The Calhoun Farm

The Calhoun Farm, near Ray City, GA, 1955.

The Calhoun Farm, near Ray City, GA, 1955.

The Calhoun Farm, situated southeast of Ray City on the shore of Banks Lake, originally made up a part of the Boyett family land.

John Boyette (1865-1938) and Mary Jane Sirmans Boyett (1867-1946). John Boyett's land consisted of more than 1000 acres situated in present day western Lanier County, GA. (Image courtesy of http://berriencountyga.com/)

John Boyette (1865-1938) and Mary Jane Sirmans Boyett (1867-1946). John Boyett’s land consisted of more than 1000 acres situated in present day western Lanier County, GA. (Image courtesy of http://berriencountyga.com/)

When John Boyett died in 1938, his estate was divided among his six sons and three daughters. Born near Rays Mill, GA in 1865,  John Boyett was a son of William Hill Boyett and Jemima Taylor Boyett.  By the time of his demise he had acquired 1,016 acres of land in land lots 496, 497, 516 and 517 in the 10th District. (see John Boyett (1865-1938) ~ Ray City Farmer)

His daughter, Lue Annie Boyett Calhoun, inherited just over 100 acres of the family farm and a little cash.

After inheriting land from her father, Lue Annie and her husband, Joseph Burton Calhoun, moved from their place in Florida back to the farm at Ray City, GA. (see The Marriage of Joe Calhoun and Lue Annie Boyett)

I. Mitchell Calhoun, grandson of Lue Annie and Joseph Burton Calhoun, recalls,

“Grandma always said that as a girl she got a little less than the boys. Granddaddy [Joseph Burton] Calhoun was an auto mechanic at the time and he and his family lived down in Florida, but he had been raised on a farm. My father [Joseph Berton Calhoun, Jr.] was around 20 at the time. So my grandparents moved back to the farm. A good part of the land Grandma inherited was wooded land so she traded some of her land with one of her brothers for cleared land so the final farm they had was around 80 acres. So that became the ‘Joe and Lue Annie Calhoun’ farm for the next 50 plus years. Granddaddy Calhoun died in 1972 and Grandma Calhoun died in 1993. The farm was passed on to their heirs and then was sold by them in the mid 1990s. I have many wonderful memories of the farm as a boy and as an adult. “

“Granddaddy Calhoun told me many times how they moved to the farm in 1938 and had to clear the trees to make a lane (about 100 yards) from Boyett Road up to the house site. Then he took the trees, that he cut down to clear the lane and the home site, to the saw mill and cut into boards and he used these boards to help build the house. It was a simple house but I spent many a night in it as a boy and as an adult. A few years after the land was sold (early 2000s) the house was torn down.”

Joseph Burton Calhoun was a civic minded farmer, a member of the Lakeland Masonic Lodge, and the Parent-Teacher Association. In the 1940s, the school lunchroom in Lakeland was supported by donations, and vegetables contributed from the Calhoun farm were among the lunchroom fare.

Joseph Burton Calhoun at work on the farm near Ray City, GA, circa 1955. (Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun)

Joseph Burton Calhoun at work on the farm near Ray City, GA, circa 1955. (Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun)

I. Mitchell Calhoun, grandson of Joseph Burton Calhoun recalls his grandfather at work in the barnyard out back of the farmhouse. 

“I used to like to watch him use the farm equipment.  He had a big John Deere tractor that he was very proud of.  It had a drum on the side that turned.  Some of the equipment (such as a corn grinder) had a similar drum.  He would line the tractor up with the equipment, place a wide leather belt that formed a circle around the two drums, then he would back up the tractor until the belt was tight.  He would then engage the drum on the tractor and through the belt this would engage the drum on the corn grinder, etc. and off everything went.  He would pour corn in the top and corn meal would come out one end.”

Joseph Burton Calhoun at work on the farm, circa 1955. (Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun.A

Joseph Burton Calhoun at work on the farm, circa 1955. Situated near Ray City, the farm was located within the boundaries of Lanier County, with the county seat at Lakeland, GA. (Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun.)

Ford automobile owned by Lueannie and Joseph Burton Calhoun, on the Calhoun Farm, 1955. (Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun)

Ford automobile owned by Lue Annie and Joseph Burton Calhoun, on the Calhoun Farm, 1955. (Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun)

Calhoun Farm, aerial view.

Calhoun Farm, aerial view. (Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun)

Special thanks to Mitchell Calhoun for the contribution of images and content for this post, and to Wilburn Thomas (Tom) Boyette for additional input.

