Arlo Snead Taught at New Lois School

Arlo Futch Snead (1910-1987)

Arlo Futch Snead taught at the New Lois School, near Ray City, GA in the 1930s. She was the wife of Henry Snead and sister-in-law of Maxie Snead Patten.

Henry Snead and Arlo Futch Snead

Henry Snead and Arlo Futch Snead, mid 1940s. The partial image of a child is their son, known as Hank. Photo courtesy of Reba Patten Mason and Linda Meadows Ward.

Kansas Arlo Futch was born January 7, 1910 in Nashville, GA, a daughter of Victor Hugo Futch and Effie Luke. For more than 40 years she taught school in Berrien County GA.  In the 1930s, she was on the faculty at New Lois School, along with her sister-in-law Maxie Snead Patten. Bernys Peters and Grace Swindle, of Ray City, GA were also on the New Lois faculty.

New Lois consolidated school junior high faculty 1936-37. Left to right Arlo Futch Snead, Gladys Gaskins, Grace Swindle, Bernys W. Peters, Earl Weaver, Lella Forrest Long, Maxie Snead Patten.

New Lois consolidated school junior high faculty 1936-37. Left to right Arlo Futch Snead, Gladys Gaskins, Grace Swindle, Bernys W. Peters, Earl Weaver, Lella Forrest Long, Maxie Snead Patten.

 

Mrs. Arlo Snead with her 3rd grade class, 1956-57.

Mrs. Arlo Snead with her 3rd grade class, 1956-57.

 

1969-70 Mrs. Arlo Snead's Class

1970 Mrs. Arlo Snead’s Class, Nashville Elementary School. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

 

Obituary of Arlo Futch Snead. Courtesy of Bill Outlaw.

Obituary of Arlo Futch Snead. Courtesy of Bill Outlaw.

Mrs. Arlo Futch Snead

Mrs. Arlo Futch Snead, 77, died Monday Aug. 10, 1987 at Tift Healthcare Center in Tifton after a length illness.
Born in Berrien County January 7, 1910, she was the daughter of the late Victor and Effie Luke Futch.
Mrs. Snead was a memberof the Nashville First Baptist Church. She was a retired school teacher with the Berrien County School system having taught for 42 years.
She is survived by a daughter-in-law, Mrs. Gayle Norton Snead, one Granddaughter, Melinda; and one grandson, Bret, all of Alapaha; tow sisters, Mrs.Rebecca Dill of Tifton, and Mrs. Jean Watkins of Montgomery, Ala. She was preceded in death by her husband, Henry, Feb. 2, 1983 and a son Hank, May 1987.
Graveside services were held Wednesday, Aug. 12, at 11 a.m. with interment in Westview Cemetery. The Rev. Fred Hesters and the Rev. Billy Southerland officiated.
Active pallbearers were J. P. Webb, Raymond Guest, Thomas Futch, C. W. Anderson, Bill Mathis and Larry Taylor.
Lovein Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements.

Ray City Girls and Boys at Camp Wilkins

Ray City School students were among the girls and boys who attended 1931 summer courses at Camp Wilkins in Athens, GA. Camp Wilkins was built in 1924 as the first state 4-H camp in the nation.

According to the New Georgia Encyclopedia,

 “The roots of the Georgia 4-H Club began in 1904 in Newton County as a countywide boys’ corn club. Statewide corn- and cotton-growing contests were held in 1906. Chicken and pig contests were held in 1908. In that same year the program was also extended to black youngsters. Club work for girls began in Hancock County in 1906 and consisted of garden clubs, tomato clubs, and canning clubs. By 1911 more than 1,500 girls were active in the pre-4-H Club activities.  In 1924 the nation’s first state 4-H camp, Camp Wilkins, was built on the University of Georgia campus.”
1925-camp-wilkins

Cooking breakfast at Camp Wilkins, a part of Georgia State College of Agriculture, after a nature hike. Circa 1925-1932. Image source: Vanishing Georgia, Georgia Division of Archives and History, Office of Secretary of State.

