powers are of high order, superinduced by an inquiring disposition, and by habit of analyzing, in detail, every thought and subject presented to him. The creatures of his own brain, as far as such can be the case considering that men are but divine instruments, his sermons are characterized by clearness and independence of thought, rather than by impassioned eloquence. In religion, as well as in the affairs of the world, he thinks and acts for himself, with comparative indifference to the opinions of others, being guided by his own judgment. In his speech and manner he is frank and candid, while deceit is utterly foreign to his nature. Five feet and nine inches high, and weighing one hundred and ninety-six pounds, he is man of robust constitution, and bids fair for much longer life of usefulness.  – History of the Baptist Denomination in Georgia

In addition to his legal, civic, and religious work, R. A. Peeples was an accomplished farmer and business man.

Atlanta Constitution
December 19, 1882

Valdosta, December 18.
…Judge R. A. Peeples is one of our largest truck farmers. He is now making quite extensive preparations, and will plant next year 130 acres in melons, 10 acres in cucumbers, and about 12 acres in Irish potatoes, besides two acres in cabbages. The Judge has experience in this industry, and your correspondent will have some interesting facts to submit in a few months in regard to the result of his large operations.

His brother, Henry T. Peeples, farmed in Berrien County, GA where he was the largest producer of rice. His nephew, Henry B. Peeples, was one of the early teachers in Berrien County.

About 1885, Judge R. A. Peeples built a brick commercial building at 200 N. Patterson St. to house R.A. Peeples & Sons, which he had established in 1872 as  Valdosta’s first insurance company.  Today, The main entrance of the Peeples Building faces Patterson Street , but originally the main entrance was on Central Avenue. This building in the 1890s was the home of Dr. W. F. Munroe’s drug store; He had a popular soda fountain and was the first to serve fruit ices. This building now houses Kings Grill.

Judge Richard A. Peeples died on Sunday, July 19, 1891. The Valdosta Times reported his death.

 

Valdosta Times
Saturday, July 25, 1891

Judge Peeples Dead. He Passed Suddenly Away On Sunday Morning Last. Brief Sketch Of A Remarkable Career. Judge R.A. Peeples is dead!

He was called away suddenly at two o’clock Sunday morning last. Heart disease seems to have been the cause. On Sunday morning the 11th inst., he was suddenly attacked with a very severe pain in the region of the chest. He suffered intensely, and Dr. Lang was sent for, but before he came the trouble passed off, and the judge was riding about town apparently in usual health a few hours after. On the Thursday following, he had another but lighter attack which soon disappeared. On Saturday, in response to a petition from a colored Baptist Church in the lower part of the county, he got into his buggy and drove down to the Stegall Plantation to settle a disturbance in the Church. Mrs. Peeples was uneasy about him, and after failing to dissuade him from going, sent Jim Johnson, a colored employee, after him in a road cart. The Judge went to the colored Church, but began to feel so badly he was unable to assist the colored people, and started on the return home. He told Jim several times to drive faster, that he was feeling very badly. He got home about dark, and when the anxious wife met him at the gate he said he was quite sick. He refused all importunities to send for the doctor, or some of his grown children living in town, saying that he was not near so sick as he had been. He retired but did not seem to sleep well – his wife keeping a lonely vigil, while their two younger children slept unsuspecting, in other rooms.

About two o’clock Mrs. Peeples noticed that he was breathing badly, and at the same instant, she heard him slap his hands together, probably to attract attention, and when she got to his bedside he was speechless. His son Cincinnatus was immediately dispatched for a doctor, but the Judge breathed his last, without a struggle, before the young man reached the front gate. When he died, no one was in the house but Mrs. Peeples and their daughter, Miss Fannie. Kind neighbors and friends soon gathered in and performed such services as they could for the afflicted family.

During Sunday scores of friends and acquaintances called to see for the last time a face and form which had been a prominent figure in this community for thirty odd years. Among them were a large number of our colored people, with whom he was always popular. The funeral services were conducted at the house at 9 o’clock on Monday morning. Rev. P.H. Murray, the Pastor of the Baptist Church, was absent from the city, and couldn’t be reached by a telegram on Sunday; and the Judge’s warm friend, Rev. B.F. Breedlove, Pastor of the Methodist Church, officiated in his stead, assisted by Rev. Mr. Reaves. The earnest and eloquent words of the preacher were brief but impressive. The house and yard and street in front of the house of mourning were filled with sympathizing friends. The active pall bearers were Messrs. C.C. Varnedoe, S.B. Godwin, L.F. Zeigler, J.R. Slater, A.A. Parrish and CR. Pendleton. The honorary pall bearers, Messrs. R.Y. Lane, W.H. Briggs, A. Converse, Thos. Crawford, J.O. Varnedoe and Louis Strickland. The funeral procession was perhaps the largest that ever moved through our streets to the cemetery. According to his frequently expressed desire his remains were laid away with the simplest ceremony, and without display.