The Marriage of Joe Calhoun and Lue Annie Boyett

Lue Annie Boyette, born May 27, 1899 was the only daughter of Mary Jane Sirmans and John Boyett,  subject of previous posts. Her father was a large landowner with a farm near Ray City in Berrien County.

Luannie Boyette & Joseph Burton Calhoun of Ray City, GA, 1919. Image courtesy of I. Mitcchell Calhoun.

Lue Annie Boyett & Joseph Burton Calhoun of Ray City, GA, 1919. Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun.

Lue Annie married Joseph Burton Calhoun on March 4, 1918 in Berrien County, GA.  She was a bride of 19; he was a 26 year-old groom, of medium height and build, blue eyed and blond haired.

http://cdm.sos.state.ga.us/u?/countyfilm,190170

Joseph Burton Calhoun, in army uniform, 1819.

Joseph Burton Calhoun, in army uniform, 1819. Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun.

Joseph Burton Calhoun was a son of Samuel Augustus “Gus” Calhoun and Rachel B. Bullard, born and raised in Rays Mill, GA (nka Ray City). Prior to marriage he had been living in Moultrie, GA where in 1917, he was employed by J.M. Bryan as a mechanic.

In 1918, the newlyweds were separated by the Great War, as Joe entered service in the U.S. Army. (Joseph Burton Calhoun ~ WWI Soldier)

Lue Annie and Joseph first made their home in Ray City, where they were enumerated in the 1920 census. Joseph continued his trade as an auto mechanic, now working on his own account. They had a house right on Main Street, where Lue Annie cared for their children, Alberta and Joseph B., Jr.

Enumeration of Luannie Boyette and Joseph Burton Calhoun, 1920, Ray City, GA

Enumeration of Lou Annie Boyette and Joseph Burton Calhoun, 1920, Ray City, GA

By the Census of 1930, Joseph and Lue Annie Calhoun had moved to Orlando, FL. There, Joseph Burton Calhoun continued his profession as an automobile mechanic. Lue Annie kept house and raised their three children.

Enumeration of Joseph and Luannie Calhoun, 1930 Census, 1403 South Division St., Orlando, FL

Enumeration of Joseph and Lou Annie Calhoun, 1930 Census, 1403 South Division St., Orlando, FL

http://www.archive.org/stream/15thcensuspopula326unit#page/n1083/mode/1up

In 1935, the Calhoun’s owned a home at 4074 35th Ave N. in St. Petersburg, FL. Joseph worked as a service station attendant.

Enumeration of Joseph B. and Luannie Boyette Calhoun, 1935 Florida State Census, St. Petersburg, FL.

Enumeration of Joseph B. and Lue Annie Boyette Calhoun, 1935 Florida State Census, St. Petersburg, FL.

When Lue Annie’s father,  John Boyett,  died in 1938, his estate was divided among his nine children. His only daughter, Lue Annie Boyett Calhoun, inherited just over 100 acres of the family farm. Lue Annie and her husband moved from Florida back to the farm near Ray City, GA.

For the next 3o years, Lue Annie and Joe raised their children and crops on the Calhoun farm. They were well known citizens of the Ray City and Lakeland area. They were members of the Ray City Baptist Church and the Lakeland Parent-Teacher Association. Joe was a member of  Masonic Lodge #434, and a member of the committee that oversaw the construction of a new Lodge Hall at Lakeland, GA in the 1940s.

Joseph Burton Calhoun died in 1972 and was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery in Ray City. For fifteen more years Lue Annie continued to live on the Calhoun Farm, but 1987 she returned to Florida to live out her final years.  She died in 1993 in Winter Garden, FL.  She was laid to rest at Beaver Dam Cemetery next to her husband.

James Arthur Grissett, Sr.

James Arthur Grissett (1900-1983)

James Grissett, Sr. was a mail carrier serving the Ray City area, and for some time he served as a U.S. Postmaster.  His wife, Lillie Crum Grissett, was known throughout the community for her kindness and assistance to those less fortunate. For years, she played the organ at Ray City Baptist Church. The Crum family had an automotive business in Lakeland.

James Arthur Grissett was a son of Sarah Martha Hendrix or Hendricks (1881-1975) and Lucian Hall Grissett (1862-1935). His father, Lucian, was born during the Civil War in North Carolina. His mother was a native of Georgia. As a boy, James A. Grissett lived with his family in Tattnall County, GA where his father operated a turpentine still and James attended school. The family lived in a rented home on Railroad Street in Claxton, GA where they were enumerated in 1910.

