New Lois School Reunion, 1997

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New Lois consolidated school, 4th, 5th, 6th Grades, 1933-34 the first year the school was opened. Identified front row left to right: Lucian Parrish, William Forehand, Elby Ray, –––––––– Buckholt, Lamar Weaver, Ronald Parrish, Alton Akins, Pete Akins, Bernys W. Peters. Second row: Amos Luke, C.H. Ray, Lucille Knowles, Camilla Comer, Edna Francis Fountain, Rudelle Lee, Alma Luke, Clementine Mickell. Back row: Hazel Sirmans, ––––––– Fountain, Myrtice Jordan, Helen Griffin, Verna Jordan, Lawanna Griffin. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

New Lois consolidated school, 4th, 5th, 6th Grades, 1933-34 the first year the school was opened. Identified front row left to right: Lucian Parrish, William Forehand, Elby Ray, –––––––– Buckholt, Lamar Weaver, Ronald Parrish, Alton Akins, Pete Akins, Bernys W. Peters. Second row: Amos Luke, C.H. Ray, Lucille Knowles, Camilla Comer, Edna Francis Fountain, Rudelle Lee, Alma Luke, Clementine Mickell. Back row: Hazel Sirmans, ––––––– Fountain, Myrtice Jordan, Helen Griffin, Verna Jordan, Lawanna Griffin. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

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New Lois School when the campus was at its peak. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

New Lois School when the campus was at its peak. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

 

New Lois School Reunion, 1997

New Lois School Reunion, 1997

News Clipping, November 1997

New Lois School students gather for reunion

        About 70 people gathered at the New Lois Community Center (former New Lois School) in Berrien County, for the fourth school reunion.
        There were former students, a principal, a county school superintendent, a school bus driver, lunchroom workers, spouses, family and friends.
        Howard Barker led the group in an opening prayer at the Nov. 1 event. Each person introduced himself, and several told of their memories in years past at New Lois School.
        Sixteen people attended the reunion for the first time. They were Roscoe Stallings of Nashville (former county school superintendent; Doris Lightsey McKinnon of Homerville; Billy Frank Hayes of Bonaire; Ines Hayes Wilson of Adel; Mattie Lou Stevens McLendon of Nashville; Vivian Browning of St. Augustine, Fla.; Royce Noles of Valdosta (former students); Alice Hayes of Bonaire; Dale Hollrah of Nashville; Wylene Lott of Nashville; E. W. Wilkerson of Ray City (spouses); Sherry Carter of Homerville; Christopher Carter of Valdosta; Beck Nash of Nashville; and Edith Peters of Ray City (family members of friends).
        Sarah Blanton, 92, of Valdosta, was recognized as being the oldest teacher present. She taught at Old Lois School. Dorothy Akins of Nashville was the oldest teacher present who taught at New Lois. Johnny Pat Webb, 81, was the oldest student from Old Lois and a bus driver for New Lois. Lucile Noles Browning of Lakeland was the oldest student from New Lois and Don Haskins was a principal teacher at New Lois. Gladys Sargent, 85, of Nashville, was the oldest lunchroom worker.
        According to the registry, Roma Parrish Krejci (former student) and her husband, Ed from Livingston, Texas, traveled the farthest.
        Nine were remembered who have died since the reunion in 1995: W.T. Barker, Nelda Nash Smith, Carroll Cumbus, Hazel Hancock Johnson, Juanita Weaver Fletcher and Ima Jean Ray Beck (former students); Rita Wilkerson Parrish and Victoria Bennett Coppage (former teachers); Ouida Knight Weaver (former lunchroom worker).
        A quilt was handmade and donated by Lucile Noles Browning, Leila Mae Noles Miller and Bessie Noles Johnson. At mealtime, a lucky ticket was drawn by Alton Akins. The winner was Jimmy Hand of Adel. The proceeds of the quilt will go into the New Lois Reunion Fund.
        The blessing was said by Johnny Pat Webb. Serving on the 1997 committee were Pete and Dorothy Akins, Howard Barker, Lucille Browning, Jo Ann McCray, Leila Mae Mller, Annie Belle Outlaw, Carolyn Griffin and Lamar Carter.
        Following lunch Mr. Stallings had a display set up on one of the kitchen tables, a replica of Old Lois School, the girls basement (outdoor privy) and some earlier desk used at Old Lois and other schools throughout the county in earlier years. All of the items were handcrafted by Mr. Stallings, who is known throughout New Lois Community and surrounding areas for his woodworking skills. When asked about the boy’s basement, he pointed to a sign which read “Boys to the creek.”
        It was requested that Carolyn P. Griffin entertain at the piano and several joined in the auditorium for a sing-a-long.
        The social committee for the next reunion is Philip Akins, chairman, Billy Cornelius, Furman Ray, Vivian Browning, Charles Donald Napier, Lamar Carter and Charlie Barker. The reunion will be at 10 a.m. the first Saturday in November 1999 at the New Lois Community Center.