Although some of his nine children lived many miles away all were present when this last service for his mortal remains were performed. Judge Peeples would have been 62 years old on the 14th of next September. He was one of the very first settlers in Valdosta, and has always been intimately associated with the growth and prosperity of the town. Once its Mayor, several times an Alderman, and always a public-spirited, hard working citizen, he has done perhaps more than any one man to make Valdosta the town she is to-day. For sixteen years he was Judge of our County Court, and during that long period he made a model Judge. His decisions were appealed to a higher court but seven times, and he was reversed but three. This record of able and eminent service stands without a parallel, perhaps.

Grave of Richard A Peeples, Sunset Cemetery, Valdosta, GA. Image source: Cat.

Grave of Richard A Peeples, Sunset Cemetery, Valdosta, GA. Image source: Cat.

elated Posts:

Richard Augustus Peeples, Clerk of the Berrien Courts

Rice Production in Wiregrass Georgia

Henry Harrison Knight Wrote City Charter for Nashville, GA

Henry Harrison Knight with wife Mary Susan Ray and their son Levi Jackson Knight circa 1896. The Knight home was at Ray City, GA. Image detail courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

Henry Harrison Knight with wife Mary Susan Ray and their son Levi Jackson Knight circa 1896. The Knight home was at Ray City, GA. Image detail courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

Henry Harrison Knight, author of the original city charter of Nashville, GA, was a resident of Ray City. He served in the state Legislature as Representative of Berrien County and as a member of the Board of  County Commissioners  through several terms. In 1885,  The Official Register of the United States listed  H.H. Knight   as Post Master of “Ray’s Mills”, Berrien County, Georgia.

As a part of the Bicentennial Celebration in Nashville on the 4th of July, 1976, his grandson, Jack Knight, presented Nashville Mayor Bobby Carroll with a copy of the charter.

Nashville, GA city charter, 1892

Copy of original city charter presented by Jack Knight to the mayor of Nashville, GA July 4, 1976

Nashville Herald
July 8, 1976

Copy Original City Charter Presented by W. D. Knight

        A highlight of the bicentennial festivities in Nashville Sunday, July 4, was a presentation of a copy of the original city charter from W. D. ‘Jack’ Knight.
        The charter was drawn up by H. H. ‘Henry’ Knight of Ray City, father of E. M. ‘Hun’ Knight, and grandfather of Jack.  He served as representative from Berrien County in 1892-93.
        Passed in 1892 and signed by the governor on Dec. 20 of that same year, the charter stated the city limits extended one-half mile in all directions from the courthouse. Also. W. L. Swindle was elected the first mayor, along with five councilmen.
        Mr. Knight, who was born in 1840, owned one of the first stores in Ray City, and served as commissioner of Berrien County for three years. He also served in the Confederate Army where he was wounded on two different occasions. 
        Mr. Knight was married to the daughter of T. M. Ray for whom Ray City was named. He died in 1899 and is buried with his wife in Beaver Dam Cemetery in Ray City.

WD Knight presents Nashville, GA City Charter to Mayor Bobby Carroll during Bicentennial Celebration, July 4, 1976. Image courtesy of www,berriencountyga.com

WD Knight presents Nashville, GA City Charter to Mayor Bobby Carroll during Bicentennial Celebration, July 4, 1976. Image courtesy of www,berriencountyga.com

Ray City Catholics served by St. Theresa’s Parish

The August 25, 1945 edition of the Augusta Bulletin newspaper relates that Ray City was a mission station of St. Theresa’s Church at Albany, GA.

The construction of St. Theresa’s Church began before the Civil War.  The bricks were handmade by slaves on the Barbour Plantation near Newnan, GA. During the war the building was used as a Confederate hospital.

St. Theresa's Church, Albany, GA.

St. Theresa’s Church, Albany, GA.

“In 1859 work was begun on the erection of the little brick church within whose hallowed, ivy-clad walls, the Catholics in Albany still gather to worship before the Alter of God. In 1861, war between the North and the South came to cause a delay in the completion of the edifice, but when the Conquered Banner of the Confederacy had been furled, the grey-clad warriors had trod the weary miles back home and with their unconquered courage they began to rebuild their lives, the task of completing the interior of the church was taken up again.”

The first resident pastor of St. Theresa’s Church was Father Stephen J. Beytaugh, appointed in 1875 by Reverend William H. Gross, Bishop of Savannah.

“Father Beytaugh had been in Albany just about a year when he died from yellow fever, contracted while administering the Last Sacraments to a member of his mission parish in Americus. Father John Murphy, who succeeded Father Beytaugh, died in less than a year after going to St. Theresa’s as pastor. In 1879, Father P. H. McMahon, of blessed memory, went to Albany as pastor, but the rigorous hardships on the many missions attached to the parish impaired his health, and he was succeeded by Father Charles Clement Prendergast, who was pastor in 1882 when St. Theresa’s Church was formally dedicated by Bishop Gross.”