1910 Census enumeration of James Arthur Grissett in the household of his father, Lucian Hall Grissett, at Claxton, GA.

1910 Census enumeration of James Arthur Grissett in the household of his father, Lucian Hall Grissett, at Claxton, GA.

http://www.archive.org/stream/13thcensus1910po212unit#page/n642/mode/1up

Some time before 1920, James’ parents moved the family to Berrien County, GA and made their home in the Upper 10th District. At the enumeration of the 1920 census, Lucian Grissett was working there as a foreman for a turpentine operation, but by this time James had left his father’s household. In 1920, 19 year-old James A. Grissett was boarding with the Henderson family in the Mud Creek community, Clinch County, GA.  James Henderson was the manager of a naval stores outfit, and James Grissett was the commissary manager. The Henderson house was located on the Dupont Sirmans Road.

1920 Census enumeration of James Arthur Grissett, Mud Creek community, Clinch County, GA.

1920 Census enumeration of James Arthur Grissett, Mud Creek community, Clinch County, GA.

http://www.archive.org/stream/14thcensusofpopu244unit#page/n18/mode/1up

By 1922, James’ parents had moved to Ray City, GA where Lucian Hall Grissett attended the Missionary Baptist Church. About 1928, James A. Grissett married Lillian Crum. She was a daughter of Thomas J. Crum, subject of previous posts.

By 1930, James and Lillie Grissett had also relocated to Ray City, where they owned a home valued at $2200. James was employed as a letter carrier.

1930 Census enumeration of the Grissett Family in Ray City, GA.

1930 Census enumeration of the Grissett Family in Ray City, GA.

http://www.archive.org/stream/georgiacensus00reel338#page/n355/mode/1up

The Grissetts owned a large farm at Ray City, GA situated between Beaverdam Creek and Johnson Street. This land also had some frontage on Pauline Street and on Main Street. A house located on Pauline Street across from the Beaver Dam Cemetery was owned by the Grissetts, although they never lived there. The house may have been occupied by tenant farmers who rented some of the Grissett land.

James Arthur Grissett and Lillie Crum were the parents of five children.

  1. James A. “Jimmy” Grissett
  2. Anna Martha Grissett
  3. Elinor Grissett
  4. Gloria Jane Grissett
  5. Stephen Grissett

For many years, the Grissetts employed  a Mrs. Burnett. Mrs. Burnett’s son was a tenant farmer with the Grissetts. She lived in a house on Main Street, Ray City, GA. She walked to work every day, to the Grissett farm on the south side of Beaverdam Creek. Part of her job was to milk the cows, and she would bring home a pail of milk every day. She and her husband frequently made their evening meal on the fresh milk and cornbread.

Grissett-James-Arthur-and-Lillie-Crum

Graves of James Arthur Grissett, Sr. and Lillie Crum Grissett.  Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Related Posts:

John Boyett (1865-1938) ~ Ray City Farmer

Edward John Boyett was a brother of William Jackson Boyett.

John Boyett’s parents were among the pioneer settlers of Berrien County.  His father,  William Hill Boyett, came   to then Lowndes County area from North Carolina as a boy , about 1853, and later acquired land near present day Ray City,  GA.  John Boyett’s mother, Jemima Taylor, was born January 22, 1842 in South Carolina, and came to Georgia with her family in the early 1850s.   His parents were married on Christmas Day, Dec 25, 1856 in Berrien County, GA  exactly ten months after the county was formed.

Edward John Boyette and Mary Jane Sirmans, circa 1900.  Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun.

Edward John Boyette and Mary Jane Sirmans, circa 1900. Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun.

John Boyett was born on his mother’s 23rd birthday, January 22, 1865, during the Civil War.  At the time his father was serving in Columbus, GA making shoes for the Confederate States Army.   Folks Huxford reported:

“Mr. BOYETT volunteered Aug. 22, 1862, in Co., “I”, 50th Georgia Infantry Regiment, C.S.A., as a private.  He was detailed as a shoemaker Nov. 17, 1862 and sent to Columbus, Ga., where he rendered that service to the army until February, 1865.  He was paroled at Thomasville, May 11, 1865, and returned home.”

John Boyett grew up on his father’s farm in the 1300 Georgia Militia District, near Ray City.

