Boyette Sisters at Georgia State Womens College

Dorothy and Doris Boyette at Georgia State Womans College

Doris Boyett, of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA

Doris Boyett, of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA

Dorothy Boyett, of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA. 1945

Dorothy Boyett, of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA. 1945

In 1944, Doris Boyette was a senior at GSWC and her younger sister,  Dorothy “Dot” Boyette was a freshman.  Doris was born 27 Oct 1923; Dot was born May 14, 1926. The girls grew up just east of Ray City, GA, in the adjacent portion of Lanier County. Their parents were Eddie D. Boyette  and Mattie Deen Boyette.

At GSWC, Doris was living in Ashley Hall,  a dormitory for sophomores; her roommate was Clare Carson, who was president of the sophomore class.

October 4, 1944 GSWC Campus Canopy mentions petite blond Dorothy

October 4, 1944 GSWC Campus Canopy mentions petite blond Doris Boyette, of Ray City, GA

Among the Boyette’s 1945 classmates was Carolyn DeVane, also of Ray City, GA. There have been many other Ray City women of G.S.W.C. over the years.

Ashley Hall, Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA 1845

Ashley Hall, Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA 1845

The girls’ activities in 1944-45 included the Polio Drive, scrap paper salvage, planting the Camellia Trail, and dancing with those men from Moody Airfield.  The May 9, 1944 edition of the Campus Canopy student newspaper reported. “It’s boy trouble for Dot Boyette…which of the four do you intend dating Sunday night, Dot? – Gee, we wish we could get one date. ”

1945 women of GSWC at Saturday night dance with the men from Moody Airfield.

1945 women of GSWC at Saturday night dance with the men from Moody Airfield.

The October 4, 1944 school newspaper reported:

“There they were, standing all alone just waiting for us to ask them to dance…Men, men and more men and not one of them had a chance.
    To quote one Freshman, Ann Maddox, “It was wonderful just to look at a man.”
    The dance was swell, but that familiar tap on another’s shoulder could mean one of two things…height of ecstasy or depths of despair…’til the next girl broke. This from Lawanda McCellar, as if she were just tearing herself away from it all.
    “Course I wished my fella had been there,” sighed Mary Tharpe, but what chance would I have had with him if he had been.”
    Annes Jean NeSmith summed it all up in a few words…”Plenty of men, good dancers, nice plausible lines, and I can hardly wait ’til next Saturday night.”
    “I’m still overcome by the sight of those men, to express an honest opinion.” says Betsy Markert still in a daze.
    “All in all the opinion of Converse is that it was wonderful and everybody had a good time, but give us men. We see women all week, is the general idea.
    Favorable opinions were not limited to the college girls though. Several of the Moody Field boys were carefully eavesdropped on. Result: “I just can’t believe it, so many girls. If I were to write my mother and say 15 girls cut in on me she would say I was crazy drunk, or lying.”

The hit songs those college girls were swooning to in 1944-45?  The Campus Canopy mentioned:

In 1945, Dorothy Boyett was elected treasurer of the Baptist Student Union.  In the Winter Quarter, 1945 Dorothy “Dot” Boyette was elected to the Sophomore Council.  “Members of the house council check lights, cards and attend the simple cases of Student Government violation. They are elected at the beginning of each quarter to serve a term of three months.”  Dot Boyett also served on the advertising staff and the business staff of the Campus Canopy.

By late 1945 Dorothy Boyette left Georgia State Womans College and was working in Brunswick, GA.

Dot married Charles Gordon Howell. He was a grandson of Caswell Howell, pioneer settler and one of the first ministers of the First Baptist Church of  Milltown (now Lakeland), GA. Dot and Charles raised crops and children in Lakeland, GA. Their son, Charles Howell, Jr. became Chief of Pediatric Surgery at the Medical College of Georgia. Their grandson, Charles Howell III, is a professional golfer.  Dorothy Boyette died June 2,1985. Interment was at Lakeland City Cemetery, Lakeland, GA.

