Lucious Norman Gillham

Lucious Norman Gillham was a veteran of World War II and came to Ray City, GA with his wife after the war. He was born in Jackson County, GA on January 5, 1908, a son of George Washington Gillham and Estelle Mae Gillham.

Lucious N. Gillham enlisted April 24, 1943 at Ft. McPherson, Atlanta, GA.  At the time of enlistment he was living in Fulton County, GA, and was employed as a textile mill worker.  His father and older siblings had all been mill workers at the Porterdale Mill at Newton County, GA since before 1920s.  Lucious was only educated through the 5th grade, after which he left school to take up work. After the death of his father in 1925, Lucious went to work at a textile mill in Varennes, SC but by 1935 he was back at the Porterdale Mill working as a doffer.

Porterdale Mill belonged to the Bibb Manufacturing Company,  one of the largest employers in the state.  “The City of Porterdale is located 35 miles east of Atlanta on the Yellow River in Newton County, Georgia.  In 1899 the Bibb Manufacturing Company built a twine mill on the river and named it Porterdale Mill after a founder of the community, Oliver Porter.  The community of mill homes attracted workers looking for jobs and a better life.”

Porterdale Mill, Georgia

Porterdale Mill, Georgia

People came from all over the state to work in the Porterdale mill.  Among the many workers enumerated at Porterdale in the 1940 census  were Pasco Olandro Hall, of Ray City, GA; Tom Sirmans Jones, of Nashville, GA;  Grady Bloodworth, from the upper 10th District of Berrien County; Jesse Franklin Bennett of Adel, GA; Lois, Jessie Mae, James and Elmer Black, four teenage siblings from Lowndes County, GA.  One wonders if Lucious Gillham and the mill workers from South Georgia knew each other, and if their association later influenced Lucious to come to Ray City. At any rate, Lucious  and Jeanette Gillham moved about 1947 to Ray City,  where for 18 years they worked a farm on Route 1.

Lucious Gillham died on May 28, 1965 and was buried at Pleasant Cemetery, near Ray City, GA.  His obituary appeared in the Nashville Herald.

 

Obituary of Lucious Norman Gillham, of Ray City, GA

Obituary of Lucious Norman Gillham, of Ray City, GA

Nashville Herald
June 3, 1965

Lucious Gillham Dies On Friday Morning

        Lucious N. Gillham, who made his home on Route One, Ray City, and was for the past eighteen years a resident of that area, succumbed to a lengthy illness early Friday morning, May 28. Mr. Gillham was confined to Berrien County Hospital at the time of his passing.
        Born on January 5, 1908, the deceased was 57 years of age.  A native Georgian, he was the son of the late George W. and Stella Mae Lowrey Gillham. He was married on December 31, 1935 to the former Miss Jeanette Dorsey, by whom he is survived. Mr. Gillham saw service in the United States Army during World War II, and before declining health curtailed his activity he was a farmer.
        Funeral services were conducted from the Pleasant Primitive Baptist Church at 2 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, May 30, with Elder Howard Weaver officiating. In accordance with Primitive Baptist doctrine, an unaccompanied choir sang three time-honored hymns of consolation, Amazing Grace, Rock of Ages, and In the Sweet Bye and Bye. Laid to rest in the churchyard cemetery, Mr. Gillham was accompanied to his place of last repose by a cortege of military men from nearby Moody Air Force Base.
        Besides his widow, Mr. Gillham leaves three sisters, Mrs. Doris Dix, of Griffin, and Mrs. Mildred West and Mrs. Beatrice Goode, both of Douglasville. There are also a number of nices and nephews.
       All details were completed under the direction of Lovein Funeral Home.

 

 

Grave of Lucious N. Gillham and Jeanette Dorsey Gillham, Pleasant Cemetery near Ray City, GA

Grave of Lucious N. Gillham and Jeanette Dorsey Gillham, Pleasant Cemetery near Ray City, GA

Pasco Olandro Hall and the Porterdale Mill

Pasco Olandro

Pasco Olandro “Pad” Hall

Pasco Olandro “Pad” Hall was born June 30, 1890 in Rays Mill (nka Ray City), GA.    He was the adopted son of Cassie Lee Hall (1857-1944)  and John Lewis Hall (1858-1918). Pad grew up in Ray City, GA.

Family members say as a young man, “He had blue eyes, brown hair was dark complexion 5 feet 8 inches tall weighed approx 170 lbs.” His occupation was Blacksmith.