On January 15, 1891 John Boyett married Mary Jane Sirmans in Berrien County, Georgia.

http://cdm.sos.state.ga.us:8888/u?/countyfilm,191792

According to  Mitchell Calhoun, grandson of the subject, “Edward John Boyett was a rather large farm owner in the early 1900s between Ray City and Lakeland, Georgia.  They lived along ‘Boyett Road’ and that general area.  There are quite a number of Boyett descendants in that area today.  And the Empire Church and the Beaver Dam Cemetery at the First Baptist Church of Ray City has a lot of their graves.”

Boyette Road near Ray City, GA.

Boyette Road near Ray City, GA.

John Boyett died in 1938 and his estate was divided among  his nine children.

Gravemarker of John Boyett, Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Gravemarker of John Boyett, Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Related Posts:

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Joseph Burton Calhoun ~ WWI Soldier

Joseph Burton Calhoun, 1918, in WWI army uniform, probably taken in Atlanta, GA. Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun.

Joseph Burton Calhoun, 1918, in WWI army uniform, probably taken in Atlanta, GA. Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun.

Joseph Burton Calhoun was a son of  Samuel Augustus “Gus” Calhoun and Rachel B. Bullard, born December 10, 1892 and raised in Rays Mill, GA (now Ray City).  In WWI he served in the U.S. Army.

Prior to WWI Joseph Burton Calhoun had been living in Moultrie, GA where in 1917, he was employed by J.M. Bryan as a mechanic. On June 5, 1917 he registered for the draft for WWI in Colquitt County. His draft card gave his physical description as medium in height and build, with light hair and blue eyes.

Nine months later, Joseph Burton Calhoun was back in Berrien County, GA where he married Louannie Boyette on March 4, 1918.

Joseph Burton Calhoun was inducted into the Army on December 18, 1917 in Moultrie, GA. He was photographed in uniform along with a fellow soldier, in what appears to be a souvenir post card print. After training with the  Machine Gun company of the 328th Infantry, Joseph Burton Calhoun served in the Military Police. Throughout WWI he was stationed with the Provost Guard Company at Camp Gordon, GA.  Calhoun apparently obtained a WWI souvenir from a returning soldier who had served overseas. A family heirloom is a bolt action .41 caliber Swiss rifle brought back from the war.

Swiss .41 WAFFENFABRIK-BERN-M78, serial # 187500. This rifle, pictured above, was acquired by Joseph Burton Calhoun during his service in WWI. The gun was manufactured circa 1885, one of a total of 228,000 ordered by the Swiss government. At the time of introduction, this rifle was one of the most advanced military rifles in Europe, but by WWI it was completely out-dated. (Image and information courtesy of Mitchell Calhoun)

Swiss .41 WAFFENFABRIK-BERN-M78, serial # 187500. This rifle, pictured above, was acquired by Joseph Burton Calhoun during his service in WWI. The gun was manufactured circa 1885, one of a total of 228,000 ordered by the Swiss government. At the time of introduction, this rifle was one of the most advanced military rifles in Europe, but by WWI it was completely out-dated. (Image and information courtesy of Mitchell Calhoun)

After the war Joseph Burton Calhoun returned to his wife and family in Ray City, GA.

(Special thanks to I. Mitchell Calhoun for contributions to this post.)

Updated 2/27/2016

Hero of Otranto Rescue Shot Dead

This blog has noted many stories of the sinking of the HMS Otranto, and the Berrien County men who lost their lives in the disaster of October 6, 1918. While many were lost, hundreds were saved.

Lieutenant Francis Worthington Craven, Commander of the HMS Mounsey

Lieutenant Francis Worthington Craven , while in command of  the HMS Mounsey, rescued hundreds of men from the sinking of the troopship HMS Otranto.

Lieutenant Francis Worthington Craven. While in command of the HMS Mounsey, Lieutenant Craven led the rescue of  hundreds of men from the sinking of the troopship HMS Otranto.

The Otranto after the collision was dashed to pieces on the rocks off the south Scottish coast with a probable loss of 372 American soldiers.
    Three hundred and one men were taken to Belfast by the British destroyer Mounsey, the only vessel which made an attempt at rescue in the terrific gale when the Kashmir, another vessel in the convoy with the Otranto, rammed the Otranto amidships.
Thirty minutes after the crash the British destroyer Mounsey, herself damaged by the heavy seas, appeared out of the haze in answer to the distress calls from the Otranto. When the destroyer maneuvered to get alongside Captain Davidson, of the Otranto, warned Lieutenant Craven, commanding the destroyer, not to make the attempt.
    When it was seen that Craven would make the attempt anyway the men were ordered to remove their shoes and heavy clothing and try to save themselves as best they could.
    The destroyer stood off about 100 feet and the gradually came nearer, against the great odds of high waves and the wind, which threatened momentarily to carry her entirely away from the Otranto or dash her to pieces against the side of the wounded vessel.