Doris Boyette married John Sears and moved to Atlanta, GA.

Obituary of Doris Boyette Sears

Doris Boyett Sears age 87, of Atlanta, GA, passed on Sunday, June 26, 2011. She was predeceased by her husband, John Sears, daughter, Susan Elaine Sears, sisters, Irene B. Smith and Dorothy B. Howell. She is survived by her daughter, Pamela McKinney of Lawrenceville, sister, Louise Davidson of Bonaire, GA, brother, Earl Boyett of Lakeland, GA. 2 grandchildren, Robert Morris and Jennifer Shelton, 4 great grandchildren, Kayla Shelton, Savannah Shelton, Avri Shelton and Joshua Morris, numerous nieces and nephews, cousins and extended family also survive. Mrs. Sears was a charter member of the Johns Creek Baptist Church, a member of the Senior Choir, a Food Pantry Volunteer and an avid Gardner. A Funeral Service to Celebrate the Life of Mrs. Sears will be at 3:00 P.M. on Thursday, June 30, 2011 at Wages Lawrenceville Chapel. Interment will follow in the White Chapel Memorial Gardens, Duluth.

Preacher Shaw and Susie Ray

Preacher Shaw and Susie Ray

Preacher Shaw, circa 1926. Image courtesy of Bryan Shaw.

Preacher Shaw, circa 1926. Image courtesy of Bryan Shaw.

Preacher Shaw was a son of Ray City, Georgia. He was a popular baseball player, sometimes politician, and salesman of Berrien County. His given name was Fondren Willie Mitchell Shaw, but at a young age he acquired the nickname “Preacher,” a moniker that stuck for life. As a boy, Preacher Shaw attended Pine Grove School and the Kings Chapel School, located just across the county line, in Lowndes County. His parents, Jesse Shelby “Dock” Shaw and Susie Bullard, had attended the same school in their youth.

From Bryan Shaw’s family newsletter comes the following:

 It was at the Kings Chapel school that Preacher Shaw met his life-long companion, Susie Ray, daughter of Charles M. Ray and Maggie Hutto Ray. She had finished her educational training by attending Georgia State Womans College [now Valdosta State University], and had been teaching at Pleasant Vale and Indian Camp  schools. She had just started teaching at Kings Chapel when she met young Preacher Shaw.  It is not clear if he was finishing his formal education of if he was attending a function there and made her acquaintance.

The only automobile that the couple had to court in was the rumble-seat coupe that belonged to Susie. But it was adequate and they were mar- ried on November 13, 1927 in the home of Susie’s parents by Elder Aaron Knight. The couple set up house for a brief time with Susie’s parents, where their first child, Latrelle was born July 14,1928. They shortly thereafter moved into the Martha Carter place just off of the Old Valdosta Highway near Barker Road. Here their second child Lawanna was born March 26, 1930. During this time, Preacher was farming the property of Susie’s parents. The family then moved into a small home on Indian Camp Road about a mile west of the Ray homeplace. It had been the old White Pond Church, which had been moved to the Ray property by Preacher and Susie’s brothers, Henry and Buck. By November the following year 1931, Preacher and Susie had moved over to the “Dock” Shaw place, helping on that farm. They lived in the log house that Preacher had been born in 25 years earlier. Their third child, a son Otis was born on November 16, 1931. Early the following year in 1932, Preacher suddenly suffered an attack of appendicitis, and was rushed to the Little Griffin Hospital in Valdosta. His recovery was slow, and Susie stayed at the home of Preacher’s sister, Cora Shaw Griffin. Susie visited Preacher daily while walking to the hospital and back carrying baby Otis.