In the following years, “the far-flung mission territory of Albany embraced an area of 15,000 square miles in extent, covering about one-third of the whole State of Georgia, and including forty-one counties. There were churches at Albany, Alapaha, Americus, Bainbridge, Fitzgerald, Moultrie, Thomasville, and Willacoochee, and in other places Mass was offered in private homes. In visiting their mission stations, the priests traveled by rail, on trains, good, bad and indifferent, by mule-drawn vehicles, and by T-Model Ford, which last method of transportation made possible the celebration of two masses at two different places on a Sunday. Mission stations were Adel, Andersonville, Arlington, Cordele, Cuthbert, Cecil, Dosia, Dupont, Dawson, Douglas, Golden, Hahira, Iron City, Milltown, Naylor, Nashville, Ocilla, Quitman, Rhine, Ray City, Sylvester, Sycamore, Stockton, Tifton, Valdosta, and West Green.”

Nashville home of Terrell Swindle.

Terrell Swindle (1919-1994)

Terrell Swindle was born and raised at Ray City, GA. He later moved to Nashville, GA. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

Terrell Swindle was born and raised at Ray City, GA. He later moved to Nashville, GA. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

Nashville, GA home of Terrell Swindle.

Nashville, GA home of Terrell Swindle.

Glenn Terrell Swindle was born at Ray City, GA June 13, 1919, a son of Rozzie P. Swindle and Ollie May Moore. The Swindles were farmers and sold local produce. Their farm goods included clabber, a yogurt-like milk product, and the lane to their farm became known as Clabberville Road.

As a man, Terrell Swindle moved to Nashville, GA where he engaged in farming and raising hogs.

Terrell was a great fan of folk music and a friend of Ray City musician John Guthrie, often hanging out at the Guthrie home in Ray City or attending musical events.

Terrell was also a good friend to David Miley, nephew of John Guthrie . Terrell was a pilot and owned his own plane. He periodically flew from Nashville to Dog Island, FL to pick up piglets for his stock.  Sometimes David Miley would fly with him.

https://raycityhistory.wordpress.com/?attachment_id=24907

Terrell Swindle and hogs. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

Terrell Swindle died on February 20, 1994. He is buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

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WWI Berrien County Draft Board

1917 Berrien County Draft Board

Men who are eligible to draft shall not “hide behind petticoats or children.”

On May 17, 1917, the Governor of Georgia announced the appointment of county boards of registration for the selective draft for WWI. The local boards, composed of leading civilians in each community, were entrusted with the administration of the selective draft. These Registration Boards, also known as Exemption Boards, issued draft calls in order of numbers drawn in a national lottery and determined exemptions for dependency, essential occupations, or conscientious objection. Board Members appointed for Berrien County, GA were:

  • Joe Varn Nix, Sheriff of Berrien County, GA
  • James Henry Gaskins, Clerk of the Superior Court of Berrien County, GA
  • Joel Ira Norwood , Ordinary of Berrien County, GA
  • Dr Lafayette Alonzo Carter, Physician

 

Joseph Varn Nix (1882-1963) <br /> Sheriff Joe Varn Nix, appointed by Governor Harris as Executive Officer of the Berrien County Registration Board for the 1917 WWI selective draft. Image detail courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

Joseph Varn Nix (1882-1963)
Sheriff Joe Varn Nix, appointed by Governor Harris as Executive Officer of the Berrien County Registration Board for the 1917 WWI selective draft. Image detail courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

 

Jim Gaskins <br> With the onset of World War I in 1917,  James Henry "Jim" Gaskins was appointed as clerk of the Berrien County Exemption Board.  Gaskins was dismissed from the Exemption Board in December, 1917 after he became embroiled in a scandal over reward money for capture of a draft dodger. Gaskins was a former resident of Ray City, GA

Jim Gaskins (1872-1928)
With the onset of World War I in 1917,  James Henry “Jim” Gaskins was appointed as clerk of the Berrien County Registration Board.  Gaskins was dismissed from the Registration Board in December, 1917 after he became embroiled in a scandal over reward money for capture of a draft dodger. Gaskins was a former resident of Ray City, GA

 

Dr Lafayette Alonzo Carter (1858-1932), of Nashville, GA was appointed as Physician for the Berrien County Draft Registration Board, 1917

Dr Lafayette Alonzo Carter (1858-1932)
Dr. L. A. Carter, of Nashville, GA was appointed as Physician for the Berrien County Draft Registration Board, 1917

 