The Mounsey, under command of Lieutenant Craven, was the means of saving 696 people from H.M.S. Otranto. The sea was very rough at the time, and the Mounsey could not lie alongside the Otranto. She had to steam slowly past while the crew of the latter jumped to her deck, which maneuver she repeated several times. The bumping to which the destroyer was exposed during this operation can be easily imagined…

The following is from http://www.cairogang.com/adric-killed/craven/craven.html

DSO gazetted to Lieut. Francis Worthington Craven, R.N. In recognition of his services when H.M.S. ” Otranto ” was wrecked on the 6th October, 1918. H.M.S. ” Otranto” Was damaged in collision with the s.s. ” Kashmir ” whilst carrying a large number of American troops. Lieutenant Craven displayed magnificent courage and seamanship in placing H.M.S. ” Mounsey ” alongside H.M.S..” Otranto ” in spite of the fact that the conditions of wind, weather and sea were exceptionally severe. After going alongside and embarking a certain number of men, it was reported that the ” Mounsey” had sustained considerable damage, and that there was a large quantity of water in the engine room. Lieutenant Craven, therefore, left the ” Otranto,” but on finding the damage was not so serious as had been reported, he again went alongside, though he had previously experienced great difficulty in getting away. His action resulted in the saving of over 600 lives which would otherwise have certainly been lost. His performance was a remarkable one, and in personal courage, coolness and seamanship ranks in the very highest order.

An account by an American Edward O’Hara reads:

The Otranto made for the Irish coast off Belfast, while the Kashmir put on all steam and continued toward Glasgow. The Captain of the Otranto attempted to beach her, but instead hit one of the rocky precipices that skirt the shores of northern Ireland, and the ship was pounding herself to pieces when the two English destroyers came to her aid. Lieutenant Francis Worthington Craven, commanding the destroyer Mounsey, made a frantic attempt at rescue, but the other destroyer’s captain, evidently believing discretion the better part of valor, refrained from standing by. Otranto’s captain, knowing his ship was doomed, besought Lieutenant Craven not to come over, declaring it meant certain suicide for himself and his crew “Well, it must be suicide then,” was his reply, ” for we ae coming over” Then followed most awful and heartrending scenes. Pinched between sinking Otranto and rocky shores Lieutenant Craven’s ship was torn and wrenched while men flung themselves from the deck of the Otranto to that of the destroyer. Miscalculating, in their frenzy, many fell into the sea, others were crushed to death between tossing ships, while others in jumping to the Otranto’s deck sustained broken legs, arms or ribs or were otherwise injured. Three trips were made by the heroic Craven, landing alternately his injured, dying or dead cargo at Isley near Glasgow or at a point opposite Belfast, Ireland. Each time Otranto’s captain protested it was down-right madness, only to receive from Lieutenant Craven, who himself was badly hurt, the same cool, firm and unvarying reply that so long as his own boat could be kept afloat or the Otranto remained above water, he would keep coming. Just as he was leaving the Belfast pier for a fourth trip. Lieutenant Craven saw the Otranto make one frightful plunge and sink into the sea. And the mighty breakers rolled on in all their anger over the spot where the ill-starred Otranto had madly tossed and struggled a few moments before. It was providential that Lieutenant Craven had proceeded no further in his fourth errand of mercy, as in making for Belfast with all possible speed he was barely able to reach there. Experts declared that had he continued on into open ocean waters, his vessel could never have lived, so badly was she damaged. While Lieutenant Craven’s ship went into dry dock for repair at Belfast, he entered a hospital where his injuries received attention and where, six weeks later, we found him, with many others whom he had rescued, and learned from his own lips this story.

1918 Jul 9. The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Army Distinguished Service Medal to Lieutenant Francis W. Craven, British Royal Navy, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished service in a position of great responsibility to the Government of the United States, during World War I. While Commanding His Majesty’s destroyer MOUNSEY, Lieutenant Craven rescued 7 officers and 313 men of the American forces at sea on 16 October 1918.