Preacher worked the Ray property until about 1937, when he went down to Jacksonville, Florida to work for his brother-in-law, Lewis Ennis, Mary Idell’s husband. Lewis owned and  operated a service station and oil company in Avondale, Florida. Preacher would drive back and forth from Jacksonville to Ray City about once a month, while Susie worked the family farm. The children were attending the New Lois School about this time, walking the four mile distance each way, daily. One of their fondest childhood moments was when Preacher brought home a used girl’s bicycle from Jacksonville. With the birth of their fourth and last child, Gerald on April 5, 1938, Preacher found employment a little closer to home, working on a construction crew, building roads near Thomasville. However this opportunity turned into tragedy, when one of the construction tractors turned over on top of him. He was hospitalized in critical condition for sometime before finally recovering. He carried scars from that accident the rest of his life. All during the months and years that Preacher was working out of town, Susie was home, raising the children and working the farm. She was also an accomplished seamstress, sewing all of the children’s clothes. She was often sought after for seamstress work by many of her neighbors and her work was well known throughout the county. When Preacher recovered from the accident, he returned to work the farm, and the family moved in and lived with Susie’s widowed mother. About 1940 Mrs. Ray deeded the Ray homeplace and 100 acres of the farm in the 134th land lot to Susie.  Maggie Ray died August 2, 1942.

About 1945, Preacher went to work in Nashville for Jake Rutherford in the fertilizer business. This began a long venture in the feed, seed, and fertilizer business that lasted over two decades. He worked at the Leah Stallings Feed and Seed, Perkins Warehouse, and John David Luke at the Nashville Mills. He was a “drummer”, a natural-born salesman, selling seed and fertilizer, then traveling through out Berrien and the surrounding counties, buying back the farmers’ crops. Then he would sell them seed for the next crop year.

Reprint courtesy of Bryan Shaw.

Ray City’s Women of G.S.W.C

Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA

Georgia State Womans College, 1925.  (Now known as Valdosta State University)

Georgia State Womans College, 1925. (Now known as Valdosta State University)

From 1922 to 1950 the state college in Valdosta, Georgia now known as Valdosta State University operated as a four year college under the name Georgia State Womans College.  A number of Ray City women attended the college during this period. Here are a few who appeared in available yearbooks:

Dorothy Boyette

Dorothy Boyette, of Ray City, GA. Attended Georgia State Womans College in 1944.

Dorothy Boyette, of Ray City, GA. Attended Georgia State Womans College in 1944.

Margaret Carter, a the daughter of Cora and Yancy F. Carter, attended G.S.C.W in 1935:

1935 Margaret Carter, sophomore, Georgia State Womans College

1935 Margaret Carter of Ray City, GA, sophomore, Georgia State Womans College

Frances Clements, daughter of Hod P. Clements of Ray City, GA excelled at technical studies.  After completing high school at  the Ray City School she went on to enroll at Georgia State Womans College in 1943:

Frances Clements, of Ray City, GA. A 1944 sophomore at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA.

Frances Clements, of Ray City, GA. A 1944 sophomore at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA.

Annie Ruth Clements  was born at Ray City, GA about 1924, a daughter of Mary Elizabeth Lee and  William A. Clements. Her father was a farmer and butcher at Ray City. She enrolled at Georgia State Womans College in 1943:

Ann Ruth Clements of Ray City, GA, a 1943  freshman at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA (now Valdosta State University.)

Ann Ruth Clements of Ray City, GA, a 1943 freshman at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA (now Valdosta State University.)

Geraldine Fletcher Giddens, born Geraldine Hester Fletcher on February 2, 1924, was a daughter of Eliza Carter and Zachariah Fletcher. She  married Norvell “Joe” Giddens, and made her home at Ray City, GA while attending G.S.W.C.:

Geraldine Fletcher Giddens was a resident of Ray City, GA while attending Georgia State Women's College during the 1940s.

Geraldine Fletcher Giddens, 1943 freshman class photo, Georgia State Womens College. She was a resident of Ray City, GA while attending G.S.W.C. during the 1940s.

Mary Luelle Giddens was born at Ray City,  GA on November 22, 1915, one of thirteen children born to Eugene Madison Giddens and Georgia Ida Rigell. She attended G.S.W.C. in the 1930s:

Louelle Giddens, 1934 student of Georgia State Womans College.

