Marvin and Arlie Purvis

 

Ray City home of Guy Marvin Purvis and Arlie Guthrie Purvis on the southeast corner of Main Street and Park Street, Ray City, GA.

Ray City home of Guy Marvin Purvis and Arlie Guthrie Purvis on the southeast corner of Main Street and Park Street, Ray City, GA.

Marvin and Arlie Purvis lived in this Ray City home from the 1920s to about 1942.

Marvin and Arlie Purvis lived in this Ray City home from the 1920s to about 1942.

Ray City home of Marvin and Arlie Purvis

Ray City home of Marvin and Arlie Purvis

Guy Marvin Purvis (1899-1975) was a merchant of Ray City, Ga. He was a son of Mary Brantley and Lee Arnold Purvis. For about 20 years he owned Purvis Grocery Store in the town.  His wife, Arlie Guthrie Purvis (1890-1976), was a sister of Effie Guthrie KnightJohn Guthrie, Sam Guthrie.

The Purvises lived in the house on the southeast corner of Main and Park streets. They had a nice houseful of furniture, dining room set, bedroom set in the master bedroom, iron beds in the other rooms. They had a nice little spool-leg dropleaf dinette set in the kitchen. In 1930 they had a radio, which was a rare thing in Ray City in those days. There were only eight radio sets within the city limits, the other owners being James A. Grissett, John D. Luke, Henry Swindle, Walter Altman, John Simpkins, Joseph Johnson and Fannie Parks.  The average cost of a radio in 1929 was around $139 dollars. In terms of comparable “affordability” for an average person in today’s dollars (2010 index) this would be like making a $7,600 purchase (relative worth based on nominal GDP per capita index – see MeasuringWorth.com). The house had a back porch and an outhouse at the very back of the lot.

Behind this house was the farm of Perry Swindle. Mr. Swindle and his wife Cynthia “Cynthy” Swindle.Perry Swindle had a large open truck and hauled goods and animals and people, too. He provided an annual excursion for the Ray City School students to Twin Lakes, GA.

By about 1941 Marvin could no longer make a go of it operating his Ray City store. Right after the Purvises lost the store, they moved about half a mile south on Park Street to live  with Arlie’s sister, Effie Guthrie Knight, for a few months. This was right before WWII and Marvin got a temporary job helping to build the bridge over Beaverdam Creek. He was probably making more money at this job than he had made for quite some time in his failing store. Some of the other Ray City men working on road construction were Cranford P. Bennett, Edwin L. Mobley, Oscar H. Scarborough, and Clementine Mikell.

After a short while Marvin & Arlie Purvis moved into town where they rented some rooms.  They were living in an apartment that had been partitioned off a part of the home of Mrs. Nancy Mobley on North Street. Mrs. Mobley was a widow and  had living with her in the main part of the house her daughter and son-in-law Eloise Williams Johnson and Bernard L. Johnson, and Eloise’s half sister Doris Mobley. Eloise was a teacher at the Ray City School.

Arlie Purvis made a little money baby sitting Jack Patten, son of Mabel Edith Cook and Thomas Penland Patten.

Later Marvin and Arlie moved across the street to live in the house on the southwest corner of North Street and Bryan Street in Ray City, GA.

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1940s Ray City Home of Arlie and Marvin Purvis

Arlie and Marvin Purvis lived in this Ray City, GA home in the 1940s.

Arlie and Marvin Purvis lived in this Ray City, GA home in the 1940s.

Over the years, Arlie Guthrie and Marvin Purvis lived in several Ray City homes. Earlier, the Purvises lived in a house on the southeast corner of Main Street and Park Street, where Hazel Hall and Reid Cox boarded with them.

The house  they occupied in the 1940s, pictured above, was situated on the southwest corner of North Street and Bryan Street in Ray City, GA.  They lived here with their youngest son June Errol Purvis, whom everyone called Nip, and Nip’s dog, Sun.

This residence is just one block north of the home of Hazel Hall and Reid Cox, who were dear friends.  When you entered the front door, this house was divided by a wide hall from front to back.  On the right side there was a living room, a bedroom which Arlie used as a sitting room and a  a sewing room, and a kitchen with a little dinette. Arlie was seamstress and did sewing for people.

On the left was a big front bedroom where the Purvis’ kept their best furniture, and used as their master bedroom. Next was where the Purvis’ had created within the house a separate little apartment  with a large bedroom  and a little kitchen where Mable Cook and Thomas Patten resided with their son, Jack Patten.