 In  the summer of 1931 a number of local Ray City youth and adults attended Camp Wilkins, the first 4-H camp in Georgia.  Camp Wilkins offered  summer course programs June 14 through August 13 through the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanical Arts in Athens, GA, at the University of Georgia.

“BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ SHORT COURSES AT CAMP WILKINS

A short course of nine weeks is given every summer for the boys and girls who have won scholarships in the different agricultural and home economics clubs of the state. This course is also open to boys and girls who do not win scholarships.

Scholarships in the short courses are given by fair associations, chambers of commerce, women’s clubs, banks, and other public-spirited organizations and individuals who are interested in stimulating education in agriculture and home economics among boys and girls.

Every year more than 2,000 boys and girls take advantage of the elementary instruction which is made very practical indeed and is visualized as far as possible by application and illustration.”

Among the boys attending from Ray City were Bernard Johnson (RCHS 1930), Brown King (RCHS 1930),  Leland Langford  (RCHS, 1939),  J. D. Luke, Billy McDonald,  James Swindle  (RCHS, 1936). The girls were Clyde Carter (RCHS 1936), Margaret Carter  (RCHS 1930), Mabel McDonald (RCHS 1930), Clyde Moore, Doris Swindle  (RCHS 1930), and Grace Swindle, and Beth Terry (RCHS 1930).  Ray City adults Chloe Gardener Johnson   and Carrie McDonald were also at Camp Wilkins, attending a summer course for farm women.   The 4-H activities in Berrien County were coordinated by County Agricultural Agent Donald L. Branyon, and the Home Demonstration Agent was Mary Nell Davis.  In Georgia, there were also Negro Boys’ clubs, Negro Home Demonstration Clubs, Negro Agricultural Agents and Negro Home Demonstration Agents, but none serving Berrien County.  The black division of 4-H was headquartered at Savannah State College (now Savannah State University), and separate events were held for its members in Dublin, GA.
Announcement of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanical Arts for the session 1932-1933 with Register of Officers and Students for the Session 1931-1932, Athens, Georgia

Announcement of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanical Arts for the session 1932-1933 with Register of Officers and Students for the Session 1931-1932, Athens, Georgia

Camp Wilkins, Athens, GA

Camp Wilkins, Athens, GA, 1925

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Camp Wilkins

Club girls at Camp Wilkins studying home foundation plantings and shrubbery, 1925.  The building is Barrow Hall on the UGA campus.

Horticulture class at Camp Wilkins, Athens, GA

Horticulture class at Camp Wilkins, Athens, GA, 1925

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Athens, June 17-22, 1929. Farm women's camp, Georgia home demonstration council.

Athens, June 17-22, 1929. Farm women’s camp, Georgia home demonstration council.

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Ray City’s Women of G.S.W.C

Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA

Georgia State Womans College, 1925. (Now known as Valdosta State University)

Georgia State Womans College, 1925. (Now known as Valdosta State University)

From 1922 to 1950 the state college in Valdosta, Georgia now known as Valdosta State University operated as a four year college under the name Georgia State Womans College.  A number of Ray City women attended the college during this period. Here are a few who appeared in available yearbooks:

Dorothy Boyette

Dorothy Boyette, of Ray City, GA. Attended Georgia State Womans College in 1944.

Dorothy Boyette, of Ray City, GA. Attended Georgia State Womans College in 1944.

Margaret Carter, a the daughter of Cora and Yancy F. Carter, attended G.S.C.W in 1935:

1935 Margaret Carter, sophomore, Georgia State Womans College

1935 Margaret Carter of Ray City, GA, sophomore, Georgia State Womans College

Frances Clements, daughter of Hod P. Clements of Ray City, GA excelled at technical studies.  After completing high school at  the Ray City School she went on to enroll at Georgia State Womans College in 1943:

Frances Clements, of Ray City, GA. A 1944 sophomore at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA.