 

Other faculty at New Lois School included Thera Hambrick, Arlo Futch SneadMaxie Snead Patten, Bernys Peters and Grace Swindle, of Ray City, GA.  Earl Weaver and Lella Forrest Long were also on the New Lois faculty. Before WWII, St.Elmo Lee taught agriculture at both New Lois School and at Ray City School. Gerald Huff coached the boys basketball team in 1952.

Other students attending the school included Edna Bennett, Myrtice Jordan, Hazel Ray, Hazel Fletcher, Alma Luke, Lucille Knowle.  In the 1930s, Latrelle Shaw, Lawana Shaw and Otis Shaw attended the New Lois School, walking the four mile distance from their parents’ home near Ray City both ways, daily. Reva Rice and Hubert Comer were students in 1936-37.

Arlo Snead Taught at New Lois School

Arlo Futch Snead (1910-1987)

Arlo Futch Snead taught at the New Lois School, near Ray City, GA in the 1930s. She was the wife of Henry Snead and sister-in-law of Maxie Snead Patten.

Henry Snead and Arlo Futch Snead

Henry Snead and Arlo Futch Snead, mid 1940s. The partial image of a child is their son, known as Hank. Photo courtesy of Reba Patten Mason and Linda Meadows Ward.

Kansas Arlo Futch was born January 7, 1910 in Nashville, GA, a daughter of Victor Hugo Futch and Effie Luke. For more than 40 years she taught school in Berrien County GA.  In the 1930s, she was on the faculty at New Lois School, along with her sister-in-law Maxie Snead Patten. Bernys Peters and Grace Swindle, of Ray City, GA were also on the New Lois faculty.

New Lois consolidated school junior high faculty 1936-37. Left to right Arlo Futch Snead, Gladys Gaskins, Grace Swindle, Bernys W. Peters, Earl Weaver, Lella Forrest Long, Maxie Snead Patten.

New Lois consolidated school junior high faculty 1936-37. Left to right Arlo Futch Snead, Gladys Gaskins, Grace Swindle, Bernys W. Peters, Earl Weaver, Lella Forrest Long, Maxie Snead Patten.

 

Mrs. Arlo Snead with her 3rd grade class, 1956-57.

Mrs. Arlo Snead with her 3rd grade class, 1956-57.

 

1969-70 Mrs. Arlo Snead's Class

1970 Mrs. Arlo Snead’s Class, Nashville Elementary School. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

 

Obituary of Arlo Futch Snead. Courtesy of Bill Outlaw.

Obituary of Arlo Futch Snead. Courtesy of Bill Outlaw.

Mrs. Arlo Futch Snead

Mrs. Arlo Futch Snead, 77, died Monday Aug. 10, 1987 at Tift Healthcare Center in Tifton after a length illness.
Born in Berrien County January 7, 1910, she was the daughter of the late Victor and Effie Luke Futch.
Mrs. Snead was a memberof the Nashville First Baptist Church. She was a retired school teacher with the Berrien County School system having taught for 42 years.
She is survived by a daughter-in-law, Mrs. Gayle Norton Snead, one Granddaughter, Melinda; and one grandson, Bret, all of Alapaha; tow sisters, Mrs.Rebecca Dill of Tifton, and Mrs. Jean Watkins of Montgomery, Ala. She was preceded in death by her husband, Henry, Feb. 2, 1983 and a son Hank, May 1987.
Graveside services were held Wednesday, Aug. 12, at 11 a.m. with interment in Westview Cemetery. The Rev. Fred Hesters and the Rev. Billy Southerland officiated.
Active pallbearers were J. P. Webb, Raymond Guest, Thomas Futch, C. W. Anderson, Bill Mathis and Larry Taylor.
Lovein Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements.