The fourth member of the board, Joel Ira Norward (1869-1956) (not pictured), was a native of Berrien County, GA born on July 9, 1869, in that section of Berrien later cut into Lanier, Georgia. Joel came from a large family, with eight brothers and sisters; at the time of his birth his father, Theodore Gourdine Norwood, was 65 and his mother, Elizabeth Green Norwood, was 32. Joel Ira Norwood married Laura Virginia Shaw on October 23, 1890 and they made their home in Nashville, GA. Joel farmed for a time and was elected county treasurer of Berrien County in 1896 and re-elected in 1900 and 1904, but declined to run for the position in the election of 1908.  In the early 1900s, J.I. Norwood was a business partner of fellow Draft Board member, Dr. L. A. Carter, the two being joint owners of a 250 acre land lot situated on Grand Bay, east of Ray’s Mill (now Ray City). By 1910, J. I. Norwood had his primary occupation from farming to selling insurance for a living. In 1910, he campaigned unsuccessfully for election as county sheriff of Berrien County. In 1912 he was elected Ordinary of Berrien County and was re-elected in 1916.  J. I. Norwood and Laura Virginia Shaw had seven children. He died on November 2, 1956, in Lowndes, Georgia, at the age of 87, and was buried in Adel, Georgia.

The Governor’s appointments and charges to the Registration Boards was published in the Atlanta Constitution, May 20, 1917 edition.

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On May 17, 1917, the Governor of Georgia announced the appointment of county boards of registration for the selective draft for WWI. Registrars for Berrien County were J.V. Nix, J.H. Gaskins, J.I. Norwood, and L.A. Carter.

On May 17, 1917, the Governor of Georgia announced the appointment of county boards of registration for the selective draft for WWI. Registrars for Berrien County were J.V. Nix, J.H. Gaskins, J.I. Norwood, and L.A. Carter.

 

Atlanta Constitution
May 20, 1917

Governor Harris Appoints Boards of Registration

Officials in Charge Must Perfect Organizations and Swear in Registrars Within Five Days.

SHERIFFS AND MAYORS GIVEN INSTRUCTIONS

Registrations Will Be Taken at Regular Precinct Voting Places Between Hours of 7 a.m. and 9 p.m.

     Following President Wilson’s proclamation of Friday, setting June 5 as selective draft registration day, Governor Nat E. Harris received a telegram from Provost Marshal General E. H. Crowder Saturday morning directing him to order the several county registration boards of Georgia to organize and prepare to take this registration.
     Through Adjutant General J. Van Holt Nash, who will supervise the Georgia registration, orders were sent out Saturday to every sheriff and the mayors of all cities of more than 30,000 population in Georgia to organize their boards, swear in their registrars and to report the perfection of such organizations to the adjutant general within five days. General Nash sent out these orders by wire and is forwarding by mail necessary blanks for making the report of organization back to him.
Each county board is to be composed of the sheriff, the clerk, the ordinary and a county physician in such counties as have county physicians.
     It is estimated that one registrar will be required for every 80 men to be registered.

Hours of Registration.
     The registration will be taken between the hours of 7 a.m. and 9 p.m., June 5, at the regular precinct voting places. Every man, sick or well, married or single, white or black, between the ages of 21 and 30, inclusive, will be required, under penalty, to register.
     In cases where a man is ill or expects to be absent from his place of residence on registration day, he may apply at once to the clerk for registration.
     Not only is there a jail penalty attached to failure to register, but like penalty attaches to failure on the part of registration boards, or members of such boards, to perform the full duties required of them.
     When a person has registered he will receive a registration certificate.
     The instructions as to how to answer the questions which will be asked of persons registering, emphasize the fact that the government does not desire that any man shall increase the misery of war by failure to qualify for exemption where other people are dependent upon him solely for support, yet , on the other hand, it is also made clear that the government does not propose that men who are eligible to draft shall “hide behind petticoats or children.”

Governor Names Boards.
     The governor has appointed the county boards of registration. These boards will have charge of the registration in their respective counties. The state of Georgia and war department will hold them responsible. They must see to the appointment of registrars in each precinct in their county and look after the registration and making out of returns and reporting to the governor or adjutant general.
     Owning to the fact that some counties have no county physicians; some counties have as many as three and four, and others have county physicians who live many miles from the county site, Governor Harris could not appoint the county physicians as a class, but had to select physicians to serve each county without respect of their employment by the counties.
     The following list shows the boards for the respective counties. The names appearing in the following order:
     First, the sheriff, who will be executive officer of the board; second, the clerk of the superior court, who will be secretary or clerk of the board; third, the ordinary; fourth, the physician for the board.