Luelle Giddens, 1934 student of Georgia State Womans College.

Thera Ollis Hambrick attended  G.S.W.C. in the 1930s and later served as librarian at the school. She wrote  Valdosta State College: The First Half Century:

Thera Hambrick, of Ray City, GA, 1935 freshman at Georgia State Womans College.

Thera Hambrick, of Ray City, GA, 1935 freshman at Georgia State Womans College.

Mary Lee, a daughter of  William D. “Bill” Lee and Mollie Bell Clements,  was born February 6, 1915 in Berrien County, GA:

Mary Lee of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College (nka Valdosta State University)

Mary Lee of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College (nka Valdosta State University), 1933

Mollie Idelle Lee was born Feb 28, 1919 near Ray City, GA  in  that part of Berrien County that was cut into Lanier County in 1920.   She was the youngest child of Mollie Clements and William David Lee.

Mollie Idelle Lee, 1937. Freshman at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA.

Mollie Idelle Lee, 1937. Freshman at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA.

Judy Moore attended G.S.W.C. while a resident of Ray City, GA in the 1950s.

Judy Moore, of Ray City, GA,  1950 freshman at Georgia State Womans College.

Judy Moore, of Ray City, GA, 1950 sophomore at Georgia State Womans College.

Elsie Quarterman  attended Georgia State Womans College in Valdosta, GA (now known as Valdosta State University.) The 1931 Pine Cone, the college annual, gives her home town as Ray City, GA.  Elsie graduated from G.S.W.C. in 1932 with a Bachelor of Arts degree and went on to become a noted ecologist:

Elsie Quarterman, 1931.

Elsie Quarterman, 1931.

Doris E. Swindle was born and raised in Ray City, GA.  She was a daughter of  Sarah Ellen  “Stell” Daniel and James Henry Swindle. Her father was a farmer and merchant of Ray City, and served in the Georgia House of Representatives in the 1930s. She died in an automobile accident in 1941.

1934 Doris Swindle, Georgia State Womans College

1934 Doris Swindle, Georgia State Womans College

Grace Swindle was the youngest daughter of  Sarah Ellen  “Stell” Daniel and James Henry Swindle, and sister of Doris Swindle and James Aaron Swindle.

Grace Swindle, Freshman, Georgia State Womans College.

Grace Swindle, Freshman, Georgia State Womans College.

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Minnie Gordon Sloan Married Meritt E. Johnson

Minnie Gordon Sloan was a daughter of  Ray’s Mill farmer James M. Sloan and Martha Gordon Sloan, born July 17, 1876. She married Meritt (or Merritt) E. Johnson on January 17, 1904 in Berrien County, GA.  Meritt Johnson was born January 22, 1878 in Berrien County, GA and raised in Rays Mill (later Ray City), GA.  He was a son of James R. Johnson (born February 1, 1858 in Johnson County, NC; died May 17, 1928 in Lakeland, Lanier County, GA) and Mary Elizabeth (Truett) Johnson (born July 7, 1848 in Jackson County, MS; married April 1, 1874 in Berrien County, GA; died June 6, 1915 in Lakeland, GA); he  was a brother of James Randall Johnson, subject of previous posts.

Marriage certificate of Merritt E. Johnson and Minnie Gordon Sloan, January 17, 1904, Berrien County, GA.

Marriage certificate of Merritt E. Johnson and Minnie Gordon Sloan, January 17, 1904, Berrien County, GA.

After marriage, Minnie and Meritt made their home on Main Street in Lakeland, GA, where they maintained their residence for many years.

