South Georgia State Normal College For Young Ladies

In 1913, South Georgia State Normal College opened at Valdosta, GA. The school became Georgia State Woman’s College in 1922 , Valdosta State College in 1950, and Valdosta State University in 1993.

 

ANNOUNCEMENT

1913

SOUTH GEORGIA

STATE

NORMAL COLLEGE

For Young Ladies

VALDOSTA, GEORGIA

 

ARCHITECT’S DRAWING OF FIRST BUILDING.

Architectural rendering of the first building to be built on the campus of the South Georgia State Normal College, Valdosta, GA

Architectural rendering of the first building to be built on the campus of the South Georgia State Normal College, Valdosta, GA

 

The Board of Trustees

Hon. W. S. West, Chr.               Valdosta, Ga.
Hon. W. L, Converse, Sect.       Valdosta, Ga.
Hon. C. R. Ashley, Treas.           Valdosta, Ga.
Hon. A. C Ward, Jr.                   Douglas, Ga.
Hon. E. H. Beck                        Barney, Ga.
Hon H. M. Mcintosh                Albany, Ga.
Dr. R. C. Woodard                   Adel, Ga.
Hon. H. H. Tift                         Tifton, Ga.
Hon. J. Hansell Merrill             Thomasville, Ga.

EX OFFICIO

Dr. D. C. Barrow, Chancellor of the University of Georgia Athens, Ga.

Hon. M. L. Brittain, State Superintendent
of Schools Atlanta, Ga.

The Faculty

The President
Mr R. H. Powell

Professor of Pedagogy and History of Education.
Mr. J. M. Guilliams

Superintendent of the Training School
Miss Lillian Rule

Professor of Mathematics and Physics
Mr. J. F. Wood

Professor of English and History
Mr. W. J. Bradley

Professor of Domestic Science and Arts
Miss M. Katherine Christian

Director of Agriculture and Manager of the
Boarding Department
Mr. J. E. Creel

Associate Professor of English and History
Miss Elizabeth McElreath

Teacher of Art and Manual Training
Miss Frances Ruth Carpenter

The Faculty (Continued)

Teacher of Nature Study and Geography
Miss Alice Pritchard

Teacher of School Music
To be elected

Assistant Teacher in English and Latin
Miss Nell E. Brimberry

Training Teacher, Third and Fifth Grades
To be elected

Training Teacher, 1st Grade,
To be elected

Matron
Mrs. R. H. Patterson

Secretary and Bookkeeper
Mr. W. P. Yarbrough

Introductory

On Thursday, January the Second, 1913, the South Georgia State Normal College will open for its first term’s work. The handsome building is nearing completion and will be ready for occupancy. A permanent maintenance fund has been appropriated by the Legislature. A strong faculty is being organized; and every ting is being done to guarantee from the start a normal college of highest efficiency — the equal of any in the South. Though the school opens its first year in January, it is believed that owing to the relatively small classes at first and the consequent greater personal attention, and to the exceptionally high average of training and experience of the faculty it will not be long before the classes are fully abreast of the yearly program of studies.

Location

The school is situated in Valdosta, at one of the most easily accessible points in South Georgia. The campus of sixty acres faces 2,100 feet on Patterson Street, the principal residence street of the city, and occupies a gently sloping hillside, which gives perfect drainage and affords an ideal school site. At the foot of the hill a small stream flows through a natural park of handsome trees, and at the top of the hill is a beautiful grove of virgin pines. The school has a campus of exceptional natural beauty.

Health and Sanitation

Valdosta enjoys an enviable reputation for health. The fall, winter and spring climate (when school is in session) is ideal. The school will be amply supplied with pure artesian water from the city waterworks;
and the sewerage system is of the most modern and thorough design. Every precaution has been taken to protect the health of the students.

The Faculty

The heart of any school is its faculty. The faculty of this school is being very carefully selected, and several members have already been employed. The names of those who have been elected appear at the beginning of these announcements. Most of them are well known in the State, and all are known for exceptional character and ability in their special lines. It is the determination of the Board of Trustees to leave nothing undone to secure for the South Georgia State Normal College as able teachers as are to be found in any school of its kind.

The Course of Study

The charter of the College defines one of the chief functions of the school as being “to prepare teachers for the public schools of Georgia.” The Board frankly accepts this function, and the course of study will be based largely on this purpose.

In grade, the school will extend about two or three years above schools of the rank of our best accredited high schools. Graduates of accredited schools of Group A will be admitted to the Junior year without examination (though with conditions in one or two required subjects); and students from other groups of accredited schools will be graded accordingly. Graduates from most accredited schools will enter the Sophomore Class. All other students will be admitted on examinations and previous records.

As to course of study, the work will be broad and thorough. Besides the professional work necessary to the training of teachers, there will be thorough and vital training in the usual academic studies and in the subjects pertaining to home activities and arts. It is, in a word, the purpose of the school to train for teaching by training for life.