The Board, once organized, saw to the appointment of registrars in each precinct in the county to administer the registrations. In Berrien County these registrars included:

Franklin Otis Baker, farmer, Alapaha, GA
Seaborn Jackson Baker, County School Superintendent, Nashville, GA;
William Arthur Bradford, farmer, Adel, GA ;
Eugene F. Bussey, merchant, Enigma, GA ;
James R. Carter, farmer, Adel or Greggs, GA;
John Samuel Carter, farmer, Lois, GA
James Griffin Connell, farmer, Massee, GA ;
William Riley Crumpton, merchant, Lenox, GA;
William Montieth Evarts, farmer, Adel, GA;
Lyman Franklin Giddens, barber, Ray City, GA ;
Vinter B. Godwin, general merchandise salesman, Lenox , GA;
George Washington Gray, farmer, Enigma, GA ;
John D. Gray, farmer, Alapaha, GA;
Frank Griffin, farmer, Nashville, GA;
John T. Griffin, mail carrier, Nashville, GA;
Sims Griffin Griffin, farmer, Nashville, GA
William Henry Griffin, farmer, Nashville, GA ;
Adolphus Brown Hammond, farmer, Enigma, GA ;
Charlie Brown Harris, farmer and merchant, Enigma, GA
Samuel J. Harwell, druggist, Adel, GA ;
Edward L. Ivey, naval stores operator, Cecil, GA ;
Joseph J. Knight, cross tie camp manager, Milltown (Lakeland), GA
Perry Thomas Knight, minister, Milltown (Lakeland), GA;
Henry Lee Lovett, farmer, Sparks, GA ;
Ralph George Luke, bank cashier, Cecil, GA;
Perry Newton Mathis, bookkeeper for J.N. Bray Lumber Co., Cecil, GA;
Hady Calvin McDermid, farmer and doctor, Sparks, GA;
William J. McKinney, dry goods merchant, Sparks, GA;
Malcom J. McMillan, retail merchant, Alapaha, GA
B. G. Moore;
Henry Moore, Alapaha, GA
Irwin Newton Moore, farmer, Nashville, GA ;
Luther Glenn Moore, student, Sparks, GA;
Richmon Newbern, farmer, Massee, GA ;
Charles. S. Parham, salesman and teacher, Nashville, GA;
William Manning Pafford, dry goods salesman, Milltown (Lakeland), GA ;
Arthur Henry Robinson, clergyman, Adel, GA ;
Thomas Morgan Rowan, farmer, Nashville, GA;
W. Rowe;
David Asa Sapp, turpentine operator, Ray City, GA ;
James David Cooper Smith, dry goods merchant, Tifton, GA
H.C. Smith;
Early Hamilton Spivey, farmer, Bannockburn, GA ;
O. Sutton;
James Henry Swindle, merchant, Ray City, GA ;
Charles Oscar Terry, druggist, Ray City, GA ;
William Edwin Tyson, teacher, Lenox, GA;

Penalties for giving false testimony to Exemption Boards were published in local newspapers.

Penalties for giving false testimony to Exemption Boards were published in local newspapers.

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Nashville, GA Electric and Water Plants Built in 1907

In the south end of Berrien County it wasn’t until 1923 that Ray City  got electric lights and running water, although some residents installed their own carbide electric systems before that.

Here’s an old newspaper clipping about the power and water plants built in Nashville, GA in 1907. The contractor for the construction of the plant was W.P. Tittle.  Tittle later owned a Maxwell car dealership in Nashville.

Nashville Herald article on town's first power and water

Nashville Herald article on town’s first power and water.

Nashville Herald
February 16, 1956

Electric and Water Plants Built in 1907

      Nashville citizens reached the decision in 1907 that something should be done about improving the water supply and furnishing electric lights for the town.
      After employing engineers to draft plans for a combined water and light plant a contract was let to W. P. Tittle, who built the plant and installed the water mains and electric distributing system.
      After much grief in attempting to operate the light plant a deal was finally completed in 1928 when the Southeast Georgia Power Co., purchased the electric light plant for $50,000. The Southeast Georgia Power Co., in turn sold the plant to the Georgia Power Co., who operate the electric distribution for Nashville today.
       The water plant, which the city retained, has been improved from time to time and additions made until today it is one of the most complete in the state. The water department of the City of Nashville is today serving 1,065 customers through the water meters, quite an increase from the less that 100 customers who began using city water when the plant was first installed.

Additional Notes:

Southeast Georgia Power Co., located at Douglas, GA, served several communities in south Georgia with electricity…

The Georgia Power Company on January 28, 1930, purchased from the Southeast Georgia Power Company the complete electric distribution systems in the towns of Alma, Nichols, Nashville, Willacoochee and Broxton, together with the respective franchises under which these distribution systems were operated. It also acquired certain transmission lines in Baker, Coffee, Atkinson and Berrien counties, between Alma and Douglas, Douglas and Broxton, Broxton and Ambrose, Douglas and Willacoochee, and Willacoochee and Nashville.

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Berrien’s Black Doughboys: Camp Gordon Men

Camp Gordon Men from Berrien County, GA

During WWI, Berrien County sent its contingent of black soldiers to join the United States Army. While the Jim Crow Army would relegate many black soldiers to support roles, a few Berrien County men would fight in all-black combat units like the 370th Infantry “Black Devils” and the 367th Infantry “Buffalo Infantry.