Next door to the Purvises was the residence of Mr. & Mrs. Tom Cox, who also had living with them  Kate Nobles, widow of Jasper Nobles.

Living behind the Purvises were the Wilsons, brother and sister Charles and Farlene Wilson Manning, and their mother, Gladys C. Lee. Farlene’s daughter Kathy later married Hal Harp. Charles Wilson married Mary Nell
Herring and moved to the house on the southwest corner of Johnson Street and Pauline Street.

Marvin Purvis had been the proprietor of a general merchandise store in Ray City but had lost the store some years earlier; At the time  the Purvises were living in this house, Marvin was working as a meat cutter.

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Checking on Citizens Bank of Ray City

Ray City Home of Reid Hearn Cox and Hazel Hall Cox

Home of Reid Hearn Cox and Hazel Hall Cox.  The Coxes were residents of Ray City in the 1940s

Home of Reid Hearn Cox and Hazel Hall Cox, Jones Street, Ray City, GA. The Coxes had this home built in 1939. Hazel's father, Lawrence Cauley Hall, resided with the Coxes in the 1940s.

Cox Residence, built 1939
Home of Reid Hearn Cox and Hazel Hall Cox, Jones Street, Ray City, GA. The Coxes had this home built prior to 1940. Hazel’s father, Lawrence Cauley Hall, resided with the Coxes in the 1940s.

Hazel Jeanette Hall (1918-1974) was a daughter of Lawrence Cauley Hall and Eula Belle Swindle, of Ray City, GA.  She was a granddaughter of Mary Etta and Redding D. Swindle, and Cassie Lee and John Lewis Hall.  Hazel’s sister, Eunice Hall, was the wife of Polk Cheshire Brockman, of Atlanta, who was a pioneer in the recording of country music.

Reid Hearn Cox (1912-1966) was a salesman of music supplies. He originated from Eatonton, GA, a son of Charles Patterson Cox and Mattie Reid Hearn, and studied at Mercer University in 1932.

Hazel Jeanette Hall and Reid Hearn Cox were married in 1937 in Atlanta, GA.

1937-feb-18-eatonton-messenger_hazel-hall-married

Eatonton Messenger
Thursday, February 18, 1937

Miss Hazel Hall Weds Mr. Reid Cox

      The Druid Hills Presbyterian church formed the setting yesterday for the marriage of Miss Hazel Jeannette Hall and Reid Hearn Cox which was a beautiful event taking place at 5 o’clock. Rev. William M. Elliot, Jr., the pastor, performed the ceremony in the presence of a large gathering of relatives and friends of the young people.
      The interior of the church was beautifully decorated for the nuptials.  Palms and ferns banked the altar, and tall standards of callas with seven-branched candelabra hold-holding white tapers completed the decorations. Preciding and during the ceremony Mrs. Haskell Boyter, pianist, presented a program of music and Le Roy Bledsoe sang.
      Acting as bridesmaids were Miss Jane Cox, sister of the bridegroom, and Miss Dorothy Brockman, wearing dresses of gold blister satin with short coasts fashioned with repeplums  and gold satin sandals. Their flowers were arm bouquets of Pernet roses, snapdragons and delphiniums in pastel shades tied with ice-green ribbon.
      Mrs. Polk Cheshire Brockman was her sister’s matron of honor. She ware the gold satin dress in which she was married.  It was worn with a coat, trimmed with sable fur.  Her hat was an off-the-face model of brown maline, and she carried an arm bouquet of talisman roses.
      Miss Ann Brockman, niece of the bride, was the ring -bearer. Her dress was a floor-length empire model of ice-green satin and she wore a yellow ribbon in her hair.  She carried the ring in a calla, showered with valley lilies.
       Jasper Sojourner. Dr. S. L. Morris, Jr., Dr. E. C. Moore and C. Roy Arnold were ushers.
       Entering with her brother, Polk C. Brockman, by whom she was given in marriage, the bride was met at the altar by the groom and T. Pitts Davidson, who acted as best man. Her blond beauty was further enhanced by her wedding gown of white satin, fashioned along princess lines with a high cowl neck and leg-o-mutton sleeves which ended in a point over the hands and trimmed with self-covered buttons. The same buttons trimmed the waist at the back and the full skirt flared into a short train.  Her long veil of illusion fell from a coronet cap, beaded in seed pearls and crystals and she carried a sheaf of calla lilies.
    After the ceremony Mr. and Mrs. Brockman entertained at a reception at their home on Springdale road for the bridal party and out-of-town guests.  Mrs. Swindle Hall, mother of the bride, and Mrs. C.P. Cox, the bridegroom’s mother, received with Mr. and Mrs. Brockman and Mr. and Mrs. Cox.
    In the dining room the table was covered with a point Venice lace cloth, and the center decoration was a bride’s cake placed on a mound of pastel flowers. Yellow candles in pastry candlesticks embossed with orange blossoms, callas and lilies of the valley, were used.  Miss Jane Cox kept the bride’s book and Misses Dorothy Brockman, Essie Bell Brockman and Mesdames J. B. Sojourner, H. E. Montgomery and H. A. Brockman assisted in entertaining.  Roses, snapdragons and delphiniums were arranged throughout the house.
    The bride and groom left for a wedding trip. The former wore a two-piece traveling suit of apricot wool with brown accessories.  Her flowers were a shoulder corsage of orchids.
    Mrs. Cox is the daughter of Mrs. Swindle Hall, of Ray City, Ga. For the past several years she has made her home with her brother and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Polk Cheshire Brockman, on Springdale road.  Mrs. R. D. Swindle, of Ray City, grandmother of the bride, was a guest at the wedding. W. H. Hearn, of Eatonton, grandfather of the bridegroom, was also present. – Atlanta Constitution, February 6th.