Family of Maxie Snead Patten

Maxie Snead Patten (1912-1992)

Maxie Snead Patten was a well known athlete, teacher, coach, youth leader and author of Berrien County, GA.  On September 3, 1950 Maxie Snead Patten addressed the youth of the Ray City community at the Ray City Baptist Church.

Maxie Snead, 1929 school photo. Image detail courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

Maxie Snead, 1929 school photo. Image detail courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

Family of Maxie Snead Patten <br>Front row: Maxie Snead Patten holding Reba (her daughter), Laura Youmans Snead (holding baby), William M. “Bill” Snead, little boys are David Lovett and Jimmy Lovett, Inez Snead Lovett, holding granddaughter, Jan Lovett. <br>2nd Row L-R: Henry Snead, Billy Snead, Annette Snead Ensley (Billy and Annette’s father was Walter Snead, one of the 8 Snead siblings, who died in his late twenties, when his children were young.), Myrt Snead Willis, Willie Mae “Bill” Sapp, Eugene Lovett (Inez’s husband). <br>3rd Row L-R: Dorothy Snead (wife of Felton “Crip Snead), Tom Skinner, Mary Lovett Skinner. <br>4th Row L-R: Arlo Snead (wife of Henry Snead), Martha “Boots” Lovett Paulk, Martha Jim Lovett (wife of James Lovett). <br>Back Row L-R: Grover Patten (husband of Maxie), Colonel Dewitt Sapp, Felton “Crip” Snead, James Lovett <br>Man behind Mary Lovett Skinner with face partially hidden is unknown. <br> One other Snead sibling, Nettie, died in her twenties, not shown. <br>Courtesy of Reba Patten Mason and Linda Ward Meadows.

Family of Maxie Snead Patten
Front row: Maxie Snead Patten holding Reba (her daughter), Laura Youmans Snead (holding baby), William M. “Bill” Snead, little boys are David Lovett and Jimmy Lovett, Inez Snead Lovett, holding granddaughter, Jan Lovett.
2nd Row L-R: Henry Snead, Billy Snead, Annette Snead Ensley (Billy and Annette’s father was Walter Snead, one of the 8 Snead siblings, who died in his late twenties, when his children were young.), Myrt Snead Willis, Willie Mae “Bill” Sapp, Eugene Lovett (Inez’s husband).
3rd Row L-R: Dorothy Snead (wife of Felton “Crip” Snead), Tom Skinner, Mary Lovett Skinner.
4th Row L-R: Arlo Snead (wife of Henry Snead), Martha “Boots” Lovett Paulk, Martha Jim Lovett (wife of James Lovett).
Back Row L-R: Grover Patten (husband of Maxie), Colonel Dewitt Sapp, Felton “Crip” Snead, James Lovett
Man behind Mary Lovett Skinner with face partially hidden is unknown.
One other Snead sibling, Nettie, died in her twenties, not shown.
Courtesy of Reba Patten Mason and Linda Ward Meadows.

Maxie Snead played on the “Nashville Wonder Six” Southeast Georgia Championship teams of 1927,  1928, and 1929. Among her team mates was Ida Lou Giddens, daughter of Ray City barber and mayor Lyman Franklin Giddens.

Maxie Snead played on the 1929 Nashville Public School girls basketball team, nicknamed the “Nashville Wonder Six”. For the three seasons 1927, 1928, 1929, the team record was 70 wins against only 4 losses. In 1927 they went 20-0 and won the Southeast Georgia Championship, also winning the Southeast Georgia Championship in 1928 and 1929. Seated left to right: Ida Lou Giddens Fletcher, Nell Powell McCloud, Silvia Bonnett, Evelyn Carter Wilkes. Standing: Maxie Snead Patten, Bill Griffin Register, and Coach Willie Chisholm. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

Maxie Snead played on the 1929 Nashville Public School girls basketball team, nicknamed the “Nashville Wonder Six.” For the three seasons 1927, 1928, 1929, the team record was 70 wins against only 4 losses. In 1927 they went 20-0 and won the Southeast Georgia Championship, also winning the Southeast Georgia Championship in 1928 and 1929. Seated left to right: Ida Lou Giddens Fletcher, Nell Powell McCloud, Silvia Bonnett, Evelyn Carter Wilkes. Standing: Maxie Snead Patten, Bill Griffin Register, and Coach Willie Chisholm. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

In the 1930s Maxie Snead Patten coached the girls basketball teams at New Lois School to the Berrien County Championship. Team member Alma Luke later attended the Ray City School.