Nationwide, more than 2.2 million black men were registered over the course of four draft registration calls, of which nearly 370,000 were drafted for induction into the Army. The draft was a lottery in which numbers written on pieces of paper (in red ink) were pulled from a bowl by the U.S. Secretary of War, Newton D. Baker. Every number represented one registrant from each local board who would be called in for examination and if accepted, would be inducted into service.

In March of 1918, 86 black men in Berrien County received their orders of induction.  The orders instructed the men to report to the local draft board in Nashville, GA on April 2, 1918 for examination.

WWI Order of Induction P. M. G. O. Form 1028

WWI Order of Induction P. M. G. O. Form 1028

Along with the Order of Induction the men received written instructions on what to wear and what to pack. They were informed of the consequences of failing to report – a court-martial and possibly the death penalty.  Dire warnings notwithstanding, some twenty of the Berrien County men failed to report on April 2, 1918 as ordered.  According to WWI Historian Jennifer D. Keene, illiteracy prevented some men from complying with written induction orders.  “In many rural southern regions, the control that white landowners maintained over their black workforce influenced the workings of local draft boards. Some land owners withheld draft notices that arrived in the mail or refused to read them to their workers. When these workers failed to report, the government listed them as deserters. White planters subsequently gained both the advantage of their continued labor and the chance to collect a $50 reward from the government whenever they felt inclined to turn in these so-called deserters.”   A scandal over the reward for capture of deserters led to the dismissal of one Berrien County draft board member.

Form 1028A Instructions to Selected Men

Form 1028A Instructions to Selected Men

Important Notice to all Men Selected for Military Service and Ordered to
Report to a Local Board for Military Duty.

The day and hour specified on the Classification List of this Local Board, and on the order and notice of induction into military service which accompanies this notice for you to report to this Local Board for military duty, is the time that marks your actual obligation as a soldier of the United States.

Failure to report promptly at the hour and on the day named is a grave military offense, for which you may be court-martialed. Willful failure to report, with an intent to evade military service, constitutes desertion from the Army “of the United States, which in time of war is a capital offense.

Upon reporting to your Local Board, you will not need, and you should not bring with you, anything except hand baggage. You will not be permitted to take trunks or boxes with you on the train. You should take only the following articles: A pair of strong, comfortable shoes to relieve your feet from your new regulation marching shoes; not to exceed four extra suits of underclothing; not to exceed six extra pairs of socks; four face and two bath towels; a comb, a brush, a toothbrush, soap, tooth powder, razor, and shaving soap. It will add to your comfort to bring one woolen blanket, preferably of dark or neutral color. This blanket should be tightly rolled, the ends of the roll should be securely bound together, and the loop of the blanket thus formed slung from your left shoulder to your right hip.

You should wear rough, strong clothing and a flannel shirt, preferably an olive-drab shirt of the kind issued to soldiers.

Note.—Local Boards may have prepared, in the form of a rubber stamp, and stamp in below or on the back hereof any special instructions, such as a direction to request permission to eat and spend the last night at home, as it may desire to give.

On April 2, 1918 sixty-six African-American men from Berrien County, GA  reported to the draft board as ordered.  After passing examination, it appears the men were given permission to spend their last night at home.  On April 3, at Nashville, GA they boarded the Georgia & Florida train bound for Camp Gordon, near Atlanta.  The local draft board at Nashville, GA used Form 1029 PMGO, issued  by the Provost Marshall General’s Office, to document the entrainment of newly enlisted soldiers (images below). The forms include the draftee’s name, serial number, order number, date ordered to report, draft board, name of the mobilization camp, and the draftee’s occupation.

Statements from the Local Draft Board, Nashville, Berrien County, GA document African-American soldiers selected for the draft and entrained on April 3, 1918.