The newlywed Coxes first boarded with Arlie Guthrie and Marvin Purvis in their home on Main Street, Ray City, GA. Marvin Purvis was a merchant of Ray City, and the Purvis’ grocery store was on the south side of Main Street near Lyman F. Gidens’ Barber Shop and just east of the tracks of the Georgia & Florida Rail Road. The Purvises were among Ray City’s better-off families; the Purvis household had been one of the first in town to acquire a radio.

In 1939, the Coxes built a house of their own  on the northeast corner of North Street and Jones Street, Ray City, GA.

 

Hazel Hall Cox and Reid Hearn Cox became Ray City homeowners in 1939.

Hazel Hall Cox and Reid Hearn Cox became Ray City homeowners in 1939.

Eatonton Messenger
October 19, 1939

Mr. and Mrs. Reid Cox are now building a new home at their home in Ray City. Reid, you know, is the son of Mrs. Charles P. Cox and the grandson of W. H. Hearn.

Liberty Magazine, June 8, 1940. Liberty was a weekly magazine, originally priced at five cents and subtitled, "A Weekly for Everybody." It was said to be "the second greatest magazine in America," ranking behind only The Saturday Evening Post in circulation. It featured contributions from some of the biggest politicians, celebrities, authors, and artists of the 20th Century. It ceased publication in 1950.

Liberty Magazine, June 8, 1940.
Liberty was a weekly magazine,  said to be “the second greatest magazine in America,” ranking behind only The Saturday Evening Post in circulation. It featured contributions from some of the biggest politicians, celebrities, authors, and artists of the 20th Century. It ceased publication in 1950.

After the Coxes moved into their new home, the Purvises moved just a block down the street to a home on the corner of North Street and Bryan Street.

Hazel Hall Cox was a woman of fashion, “a real glamour girl, always made up – high heels, fancy hairdo.” Hazel Cox took all the women’s magazines, Cosmopolitan, Ladies Home Journal, Colliers, Liberty, Life, etc., and after reading she shared them with Arlie Guthrie Purvis.

The Coxes later moved to the Atlanta area where Reid developed and manufactured high capacity dryers used in laundromats all over the country.

Reid Hearn Cox died April 22, 1966, and Hazel Hall Cox passed on November 18, 1974. They  are buried at Decatur Cemetery, Dekalb County, GA

Graves of Hazel Hall Cox and Reid Hearn Cox, Decatur Cemetery, Decatur, GA.

Graves of Hazel Hall Cox and Reid Hearn Cox, Decatur Cemetery, Decatur, GA.

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Ray City Girls Form Athletic Club, 1947

Ray City, Ga in the 1940s took particular pride in the girls athletic teams of the Ray City School.  The local newspapers were full of stories about the girls basketball team challenging the neighboring communities or competing in tournament play. After the construction of the gym at the Ray City School hometown pride swelled even further.  The gym, which could seat 1,100 spectators, was dedicated in 1947. That year the Ray City girls organized their own Athletic Club.