1919 Feb 18 . Hansard records that Viscount Curzon tabled a question in the House of Lords, asking the First Lord of the Admiralty to “indicate what steps have been taken to recognise the bravery and seamanship of the officer in command of His Majesty’s ship “Mounsey”on the occasion of the sinking of His Majesty’s transport “Otranto” in a full gale off the Irish coast, which resulted in the saving of 600 lives, and also the services of the officers and men of His Majesty’s ship “Mounsey” on the same occasion?”. The response was that “My Noble Friend will be glad to know that the King has been pleased to approve of the appointment of Lieutenant Francis W. Craven to be a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order, and that he has received a letter expressing the high appreciation of the Admiralty. He has also been directed to submit the names of any officers and men considered deserving of awards.

After the war, Craven suffered financial difficulties.  Facing bankruptcy, he resigned from the Royal Navy in 1920.  He joined the Auxiliary Division of the Royal Irish Constabulary as a District Inspector, but just six weeks later he was killed in an Irish Republican Army ambush.

The New York Evening World
Friday, February 4, 1921

    “District Inspector Francis Worthington Craven was one of those killed in the ambuscade Wednesday at Ballinalee. He served in the navy during the war and received the American Distinguished Service Order.
    While commanding the British destroyer Mounsey he saved 600 American soldiers from the American transport Otranto, when that vessel was lost as a result of the collision with the steamer Kashmir off the Scottish Coast in October 1918.
    Inspector Craven retired from the navy with the rank of Lieut. Commander and only joined the Royal Irish Constabulary a few weeks ago.

Craven was killed on February 3, 1921 at Clonfin Ambush at Ballinalee, Granard, Longford. Francis Craven was initially wounded in the leg,and while he was bandaging it, another bullet struck him in the neck.

He was buried at Dalton-in-Furness St Mary. Lancs.

The Irish Independent
February 7, 1921

The funeral took place at Dalton, Furness, on Saturday of Lieut. Commander F. W. Craven, killed at Ballinalee. The body was brought to Dalton on Saturday morning from Dublin in charge of 2 survivors of the ambush.  The coffin was escorted from the station to the church by representatives of the R.A.F., a chief petty officer and blue jackets of the submarine service and local discharged sailors and soldiers.  An impressive service took place in the church which was crowded, and the streets were lined with people.  The bodies of Cadets Bushe and Houghton were also removed to England on the same boat. The wounded men are progressing favorably in Stevens’ Hospital

Jamie Connell worked at Moody AFB

After graduating from high school Jamie Alden Connell, of Nashville, GA   attended North Georgia College for two years and completed his degree at the University of Georgia. He served in WWII, and later worked at Moody AFB near Ray City.  Photos below are from the 1939 and 1940 editions of The Cyclops, year book of North Georgia College.

Jamie Connell. 1939. North Georgia College.

Jamie Connell. 1939. North Georgia College.

Jamie Connell. 1940. North Georgia College.

Jamie Connell. 1940. North Georgia College.

Jamie Connel, 1939, with other members of the Y.M.C.A. at North Georgia College.

Jamie Connel, 1939, with other members of the Y.M.C.A. at North Georgia College.

Obituary
Jamie Alden Connell

Jamie Connell, age 53 of Nashville, died October 17, 1973 in Tift General Hospital.  He was co-editor of the Berrien Press, and had been since it was organized in 1959.  He was a graduate of the University of Georgia, veteran of WWII; worked at the Nashville Post Office for several years; was public relations officer at Moody Field until his retirement two years ago. Funeral services were at the Nashville Baptist Church, and burial was in Westview Cemetery. Survivors: his mother, Mrs. Pearl Connell; 1 sister, Miss Dura Connell of Macon, and 1 brother – Ellis Connell of Warner Robins.

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Lessie & Rossie Futch at Home on Possum Creek

Lessie Guthrie and Rossie Futch were long time residents of Ray City, GA.  In the 1940s they lived for a short time in a small home on Possum Creek Road.  This house was located on the farm property of  Jim and Stell Swindle.

L to R: Lucinda Elizabeth Guthrie, Rossie Futch, Lessie Guthrie Futch.  Rossie and Lessie lived at this house on Possum Creek road near Ray City, GA for a short time in the 1940s.

L to R: Lucinda Elizabeth Guthrie, Rossie Futch, Lessie Guthrie Futch. Rossie and Lessie lived at this house on Possum Creek road near Ray City, GA for a short time in the 1940s. Later they lived in town on Jones Street,Ray City.