The Building

Before the first brick was laid, a plan was made for all reasonable future development of the school, and prospective buildings are given their positions once for all. The general style of architecture adopted is a very beautiful form of Spanish Mission. As is indicated in the accompanying picture, the light colored walls, the great overhanging roof of rich, red tile, the open terraces, and abundant windows, give great beauty and comfort. The first building to be erected is a combination dormitory and administration building. It will eventually be used entirely for dormitory purposes. It is only two stories high, thus preventing the injury of much climbing of stairs. The rooms are all well ventilated. There is running water, hot and cold, in every room. Ample toilet and bath facilities are conveniently placed. The furniture, though simple, is neat and specially adapted to dormitory purposes. In short, the building is planned on most modern principles, by an architect of very wide and successful experience in school and dormitory building. It is sincerely believed that there is not a better building of its kind in the South.

Home Life

In the dormitory there are thirty bed rooms furnishing accommodations for about 65 students. Most of the rooms, thirteen by fifteen feet, will be occupied by two students. A few rooms, somewhat larger, will be occupied by three. The dining room and kitchen are planned with the same regard for health and comfort as are the bed rooms. The dormitory will be under an experienced matron, who has charge of the girls in all matters of their school-home life. The dining room will be in charge of one who knows the principles of foods and is experienced in providing wholesome and palatable meals.

No pains or expense will be spared to make the home life of the students comfortable, healthy and content.

Arrangements have been made with certain families in the city to take students as boarders; and where students have responsible relatives in the city, they may, with the approval of the president, arrange to board with them. Students in private homes will be required to conform to the same general rules as do those in the dormitory.

The Uniform

All students will be required to wear a uniform. Experts are now at work on the problem of a neat, serviceable, higienic, and economical uniform. Details may be had on request, about December first.

Religious Life

It is a fundamental principle of the school that the public institutions of a Christian State are or ought to be Christian institutions. While the school is wholly undenominational, every incentive will be given to the development of wholesome Christian sentiment and noble Christian character. The religious life of the students will be in every way encouraged. Students will be expected to attend the churches of their own membership or of that of their parent’s choice.

Expenses

Matriculation fee per year $10.00

(This year $5.00.)

Books, Stationery, etc $8.00 to $12.00

Board, Lodging and Laundry in Dormitory, per month $12.00

Clothes, about $35,00

Laboratory and Domestic Science Fees $1.00 to $4.00

The Matriculation fee is payable when the student enters each year.

Books, Stationery, etc., are paid for when purchased.

Of the board and lodging fee, $24.00 is payable January 2nd, and $36.00 March 1st.
Laboratory and Domestic Science fees are payable at the beginning of the course.

Students from other states may be admitted upon payment of $50.00 tuition in addition to the foregoing fees.

What a Student Should Bring With Her.

Each student should bring with her the following articles: Sheets, a blanket, a pillow, pillow cases, a bed spread, towels, napkins, a knife, a fork, a spoon, and such other articles of personal use as she may need.

Each student should also have for the protection of her health and comfort a good umbrella, over shoes, and a warm cloak or rain coat.

The teaspoon and fork should be of solid silver or of good plated ware, and should, if possible, have the student’s initials engraved on them.

Training School

A normal school is as strong as its training school. Care has been taken to place the training school on a sound basis from the start. It has been arranged to open with three grades (1st, 3d, 5th) and to add grades each year until the school is complete. Expert teachers are in charge of the training school, and every care is taken to give the children of the school the very best educational advantages.

A fee of $2.50 per half year is charged for each pupil. This fee is due January 2nd for this school year.

For Further Information, Address

R. H. POWELL, President

Valdosta, Ga.

Application for Admission

_____________ ____ ______________ 1912 ____

(Postoffice and date)

Mr. R. H. Powell,

President South Georgia State Normal College:

I desire to enter my daughter as a student in the South Georgia State Normal College at the opening of the school, January 2nd, 1913.

She agrees to observe the rules and regulations of the institution.

_______________________________________Parent

Please give the following information
—————————————-
Students full name:
________________________________________

Age on January 1st, 1913 _______________

School last attended ___________________

Grade completed ________________________

Graduate of a High School? yes or no ___

Student’s health? good or not __________

Note: Students should, where possible, have the Superintendent or Principal of their school write a confidential letter to the President of this College speaking of the advancement and qualifications of the student. The student should bring with her such diplomas and certificates as she may have received.

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1 Comment

  1. Stella Pierce said,

    June 16, 2019 at 10:54 pm

    On Sat, May 18, 2019 at 4:13 AM Ray City History Blog wrote:

    > raycityhistory posted: “In 1913, South Georgia State Normal College opened > at Valdosta, GA. The school became Georgia State Woman’s College in 1922 , > Valdosta State College in 1950, and Valdosta State University in 1993. > ANNOUNCEMENT 1913 SOUTH GEORGIA STATE N” >


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