According to  Georgia’s Official Register, 1937, Meritt E. Johnson was a product of local Berrien County schools and studied law on his own at home.  He taught school for five years before being admitted to the bar. He was a Baptists, Mason, Odd Fellow, Knight of Pythias, Woodmen of the World, and member of the Farmers’ Union. From 1901 to 1908 he served as Justice of the Peace. From  1904-1908 he was on the Berrien County Board of Education, and from 1910 to 1916 he was a school trustee in the Knight school district. In politics he was a democrat; he served as city councilman in Lakeland from 1919 to 1926 and as city recorder form 1929-1931.  He was solicitor in the Lanier County Court from August 15, 1929 to August 15, 1933 , and again from August 15, 1935  to August 15, 1937.

Census records attest that  Meritt wasn’t always so bookish.  In 1910 census of Milltown, GA, he was working as a carpenter, building houses. In 1920, he was a barber, working on his own account in his own shop.  Some time before 1930, son Julian A. Johnson took over the barbershop, and Meritt Johnson entered legal practice in Lakeland.

Children of Minnie Gordon Sloan and Merritt E. Johnson:

  • Blanche Estelle Johnson, born November 4, 1904, attended Georgia State Womens College –
  • Julian Aubrey Johnson, born October 15, 1907
  • Hoke Smith Johnson, born May 28, 1910

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Frances Clements’ 1944 Rendezvous with Frogs, Formulas, and Figures

Frances Clements, daughter of Hod P. Clements of Ray City, GA and subject of previous posts ( A Shower for Frances Clements),  excelled at technical studies.  After completing high school at  the Ray City School she went on to enroll at Georgia State Womans College, now known as Valdosta State University, entering with the freshman class in 1943. In 1944,  her extra-curricular activities included the Math-Science Club.

Frances Clements, of Ray City, GA.  A 1944 sophomore at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA.

Frances Clements, of Ray City, GA. A 1944 sophomore at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA.

Beauty and brains, Frances Clements went out for the Math-Science Club. The activities of the club reflected the war-time enrollment at the college:

Math Science Club

 Our rendezvous with frogs, formulas, and figures combines our interest into one club, the Math-Science Club.  There are three divisions: Chemistry; Biology, and Mathematics; and the students may become a member of any one of these groups according to their chief interest. These divisions present monthly programs and bring the practical nature of the sciences to the members.

      This year the club has endeavored to do its bit for the war effort by contributing part of the dues, and proceeds from a dance and the scrap paper drive to the War Bond Scholarship Fund.

Clements Cousins at G.S.W.C.

In the 1940s Annie Ruth Clements and Frances Clements, Ray City cousins, both attended Georgia State Womans College, now known as Valdosta State University.  The Clements girls  were descendants of one of the pioneer families of Ray City,GA and were both  granddaughters of John Miles Clements (1859 – 1937).

Ann Ruth Clements (L) and Frances Clement (R), of Ray City, GA. In 1943, the Clements girls were freshmen at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA (now Valdosta State University.)

Ann Ruth Clements (L) and Frances Clement (R), of Ray City, GA. In 1943, the Clements girls were freshmen at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA (now Valdosta State University.)

Annie Ruth Clements was born at Ray City, GA about 1924, a daughter of Mary Elizabeth Lee and  William A. Clements. Her father was a farmer and butcher at Ray City.  She was a  sister of Billie Clements who would later own the Victory Soda Shop in Ray City. The long-time Ray City landmark opened in 1943, during WWII, and during the time Annie Ruth was  attending G.S.W.C.

Frances Clements was born about 1925, also at Ray City, GA, a daughter of Alma Florence May and Hosea “Hod” P. Clements.  Her father was a graduate of Georgia Normal College and Business Institute, and a prominent businessman of Ray City.  After college, Frances Clements married Lawrence Carter and the couple made their home in Valdosta.

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Geraldine Giddens

Geraldine Giddens, 1944, G.S.W.C. Sophomore

Geraldine Giddens, 1944, G.S.W.C. Sophomore

 

Geraldine Giddens was a resident of Ray City, GA in the 1940s while she attended Georgia State Womens College in Valdosta, GA (now Valdosta State University).

http://www.valdosta.edu/library/find/arch/pinecone/1944/1944pg78.html

Born Geraldine Hester Fletcher on February 2, 1924, she was a daughter of Eliza Carter and Zachariah Fletcher. She spent her childhood in Dasher, GA just south of Valdosta.