1918-4-2-berrien county-ga-wwi-inductions-1

1918-4-2-berrien county-ga-wwi-inductions-2

1918-4-2-berrien county-ga-wwi-inductions-3

1918-4-2-berrien county-ga-wwi-inductions-4

  1. Homer Lee Fordham, Alapaha, GA
  2. Dock Moore, Milltown, GA
  3. Wesley Myers, Bannockburn, GA
  4. John W. Faison, Ray City, GA
  5. Alexander Werkerson, Alapaha, GA
  6. Titus Griffin, Milltown, GA
  7. Willie Mullins, Alapaha, GA
  8. Joe Roberson, Ray City, GA
  9. Ben Cooper, Nashville, GA
  10. Collie Simons [Charlie Simmons?], Tifton, GA
  11. King Cooper, Nashville, GA
  12. Henry Mitchell Vaughn, Nashville, GA
  13. John Cleveland, Adel, GA
  14. Frank Mills, Milltown, GA
  15. Major Wilson, Adel, GA
  16. Charles J. Boggs, Ray City, GA
  17. Mack Leroy Cusack, Nashville, GA
  18. William Clarence, Sparks, GA
  19. Leroy McKinney, Milltow, GA
  20. Hilliard Brock, Nashville, GA
  21. Sam Gaines, Milltown, GA
  22. Marvin McArdle, Milltown, GA
  23. Tarba Bennett, Milltown, GA
  24. Elihu Hooker, Milltown, GA
  25. Joseph Williams, Adel, GA
  26. Garfield Baker, Ray City, GA
  27. Rommie Adams, Alapaha, GA
  28. Will Bell, Alapaha, GA
  29. Tom Sanders, Nashville, GA
  30. Thomas Howard, Ray City, GA
  31. Noah Schofield, Adel, GA
  32. Phane Jackson, Milltown, GA
  33. Elijah Walker, Hahira, GA
  34. Sam Bob, Alapaha, GA
  35. David Genrette, Ray City, GA
  36. Caleb Cooper, Nashville, GA
  37. Ethie Melvin, Milltown, GA
  38. Robert Jones, Ray City, GA
  39. Benjamin Greer, Lenox, GA
  40. Jerry Sheppard, Adel, GA
  41. Beamon Seymore, Adel, GA
  42. Dock Gunn, Nashville, GA
  43. Cleveland Sutton, Enigma, GA
  44. Willie Hutchinson, Adel, GA
  45. James Fullard, Alapaha, GA
  46. Arthur Bradshaw, Milltown, GA
  47. Charles Richerson, Cecil, GA
  48. Frank Jones, Bannockburn, GA
  49. Mose Flournoy, Adel, GA
  50. William Eddie Scruggs, Adel, GA
  51. Charley Stanford, Alapaha, GA
  52. Yancey Cowart, Enigma, GA
  53. Lazarus Burgess, Nashville, GA
  54. John Henry Williams, Alapaha, GA
  55. Grover Cleveland, Cecil, GA
  56. John Morris, Cecil, GA
  57. Isaac Flemming, Alapaha, GA
  58. David Pigford, Adel, GA
  59. Elzie Cooper, Nashville, GA
  60. Ezekiel Lavind, Adel, GA
  61. Snow Williams, Nashville, GA
  62. Peter Jones, Alapaha, GA
  63. Sidney Todd, Milltown, GA
  64. Ed Dupree, Milltown, GA
  65. James Givens, Alapaha, GA
  66. Nathaniel McClinton, Alapaha, GA

 

Camp Gordon historic marker, Dekalb County, GA

Camp Gordon historic marker, Dekalb County, GA

 

African-American troops at Camp Gordon, GA

African-American troops at Camp Gordon, GA

Camp Gordon was named in honor of Confederate General John Brown Gordon. After the war, he was a strong opponent of Reconstruction during the late 1860s. He served as a U.S. Senator from Georgia from 1873 to 1880, and again from 1891 to 1897. He also served as the 53rd Governor of Georgia from 1886 to 1890.  Gordon is cited as a prominent member of the Georgia Ku Klux Klan.

Like all southern military camps, those in Georgia operated under the segregation laws of Jim Crow. Federal prohibitions on black troops in combat meant that African American recruits trained and served in engineer service or labor battalions under white officers. -New Georgia Encyclopedia

Of the African American men who were drafted, 89 percent served in labor battalions or as dockworkers. The 42,000 men who did serve in combat were limited to the only two all-black combat regiments, the Ninety-Second and Ninety-Third Divisions. The camps were also segregated, as were most of the YMCA “Y-huts,” which served as places for leisure activities and often had camp libraries, stocked with the help of the ALA’s Library War Service  – American Library Association

Company_14_4th_Training_Battalion_Camp_Gordon_Georgia_September_18_1918_AfricanAmerican_troops

African-American training battalion with white officers at Camp Gordon, September 18, 1918

Camp Gordon, near Atlanta, was one of the largest training centers for Negro troops in the South, housing over 9,000 Georgia blacks by late 1917…Black troops there suffered the indignities common elsewhere, and the absence of any black commissioned officers increased their problems. Most black recruits were assigned to engineer or labor service battalions, where they were to perform tedious, often back-breaking tasks, loading and unloading cargo on both sides of the Atlantic. Since these battalions would have no black officer above the rank of corporal, Camp Gordon officials recruited a number of white sergeants, “specially and carefully selected as having had actual experience in charge of gangs of colored laborers.”  -John Dittmer, Historian

African-American Recruits receiving instruction from a white officer. Camp Gordon, Georgia., 03/04/1918, Image source: National Archives

African-American Recruits receiving instruction from a white officer. Camp Gordon, Georgia., 03/04/1918, Image source: National Archives

Segregation at the camp extended to recreational facilities, YMCA, library, hostess houses, and the soldiers clubs.  The War Camp Community Service Colored Soldiers’ Club of Atlanta, GA worked to bring books to African-American soldiers. The organization’s Secretary, Mr. Edward K. Nichols, writing to the American Library Association observed, “You are doubtless aware that throughout the South the public libraries are closed to the colored people. Hence every organization having in its power to extend library facilities to the colored people at large or any group of them has the opportunity of rendering a very needed and much appreciated service.” 