Frances Clements, of Ray City, GA. A 1944 sophomore at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA.

Annie Ruth Clements  was born at Ray City, GA about 1924, a daughter of Mary Elizabeth Lee and  William A. Clements. Her father was a farmer and butcher at Ray City. She enrolled at Georgia State Womans College in 1943:

Ann Ruth Clements of Ray City, GA, a 1943 freshman at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA (now Valdosta State University.)

Ann Ruth Clements of Ray City, GA, a 1943 freshman at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA (now Valdosta State University.)

Geraldine Fletcher Giddens, born Geraldine Hester Fletcher on February 2, 1924, was a daughter of Eliza Carter and Zachariah Fletcher. She  married Norvell “Joe” Giddens, and made her home at Ray City, GA while attending G.S.W.C.:

Geraldine Fletcher Giddens was a resident of Ray City, GA while attending Georgia State Women's College during the 1940s.

Geraldine Fletcher Giddens, 1943 freshman class photo, Georgia State Womens College. She was a resident of Ray City, GA while attending G.S.W.C. during the 1940s.

Mary Luelle Giddens was born at Ray City,  GA on November 22, 1915, one of thirteen children born to Eugene Madison Giddens and Georgia Ida Rigell. She attended G.S.W.C. in the 1930s:

Louelle Giddens, 1934 student of Georgia State Womans College.

Luelle Giddens, 1934 student of Georgia State Womans College.

Thera Ollis Hambrick attended  G.S.W.C. in the 1930s and later served as librarian at the school. She wrote  Valdosta State College: The First Half Century:

Thera Hambrick, of Ray City, GA, 1935 freshman at Georgia State Womans College.

Thera Hambrick, of Ray City, GA, 1935 freshman at Georgia State Womans College.

Mary Lee, a daughter of  William D. “Bill” Lee and Mollie Bell Clements,  was born February 6, 1915 in Berrien County, GA:

Mary Lee of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College (nka Valdosta State University)

Mary Lee of Ray City, GA at Georgia State Womans College (nka Valdosta State University), 1933

Mollie Idelle Lee was born Feb 28, 1919 near Ray City, GA  in  that part of Berrien County that was cut into Lanier County in 1920.   She was the youngest child of Mollie Clements and William David Lee.

Mollie Idelle Lee, 1937. Freshman at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA.

Mollie Idelle Lee, 1937. Freshman at Georgia State Womans College, Valdosta, GA.

Judy Moore attended G.S.W.C. while a resident of Ray City, GA in the 1950s.

Judy Moore, of Ray City, GA, 1950 freshman at Georgia State Womans College.

Judy Moore, of Ray City, GA, 1950 sophomore at Georgia State Womans College.

Elsie Quarterman  attended Georgia State Womans College in Valdosta, GA (now known as Valdosta State University.) The 1931 Pine Cone, the college annual, gives her home town as Ray City, GA.  Elsie graduated from G.S.W.C. in 1932 with a Bachelor of Arts degree and went on to become a noted ecologist:

Elsie Quarterman, 1931.

Elsie Quarterman, 1931.

Doris E. Swindle was born and raised in Ray City, GA.  She was a daughter of  Sarah Ellen  “Stell” Daniel and James Henry Swindle. Her father was a farmer and merchant of Ray City, and served in the Georgia House of Representatives in the 1930s. She died in an automobile accident in 1941.

1934 Doris Swindle, Georgia State Womans College

1934 Doris Swindle, Georgia State Womans College

Grace Swindle was the youngest daughter of  Sarah Ellen  “Stell” Daniel and James Henry Swindle, and sister of Doris Swindle and James Aaron Swindle.

Grace Swindle, Freshman, Georgia State Womans College.

Grace Swindle, Freshman, Georgia State Womans College.

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