Geraldine Fletcher married Norvell “Joe” Giddens, and the young couple made their home at Ray City, GA.  He was a son of Emma Ward and Albert Sidney Giddens, of Cook County.

Geraldine Fletcher Giddens was a resident of Ray City, GA while attending Georgia State Women's College during the 1940s.

Geraldine Fletcher Giddens, 1943 freshman class photo, Georgia State Womens College. She was a resident of Ray City, GA while attending G.S.W.C. during the 1940s.

In 1944, Geraldine Giddens was a member of the Sociology Club at G.S.W.C.

SOCIOLOGY CLUB

The Sociology Club, composed of the majors and minors in this field, has carried on a variety of activities during the 1943-44 year.
    One meeting in each quarter was devoted to the rolling of bandages at the Red Cross room.
    A dance was sponsored for the benefit of the War Bond Scholarship Fund, and a War Savings Stamp was brought to each meeting by all members.  A donation to the Chapel Fund was made from the club treasury.
    The club became foster parent s to a refugee child in a colony in England by a $50 contribution which provides a bed for the child for a year.
    An agency membership was taken out in the Georgia COnference on Social Welfare for 1944, and the issues of the  bulletin “Georgia Welfare” received from the Conference were donated to the  library.
    Programs during the year were related to various concerns in the field of social work.  Outside speakers were brought in whenever possible.

“LANCASTER, Calif. — Geraldine Hester Fletcher Giddens, 87, of Lancaster, Calif., formerly of Valdosta, Ga., passed away Tuesday, April 19, 2011. Arrangements are handled by Halley Olsen Murphy Funeral Home, Lancaster, Calif. — Halley Olsen Murphy Funeral Home”

Geraldine Fletcher Giddens

Geraldine Fletcher Giddens

“Granny Giddens was born on February 2, 1924. She went home to be with the Lord on April 19, 2011. She grew up in Valdosta, Georgia with a large happy family of 10 siblings. Moved to California in 1955. Lancaster became her home in 1968. Granny had 3 children. Jerry and Joey Giddens that she missed very much and her daughter Shirley Griffiths of Lancaster. She had several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Her happiest memories were taking care of them. Work of any kind made Grannys day, she needed to be busy. Over the years she had worked at Howard Johnsons, Mayflower Gardens and Whole Wheatery. Later in life she kept busy having garage sales and making sure Panache Salon was clean and orderly. Her daily visits to the senior center for lunch and their bus trips were a blessing. Her down home strength and life lessons will take us through, this sad time and will help us to continue to grow. Granny was loved and will be missed by all that knew her.

 

Louelle Giddens’ Student Activities at G.S.W.C.

A previous post noted that Luelle Giddens, of Ray City, attended Georgia State Womans College (now known as Valdosta State University) from 1933 to 1935 where she was a member of the Euclidean Club.  Among her other activities while at G.S.W.C. she was also a member of the Valdosta Club and served as Treasurer of the International Relations Club.

As a graduate of Valdosta High School, she was also a member of the Valdosta Club:

The Valdosta Club is an organization composed of  the alumnae of the Valdosta High School.  It holds monthly meetings of a social nature, including luncheons, tea dances, and specialty features.  The purpose of the club is to promote a friendly feeling between the boarding and day students, to emphasize the social life of the college, and to be a means of interpreting the activities of the day students and the town.

Doris Swindle, G.S.W.C.

Doris Swindle Smith (1916-1941)

Doris E. Swindle was born and raised in Ray City, GA.  She was the daughter of  Sarah Ellen  “Stell” Daniel and James Henry Swindle. Her father was a farmer and merchant of Ray City, and served in the Georgia House of Representatives in the 1930s.