1947-Ray-City-Girls-Athletic-Club

The Nashville Herald
September 18, 1947

Ray City Girls Form Athletic Club and Name New Officers

RAY CITY – The Ray City High School girls met September 9 in order to form an Athletic club and elect officers.
They are: Louise Williams, president, Virginia Dampier, vice president, Carolyn Scarborough, secretary and treasurer, Jean Studstill reporter.
Other members of the club are Farlene Wilson, Judith Moore, Dianne Miley, Helen Wood, Winona Williams, Ruth Webb, Betty Jean Huff, Marlene Knight, Jeanette Fender, Hilda Faye Register, Peggy Johnson, Lullene Rouse, Jeraldine Sirmans, Edith Monk, Betty Rose Purvis, Carolyn McLendon, Betty Jo Cook, Hazel Gray, Mary Register, Carolyn Register.

Winona Williams, 1948, Ray City High School

Winona Williams, 1948, Ray City High School

Helen Wood, 1948, Ray City High School

Helen Wood, 1948, Ray City High School

Jean Studstill, 1948, Ray City High School

Jean Studstill, 1948, Ray City High School

Judy Moore, of Ray City, GA, 1950 freshman at Georgia State Womans College.

Judy Moore, of Ray City, GA, 1950 freshman at Georgia State Womans College.

Diane Miley, 1948-1949 school photo.

Diane Miley, 1948-1949 school photo.

Peggy Johnson, 1949, Ray City High School

Peggy Johnson, 1949, Ray City High School

Betty Jean Huff, 1949, Ray City High School

Betty Jean Huff, 1949, Ray City High School

Lullene Rouse, 1950, Ray City School

Lullene Rouse, 1950, Ray City School

Betty Jo Cook, 1949, Ray City High School

Betty Jo Cook, 1949, Ray City High School

Betty Purvis, 1950, Ray City High School

Betty Purvis, 1950, Ray City High School

Hazel Croy, 1950, Ray City High School

Hazel Croy, 1950, Ray City High School

Geraldine Sirmans, 1948, Ray City High School

Geraldine Sirmans, 1948, Ray City High School

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Checking on Citizens Bank of Ray City

Canceled checks drawn on the Citizens Bank of Ray City, Ray City, GA document some of the local businesses that Effie Guthrie Knight transacted with during 1927.

1927 check drawn on the Citizens Bank of Ray City and made payable to Dr. Folsom.

1927 check drawn on the Citizens Bank of Ray City and made payable to Dr. Folsom.

As the check above shows, Dr. George Hill Folsom came to Berrien County, GA some time prior to 1927. He established his home in Ray City where he engaged in general practice. A check in the amount of $1.00 might have been typical payment for an office visit in that time.

1927 check written by Effie Knight to C.O. Terry, and drawn on the Citizens Bank of Ray City.

1927 check written by Effie Knight to C.O. Terry, and drawn on the Citizens Bank of Ray City.

Written the same day as the previous check, this check to Ray City pharmacist, C. O. Terry,  may have been to fill a prescription written by Dr. George Hill Folsom.

Check drawn on the Citizens Bank of Ray City in payment to G. M. Purvis, made out in the amount of two dollars and fifty cents, and signed by Effie Knight.

Check drawn on the Citizens Bank of Ray City in payment to G. M. Purvis

Another check written by Effie Knight  is made out to G.M. Purvis.  Guy Marvin Purvis owned a general merchandise store in Ray City, GA.  Furthermore, he was Effie’s brother-in-law so naturally she’d be inclined to do business there.

 A check made out July 5, 1927 to G.V. Hardie in the amount of twelve dollars and seventy cents, and drawn on the account of Effie Knight at The Citizens Bank of Ray City.

A check made out July 5, 1927 to G.V. Hardie in the amount of twelve dollars and seventy cents, and drawn on the account of Effie Knight at The Citizens Bank of Ray City.

In the 1920s, Gordon Vancie Hardie opened up the first gas station in Ray City, GA. The check above may have been payment for service on Effie Knight’s car.

 

Ray City Officers Take Seat on January 14, 1929

Ray City News articles from 1929 give insight into the town’s social, business, and political leadership of the time:

Ray City News, January 3, 1929

Ray City News, Jan 3, 1929
City Officers Take Seat on January 14

The followning city officers were elected in the election held in the early part of December, L. S. Giddens, mayor, J. D. Luke, J. A. Purvis, Y. F. Carter, W. H. E. Terry, councilmen.
J. M. Studstill opposed Giddens for mayor.  W. G. Altman, J. S. Clements and W. W. Woods were on the opposite ticket for councilmen.
The new officers will  be sworn in Monday night –text illegible– L. F.  Giddens over Edmond Griner.

Lyman Giddens

Mr. Lyman F. Giddens – better known as “Judge” – served the town as mayor, city clerk and justice-of-the-peace. As mayor he was involve in the effort to bring a power plant and electric lights to Ray City, GA.