New Lois Girls Basketball, Champions 1937-1938 Mrs. Patten, Edna Bennett, Myrtice Jordan, Hazel Ray, Hazel Fletcher, Alma Luke, Lucille Knowles. Photo courtesy of Faye Jernigan and www.berriencountyga.com

1937-38 New Lois Girls Basketball Team, Berrien County Champions 
Mrs. Maxie Snead Patten, Edna Bennett, Myrtice Jordan, Hazel Ray, Hazel Fletcher, Alma Luke, Lucille Knowles. Photo courtesy of Faye Jernigan and http://www.berriencountyga.com

 

 

 

Preacher Shaw and Susie Ray

Preacher Shaw and Susie Ray

Preacher Shaw, circa 1926. Image courtesy of Bryan Shaw.

Preacher Shaw, circa 1926. Image courtesy of Bryan Shaw.

Preacher Shaw was a son of Ray City, Georgia. He was a popular baseball player, sometimes politician, and salesman of Berrien County. His given name was Fondren Willie Mitchell Shaw, but at a young age he acquired the nickname “Preacher,” a moniker that stuck for life. As a boy, Preacher Shaw attended Pine Grove School and the Kings Chapel School, located just across the county line, in Lowndes County. His parents, Jesse Shelby “Dock” Shaw and Susie Bullard, had attended the same school in their youth.

From Bryan Shaw’s family newsletter comes the following:

 It was at the Kings Chapel school that Preacher Shaw met his life-long companion, Susie Ray, daughter of Charles M. Ray and Maggie Hutto Ray. She had finished her educational training by attending Georgia State Womans College [now Valdosta State University], and had been teaching at Pleasant Vale and Indian Camp  schools. She had just started teaching at Kings Chapel when she met young Preacher Shaw.  It is not clear if he was finishing his formal education of if he was attending a function there and made her acquaintance.

The only automobile that the couple had to court in was the rumble-seat coupe that belonged to Susie. But it was adequate and they were mar- ried on November 13, 1927 in the home of Susie’s parents by Elder Aaron Knight. The couple set up house for a brief time with Susie’s parents, where their first child, Latrelle was born July 14,1928. They shortly thereafter moved into the Martha Carter place just off of the Old Valdosta Highway near Barker Road. Here their second child Lawanna was born March 26, 1930. During this time, Preacher was farming the property of Susie’s parents. The family then moved into a small home on Indian Camp Road about a mile west of the Ray homeplace. It had been the old White Pond Church, which had been moved to the Ray property by Preacher and Susie’s brothers, Henry and Buck. By November the following year 1931, Preacher and Susie had moved over to the “Dock” Shaw place, helping on that farm. They lived in the log house that Preacher had been born in 25 years earlier. Their third child, a son Otis was born on November 16, 1931. Early the following year in 1932, Preacher suddenly suffered an attack of appendicitis, and was rushed to the Little Griffin Hospital in Valdosta. His recovery was slow, and Susie stayed at the home of Preacher’s sister, Cora Shaw Griffin. Susie visited Preacher daily while walking to the hospital and back carrying baby Otis.

Preacher worked the Ray property until about 1937, when he went down to Jacksonville, Florida to work for his brother-in-law, Lewis Ennis, Mary Idell’s husband. Lewis owned and  operated a service station and oil company in Avondale, Florida. Preacher would drive back and forth from Jacksonville to Ray City about once a month, while Susie worked the family farm. The children were attending the New Lois School about this time, walking the four mile distance each way, daily. One of their fondest childhood moments was when Preacher brought home a used girl’s bicycle from Jacksonville. With the birth of their fourth and last child, Gerald on April 5, 1938, Preacher found employment a little closer to home, working on a construction crew, building roads near Thomasville. However this opportunity turned into tragedy, when one of the construction tractors turned over on top of him. He was hospitalized in critical condition for sometime before finally recovering. He carried scars from that accident the rest of his life. All during the months and years that Preacher was working out of town, Susie was home, raising the children and working the farm. She was also an accomplished seamstress, sewing all of the children’s clothes. She was often sought after for seamstress work by many of her neighbors and her work was well known throughout the county. When Preacher recovered from the accident, he returned to work the farm, and the family moved in and lived with Susie’s widowed mother. About 1940 Mrs. Ray deeded the Ray homeplace and 100 acres of the farm in the 134th land lot to Susie.  Maggie Ray died August 2, 1942.