Doris Swindle attended school in Ray City and graduated with the Ray City School Class of 1930. In 1934 and 1935 Doris Swindle attended Georgia State Womans College, now known as Valdosta State University, Valdosta GA.

Mrs. Doris Swindle Smith, 25, of Ray City and Jim I. Wisenbaker, of Lowndes county, were killed and five others were injured when two automobiles crashed Sunday night south of Valdosta.  Mrs. Smith was a daughter of J.H. Swindle, a former member of the Georgia Legislature, and Wisenbaker was a member of prominent Lowndes county family.

Grave marker of Doris Swindle (1916-1941), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, GA.

Grave marker of Doris Swindle (1916-1941), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, GA.

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Elsie Quarterman, Noted Ecologist, Once Resident of Ray City

As a young woman, noted ecologist and centenarian Elsie Quarterman resided at Ray City, GA.   Canopy Roads of South Georgia notes, on June 9, 2014, “Aunt Elsie stepped over the final fence, dying peacefully at her home in Nashville, Tennessee, attended by her nephew Patrick and his wife Ann, as she had wanted.”

 

Elsie Quarterman, 1931.

Elsie Quarterman, 1931 Pine Cone, Georgia State Womans College. Elsie Quarterman was a resident of Ray City, GA during the time she attended the college.

Elsie Quarterman, a daughter of Alla Irene Peek  and David Sinclair Quarterman, was born 1910 in Lowndes County, Georgia.  Her father worked as a Superintendent of City Works for the City of Valdosta, GA and her early childhood was spent in the city, where her family resided at 115 Varnedoe Street. Her grandparents, Susan Evalyn “Susie” Sinclair and Thomas Quarterman, lived in a house on Hill Avenue.

Elsie Quarterman, high school student at Hahira, GA.

Elsie Quarterman, high school student at Hahira, GA.

Sometime around 1918-19 the Quarterman family removed from Valdosta to a  farm owned by Elsie’s father, located on Ousley road in Militia District 663 of Lowndes County.  Living at the farm house along with her parents and siblings were her Scottish grandmother, and grandfather who was disabled. In 1921, the Quarterman family moved again to a farm located on the Hahira road in Georgia Militia District 1307, the Cat Creek District of Lowndes County. Elsie attended high school at Hahira.  In the census of 1930, 19-year-old Elsie Quarterman is enumerated in her parents household on the family farm.

After high school, Elsie Quarterman attended Georgia State Womans College in Valdosta, GA (now known as Valdosta State University.) The 1931 Pine Cone, the college annual, gives her home town as Ray City, GA.  Elsie graduated from G.S.W.C. in 1932 with a Bachelor of Arts degree.

Elsie Quarterman, Georgia State Womans College diploma, 1932.

Elsie Quarterman, Georgia State Womans College diploma, 1932.

Elsie Quarterman later attended Duke University where she earned a Master of Arts in Botany, and a Ph.D. in Plant Ecology. After  achieving her doctorate, she joined the faculty of Vanderbilt University, and became the first woman to  chair a department of that institution. She became a noted pioneer in the field of ecology with important publications on southern hardwood and pine forests.

Amazon.com lists four books authored by Dr. Elsie Quarterman:

  • A summer check list of the vascular plants of the highland region (Publication – the Highlands Museum and Biological Laboratory) – Unknown Binding (1947) by Elsie Quarterman
  • Southern mixed hardwood forest: Climax in the southeastern coastal plain : U.S.A – Unknown Binding (1962) by Elsie Quarterman
  • ALLELOCHEMIC EFFECTS OF PETALOSTEMON GATINGERI ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ARENARIA PATULA IN CEDAR GLADES – Unknown Binding (1975) by Barbara H & Quarterman, Elsie Turner
  • Potential ecological/geological natural landmarks on the interior low plateaus – Unknown Binding (1978) by Elsie Quarterman

For more on the life of Elsie Quarterman and Quarterman family history, see Elsie Quarterman (1910-), Centenarian Ecologist

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