Family of Gus Calhoun, Berrien County, GA

Ray City farmer Samuel Augustus  “Gus” Calhoun, subject of previous post (Gus Calhoun, Ray City Farmer), was from boyhood a lifelong resident of the Ray City area. He was born May 25, 1868, a son of Elizabeth Bell and Joseph Calhoun.

Gus Calhoun married Rachel Bullard on May 19, 1891 in Lowndes County, GA.  She was a daughter of Mack Bullard and Luvellia Ray, and a niece of Green Bullard.  The Calhouns made their home in the Cat Creek community,  located about 10 miles southeast of Ray City in Lowndes County, GA (Census of 1900.)

Samuel Augustus Calhoun and Rachel Bullard, circa 1907. Image courtesy of Irvin Mitchell Calhoun.

Samuel Augustus Calhoun and Rachel Bullard, circa 1907. Image courtesy of Irvin Mitchell Calhoun.

By 1910 Gus Calhoun had moved his wife and children a few miles north to Ray’s Mill (nka Ray City), Berrien County, GA where he rented a farm next to his father-in-law, Mack Bullard.

Children of Samuel Augustus Calhoun and Rachel Bullard:

  1. Joseph Burton Calhoun (December 10, 1892  – February 23, 1972) married Lue Annie Boyette
  2. Lizzie Bell Calhoun (1895 – )
  3. Mack  Calhoun (1897 – )
  4. Robert Lee  Calhoun (1899 –  )
  5. Gussie  Calhoun (1900 – )
  6. James Dewey  Calhoun (June 22, 1904 – November 3, 1980) married Mary Elizabeth Brogdon
  7. Lula  Calhoun (1904 – )
  8. Cola L.  Calhoun (1906 – )
  9. Max Nathan Calhoun (1910-1970)
  10. Charles Birch Calhoun (1913-1995)
Rachel Bullard and Samuel Augustus Calhoun family, circa 1907. The 1910 census records show the Calhouns living at Ray City, Berrien County, GA during this time.The original photo was discovered in the attic of James Dewey Calhoun, Sr. and Mary Elizabeth Brogdon. About 1996, Irvin Mitchell Calhoun, great grandson of Samuel Augustus Calhoun had the photo professionally restored.

Rachel Bullard and Samuel Augustus Calhoun family, circa 1907. The 1910 census records show the Calhouns living at Ray City, Berrien County, GA during this time. The original photo was discovered in the attic of James Dewey Calhoun, Sr. and Mary Elizabeth Brogdon. About 1996, Irvin Mitchell Calhoun, great grandson of Samuel Augustus Calhoun had the photo professionally restored.

Rachel Bullard Calhoun died in 1935 and was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.  Shortly thereafter, Gus Calhoun retired from active farming and made his home  near Ray City on the property of his son, Joseph Burton Calhoun.

The family photo above  brings family memories to Irvin Mitchell Calhoun, great grandson of Samuel Augustus Calhoun:

My grandfather (Joseph Burton Calhoun, Sr.) is the teenage boy standing up the center of the photo. .. I remember Grandpa Gus living with my grandparents (Joseph Burton Calhoun, Sr. & Lue Annie Boyett) on their farm on Boyett Road in the latter years of his life.  I was born in 1941 so this must have been in the early to mid 1940s.

They built a small one room shack out back of the house and he lived out there.  We boys use to visit him often out there.   He was always doing things with us.

Samuel Augustus “Gus” Calhoun died January 5, 1957.  The funeral services were held at Ray City Baptist Church and was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery.

Obituary of Samuel Augustus Calhoun (1868-1957) of Berrien County, GA.  Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun.

Obituary of Samuel Augustus Calhoun (1868-1957) of Berrien County, GA. Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun.

Lakeland, Lanier County, GA
Jan 9, 1957
S.A. Calhoun Dies at 89 in Lakeland

    S.A. (Gus) Calhoun, 89, died Sunday afternoon at the home of his grandson, J.S. Gaskins, in the Allenville community of Berrien County after being in declining health for several weeks. 
    He was a native of North Carolina, but came to South Georgia as a boy and lived here all of his life.  Until his retirement some 20 years ago, he farmed in this area. He was a member at the Ray City Baptist Church.
    Survivors include three daughters, Mrs. Lizzie Brantley of Nashville, Mrs. Gussie Clark of Eloise, Fla. and Mrs. Lula Gaskins of Nashville; six sons C. B. Calhoun of Jacksonville, Fla. J. B. Calhoun of Lakeland, J. D. Calhoun and Mack Calhoun, both of Nashville, M. N. Calhoun of Winterhaven, Fla., and R. L. Calhoun of Jacksonville; 32 grand children; 50 great-grandchildren; and a number of nieces and nephews.
    Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 3:00 at the Ray City Baptist Church with Rev. G. C. Tuten officiating.