About 1945, Preacher went to work in Nashville for Jake Rutherford in the fertilizer business. This began a long venture in the feed, seed, and fertilizer business that lasted over two decades. He worked at the Leah Stallings Feed and Seed, Perkins Warehouse, and John David Luke at the Nashville Mills. He was a “drummer”, a natural-born salesman, selling seed and fertilizer, then traveling through out Berrien and the surrounding counties, buying back the farmers’ crops. Then he would sell them seed for the next crop year.

Reprint courtesy of Bryan Shaw.

Ag Teachers go to War

St. Elmo Lee, 1939

St. Elmo Lee, 1939, served with the 902nd Artillery at Leyte, WWII

On October 24, 1942 vocational agriculture teacher St. Elmo Lee gave up his classrooms at Ray City  and New Lois, GA for the U.S. Army.  He was inducted at Fort McPherson, Atlanta, GA for the duration of the war. He was single, 5′ 9″ tall and weighed 134 pounds.

St. Elmo Lee enlisted as a private, eventually serving as a sergeant in Battery C, 902nd Field Artillery Battalion 77th Division.  He fought in the Pacific Theater of Operations from March 30, 1944 to November 22, 1945 during which time he was involved in amphibious assaults and  campaigns on the Marshall Islands, Southern Philippines, and Ryukyu Islands.

U.S. howitzer fires on Catmon Hill, Leyte, Phillipines. October 20, 1944.

U.S. howitzer fires on Catmon Hill, Leyte, Philippines. October 20, 1944.
St. Elmo Lee, of Ray City, GA participated in the Battle of Leyte with the 902nd Field Artillery Battalion. In November 1944 the 902nd provided artillery support for the 77th Division operations in the Battle of Leyte.

In November 1944 the 902nd Field Artillery Battalion provided support for the 77th Division operations in the Battle of Leyte. In April 1945 the 902nd was with the 77th Division in the first attack on the Ryukyu Islands, seizing the islands west of Okinawa, and later moving to Okinawa itself.

St. Elmo Lee continued to serve until the end of the war.  He was returned to Fort McPherson, GA for his discharge on January 1, 1946.

Among the decorations he received were:

  • Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal with 3 Bronze Stars and One Bronze Arrowhead
  • Philippine Liberation Medal with one Bronze star
  • Good Conduct Medal
  • American Campaign Medal
  • World War Two Victory Medal

After the war, a pamphlet was published to honor the contributions of Georgia’s agriculture teachers, A Memorial to Georgia Teachers of Vocational Agriculture who fought, suffered, died and worked to win the war.

Among the area agriculture teachers who served were: St. Elmo Lee, of Ray City and New Lois schools,  J. V. Wynn from Nashville and Poplar Springs schools; W. C. Thigpen, Jr. of Barney; W.E. Rooks and Hal Godwin, of Homerville; K. N. Phillips from Ocilla; and J. I. Musselwhite, of Willacoochee; R. E. King, Jr., of Clyattville and Lake Park; John Hensley of Hahira;  H. C. Dorminey from Tifton; and Tom M. Cordell, of Abraham Baldwin.

1946 war memorial to Georgia teachers of vocational agriculture.

1946 war memorial to Georgia teachers of vocational agriculture.

 ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-SEVEN TEACHERS ENTERED THE SERVICE

One hundred and fifty-seven teachers of vocational agriculture left their classrooms and entered the Armed Service between 1941 and 1945. More than two-thirds of these served in the army, about one-fourth in the navy, and the rest in the Marines.  

These teachers scattered to the four corners of the earth. To the damp humid jungles, to the freezing temperature of the Aleutians, to the barren sand-swept deserts, they went to do their bit for Uncle Sam. But no matter how far away from home, their thoughts stayed in Georgia.

Seven of these men made the supreme sacrifice. Some of the men were injured; they came back maimed for life, wearers of the Purple Heart. Some were captured and suffered the horrors known only to “prisoners of war.” Many were decorated for courageous actions. All made courageous contributions to winning the war.

The accumulated stories of these teachers would probably fill a book. Some were baptized in fire with American forces that swept across France and into Germany itself. Others fought from the decks of ships or cheated death in flaming battles of the skies. Still others who may have wanted to get in the active fighting were assigned to shore stations in this country or abroad.