Colored Soldiers Club, Atlanta, GA

 

Camp Gordon, GA photo by E. Thompson. His title was "Negro soldier reading to boys who can't read. Camp Gordon, Ga. 1917-18" Library of Congress.

Camp Gordon, GA photo by E. Thompson. His title was “Negro soldier reading to boys who can’t read. Camp Gordon, Ga. 1917-18” Library of Congress.

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Carlos J. Boggs and the Buffalo Infantry of WWI

Charlie Parker was a Splendid Soldier

 

 

The “Valdosta Special” opened Georgia & Florida Railroad, October 1, 1908

Georgia & Florida Railroad

The Section Foreman in Ray City was Cauley May.

EXCURSION TO OPEN RAILROAD - The "Valdosta Special" came through Ray City October 1, 1908 to open the main line of the Georgia & Florida Railroad. The picture was made in Nashville, GA, showing passengers to first ride the new line.

EXCURSION TO OPEN RAILROAD – The “Valdosta Special” came through Ray City October 1, 1908 to open the main line of the Georgia & Florida Railroad. The picture was made in Nashville, GA, showing passengers to first ride the new line.

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Georgia & Florida Railroad No. 100 passenger car

Georgia & Florida Railroad No. 100 passenger car

Georgia and Florida Railroad, January, 1955. Wendell and Necie Rogers with Engine 507 at the Nashville, GA depot. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

Georgia and Florida Railroad, January, 1955. Wendell and Necie Rogers with Engine 507 at the Nashville, GA depot. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

 

T.J. Sutton and Ed Benton with Georgia and Florida Railroad Engine No. 507 at the depot in Nashville, GA, March 24, 1955. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

T.J. Sutton and Ed Benton with Georgia and Florida Railroad Engine No. 507 at the depot in Nashville, GA, March 24, 1955. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

Nashville Herald
Thursday, February 16, 1956

Main Line of Ga. & Fla. Railroad Opened in 1908.

          The Georgia & Florida Railroad (now Railway) is a part of the rich history of this section of Georgia, and in a large measure has contributed to the growth and expansion of Berrien County, and the counties adjacent.
      This railroad furnished a more stable means of transportation than was available in the early days, despite the multiplicity of small log lines.

Organized in 1906
         The Georgia & Florida was organized by Mr. John Skelton Williams in 1906 and at that time consisted of the following roads:
         The Augusta and Florida Railroad, 49 miles in length from Keysville to Swainsboro.
         The Millen & Southwestern Railroad of 42 miles between Millen and Vidalia.
         The Douglas, Augusta & Gulf Railroad, 76 miles between Hazlehurst and Nashville, via Broxton.
         The Nashville & Sparks Railroad twelve miles from Nashville to Sparks, GA.
         The Sparks Western twenty miles of log road between Sparks and Kingwood.

No Shops

         None of the roads had any shops except the Millen & Southwestern, other than a pair of heavy jacks and such hand tools as were needed in doing the general repair work in the operation of trains.
         The rolling stock was an odd assortment of all sorts of engines, a few log cars, a few box cars and two to four passengers cars.
         Out of this hodge podge assortment of rail lines and equipment the work of creating a going railroad business was started.
         Financial conditions of the railway became critical in 1913 and on March 27, 1915, receivers were appointed, which receivership continued until January 1, 1927 when the Georgia & Florida Railway was sold and deeded to The Georgia & Florida Railroad. Due to disastrous floods and heavy costs the Railroad again was ordered into receivership by the District Court of the United States.
         Despite it’s financial troubles the receivers have done a good job of increasing the rolling stock, installing Diesel engines, etc. and the road now ships the largest percentage of tobacco, turpentine and watermelons than any other road of it’s size.

Nashville Proud of G. & F.

         The Georgia & Florida Railroad continues to be well thought of in Berrien county and Nashville. For Nashville it is the only surviving rail link to the outside world, though passenger and mail service have long since been discontinued.
        The road serves as the principal freight hauler of merchandise and manufactured goods. Since the coming of the Tobacco Market it has to be especially valuable, and goes all out to give service to it’s patrons.
        It’s contributions to the growth of the section through which it traverses have been great, and though at times the railroad itself was in financial jam, there has been no movement that would develop this part of Georgia but the Georgia & Florida railroad could be depended upon to do it’s part.
         The first tobacco market in Georgia was on the Georgia & Florida railroad in 1917, when the farmers as well as railroads were asking for a market. A meeting of business men was held at Douglas and in just one hour the capital was subscribed. When the season opened in the late summer, the Red Warehouse with a floor space of 90×140 was doing business on the Georgia & Florida. The first tobacco was sold for 20 cents per pound, but today tobacco is gold in Georgia.

Georgia and Florida Railroad

Georgia and Florida Railroad

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