Special thanks to I. Mitch Calhoun for his research on Calhoun Family history , and for contributing images and content to this post.

Related Posts:

 

Beagles/Biggles/Beigles of Rays Mill

After the Civil War, John Jefferson Beagles, subject of previous post, and his family made their home in Alachua County, Florida and took their mail at Gainesville, FL.  He was enumerated there in 1870 as Jefferson Beigle.

John Jefferson Beagles

John Jefferson Beagles

The confusion over the family surname seems obvious, and additional recorded variations of the name include Bigles, Beigles, Beacols, Birgles, Bugles, or Beagley.  No doubt, the illiteracy of John Jefferson Beagles and Nancy Catherine Wright was a contributing factor in the proliferation of Beagles variants.

http://cdm.sos.state.ga.us/u?/countyfilm,77217

John Jefferson Beagles and Nancy Catherine Wright Beagles

John Jefferson Beagles and Nancy Catherine Wright Beagles. (Image courtesy of Berrien County Historical Foundation http://berriencountyga.com/)C 1870 Census enumeration of John Jefferson Beagles and family. 1870 Census enumeration of John Jefferson Beagles and family.

The previous post gave the account of John Jefferson Beagles Confederate service, and his time in the Pioneer Corps.

The 1870 census enumerated John Jefferson Beagles at age 40. He was working on a farm in Alachua County, FL.  His wife, Nancy Catherine, age 30, was keeping house. Living with them were their children Thomas,  Mena, William, and as yet unnamed infant daughter Mary.

1870 Census enumeration of John Jefferson Beagles and family.

1870 Census enumeration of John Jefferson Beagles and family.

http://www.archive.org/stream/populationschedu0128unit#page/n160/mode/1up

By 1880 the Beagles relocated to Cat Creek, about 10 miles southwest of Ray City. Their home was in Lowndes County,  in the 1307 Georgia Militia District. John Jefferson Beagles was enumerated as “John Biggles,” with his wife, Nancy, and children William, Mary, Ella, Bryant, Hiram, Nancy, and Lacy.

http://www.archive.org/stream/10thcensus0156unit#page/n99/mode/1up

In 1887 John Jefferson Beagles and his son, James Thomas Biggles, were involved in a family quarrel with in which James shot and killed his brother-in-law, Madison Pearson.  The shooting occurred at H.H. Knight’s store in Rays Mill, GA (now Ray City). Afterwards, J. J. Beagles helped his son to escape the crowd that witnessed the killing.

The younger Beagles fled the area but eventually returned to Berrien County to stand trial before Judge Augustin H. Hansell.  James Thomas Beagles was convicted and sentenced to serve time in the convict camp at Fargo, GA.

In 1900 John J. Beagles was enumerated in the 1144 Georgia Militia District, the Rays Mill district.  At age 70, he was working as a brick mason.  John and Nancy were living in a rented house. Their son, Hiram, was renting the house next door.

http://www.archive.org/stream/12thcensusofpopu179unit#page/n764/mode/1up

Nancy Catherine Wright Biggles

Grave marker of Nancy Catherine Wright Biggles, Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

In 1903, J. J. Beagles was left a widower when his wife of  42 years died.  Nancy  Catherine Wright Beagles died on the 5th of January.  She was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.  Her grave marker bears the surname, Biggles.

The census of 1910 shows the widower J.J. Beagles was  back in the Cat Creek District. living in the household of his son, L. O. Beagles.  At 81, the senior Beagles was still working on his own account as a brick mason.

Some time before 1920, John Jefferson Beagles died. He was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery, as stated above.


http://www.archive.org/stream/13thcensus1910po202unit#page/n512/mode/1up

Children of John Jefferson Beagles and Nancy Catherine Wright (1835 – 1903)

  1. James Thomas Beagles 1861 – 1911
  2. William “Willie” Beagles 1866 – 1957
  3. Mary Catherine “Minnie” Beagles 1868 – 1929
  4. Ella A. C. Beagles 1870 – 1928
  5. Bryant Beagles 1872 – 1954
  6. Hiram B. Beagles 1874 – 1957
  7. Nancy Catherine Beagles 1835-1903

 

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