But all of the men have stories to tell-if they wanted to talk. It is highly probable that the experience of the men give them a more international point of view. They have seen enough to convince them that this is now in reality one world. And they have had an opportunity to see where Georgia and her agriculture fit into the scheme of things.

Today, some of the teachers are returning to the classrooms they left behind; some are teachers of vocational agriculture in new fields; others are instructors in the newly developed Veterans Farmer Training Program.

Georgia is glad to welcome back her sons. They have done a good job where they were and there is still a job for them to do here. It is good to see the official family of vocational agriculture getting back together again.

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St. Elmo Lee Was a Blessing to FFA

In the summer of 1940, St. Elmo Lee arrived in Ray City, GA.  That fall he began his teaching career as the Vocational Agriculture teacher at Ray City School.

St. Elmo Lee, 1940, Senior Photo, University of Georgia.

St. Elmo Lee, 1940, Senior Photo, University of Georgia.

The Nashville Herald
August 8, 1940,  front page

New Agriculture Teacher For New Lois and Ray City

      S.E. Lee of Cairo arrived in Berrien county this week to assume his duties as agriculture instructor in the Ray City and New Lois schools for this year.
      Mr. Lee is a graduate of the University of Georgia the past June, and comes highly recommended for the work he is to do.  He is making his home in Ray City.
      J.G. Tatum handled the Ray City agriculture classes last year, while E.R. Fowler had the New Lois classes.

Transcription courtesy of Skeeter Parker

In the summer of 1940 St. Elmo Lee was a young man of 22, a fresh graduate of the University of  Georgia. He was a son of John Henry Lee and Willie Myrtice Rehberg, born in the midst of World War I on March 17, 1918. A product of Grady County, Georgia, he had attended Reno Grammar school, and graduated Cairo High School with the class of 1936. Afterward he attended South Georgia College before transfering to the University of Georgia.

At UGA he studied agricultural education, and was Secretary of Gaffau.

The name of Gaffau Club comes from the initials of Georgia Future Farmers of America, University Chapter, a national organization. Its purpose is to promote guidance as a basis of choice for vocational teaching, and to provide recreation and fraternal relationships for students preparing to teach vocational agriculture and to perform duties of advisors of high school F. F. A. chapters. Any student who is regularly enrolled in agricultural courses at the University of Georgia and who has been a member of a local Future Farmers of America chapter or is specializing in teacher training in the Division of Vocational Education is eligible to active membership.

World War II intervened in Mr. Lee’s tenure at the Ray City School.   On October 24, 1942 St. Elmo Lee gave up the classroom for enlistment.  Mr. Lee served his country for three years as a Sergeant in the United States Army, 77th Division.

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Maxie Snead Patten, Youth Leader

Sixty-two years ago on this date, August 31, Ray City Baptist Church heard from guest speaker Maxie Snead Patten, a well known youth leader, author, teacher and coach.

Maxie Snead Patten 1937-38. Image detail courtesy of berriencountyga.com.

Maxie Snead Patten 1937-38. Image detail courtesy of berriencountyga.com.


The Nashville Herald
August 31, 1950, Page 1

Mrs. Patten to Speak at Ray City Church Sunday P.M.

Mrs. Maxie Snead Patten will speak Sunday evening at 8 p.m. at Ray City Baptist Church, it was announced today.

The well known South Georgia young people’s leader will speak primarily to the youth of the community, filling the pulpit of the Rev. John W. Harrell.

A large attendance is being urged.

Transcription courtesy of Skeeter Parker.

Maxie Snead Patten was a daughter of Laura Youmans and William McIntyre “Bill” Snead, of Nashville, GA. Her father was a large land owner.

Maxie Snead attended Nashville High School where she played on the girls basketball team.

Christmas Eve Wedding

In 1933, Maxie Snead married Grover Patten in a Christmas Eve ceremony performed by Reverend John W. Harrell.

Later she taught in area schools and coached girls basketball. In 1937-38 she coached the New Lois girls team to the Berrien County championship.

In the 1940s Maxie Snead Patten authored a book, Youth, the Miracle Age, and was known as a youth leader.

Children of Maxie Patten

Children of Maxie Patten.
L-R, are Reba Patten, Patti Patten, and Kaye Patten. The photo was taken in late 1940s, at the Grover Patten home in Nashville, GA, next door to Bill and Laura Youmans Snead, grandparents of the Patten children. (Identifications courtesy of Linda Ward Meadows).

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