During World War I Pasco Hall was enlisted as a private in the Army.  He was inducted at Nashville, GA on November 8, 1918.  His service record shows he was with Battery D, 26th Artillery, Coastal Artillery Corps, Fort Screven, GA, until discharged. Fortunately the Armistice on 11 November 1918, ended the war in victory for the Allies and Pad never saw duty overseas. He received an Honorable Discharge on December 6, 1918 at Fort Screven GA.

Pasco Olandro Hall, WWI Service Record

Pasco Olandro Hall, WWI Service Record

After the war, Pad Hall moved to Porterdale, GA and went to work at the Porterdale Mill of the Bibb Manufacturing Company.  Bibb was one of the largest employers in the state.

Porterdale Mill on the Yellow River, GA

Porterdale Mill on the Yellow River, GA

By the time of the 1920 Census Pasco Olandro Hall was married to Ruby Kirkus, He was 27, Ruby was 17.  The couple were living in the Cedar Shoal district, Newton Co., GA. in the household of Leila Kirkus.

Pasco Olandro Hall died October 22, 1942 in Porterdale, Newton County, GA.  He was buried in the Hall Family Cemetery in Newton County, GA.

Grave of Pasco Olandro Hall

Grave of Pasco Olandro Hall

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Lawrence Cauley Hall

Lawrence Cauley Hall, born 20 Feb 1884, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia.  Cauley was a son of Cassie Lee and John Lewis Hall, and a brother of  Pasco Olandro Hall.  He grew up in his parents’ household at Rays Mill (now Ray City), GA.

Lawrence Cauley Hall, of Ray City, GA. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

Lawrence Cauley Hall, of Ray City, GA. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

Cauley Hall completed the common schools of the area, and went on for more advanced studies. Family historian Mrs. Cyleta Austin said “he was a genius, attended Mercer but let the drinking get to him.”   He gave up his college studies after the first year.

On December 1, 1908 Cauley Hall married Eula Bell Swindle.   The ceremony was performed by Elder Aaron Anderson Knight.  Eula was a daughter of  Mary Etta and Redding D. Swindle, and sister of  Henry Alexander Swindle, of Ray City, GA. Her father was appointed to serve as the first mayor of Ray City upon its official incorporation in 1909. Her mother is credited with naming the new town, formerly known as Ray’s Mill.

1908 Marriage license of Lawrence Cauley Hall and Eula Bell Swindle

1908 Marriage license of Lawrence Cauley Hall and Eula Bell Swindle

Eula gave birth to a baby girl on June 9, 1909, Eunice A. Hall, in Ray City, GA.   It appears that Eula and the baby returned to live with her parents. She was enumerated in their Ray City household in 1910 under her maiden name. Her marital status was “single,” and Eunice Hall was enumerated as a grandchild of Redding Swindle. Cauley’s whereabouts in the census of 1910 are not known.

However, by 1918 Cauley and Eula were making their home at a company lumber camp at 4 Northport, Tuscaloosa County, AL.  Lawrence was working for the Henderson Land & Lumber Company as a skidder foreman. There, he registered for the draft for World War I on September 12, 1918.  His physical description was given as medium height, medium build, with blue eyes and grey hair.

The 1920 census shows the couple now with two daughters, Eunice and Helen Jeanette, living on 13th Avenue, Tuscaloosa, AL.  Cauley was working as a laborer at a logging camp, while Eula was at home raising the girls.

It appears that by the time of the 1930 census Cauley Hall was estranged from his wife, Eula B. Swindle. The census record show that year he remained in Tuscaloosa, AL, living in Young’s boarding home on 6th Street, operated by Nannie and Robert J. Young.  He was working as a carpenter, and gave his marital status as “divorced.”  Eula Bell had returned to Ray City,GA with her younger daughter Hazel Jeanette Hall, now 12. Eula rented a house (probably on Jones Street) near the homes of James Blanton, Pleamon Sirmans and Hod Clements, and took work as a seamstress. The 1930 census indicated her marital status was “widowed.

By 1940 Cauley Hall  had also returned to Ray City, GA where he was living with his now married daughter, Hazel, and her husband, Reid Hearn Cox.  Cox, a salesman of music supplies,  originated from Eatonton, GA. The Coxes were in a new home they had built on the northeast corner of North Street and Jones Street in Ray City.

Home of Reid Hearn Cox and Hazel Hall Cox, Jones Street, Ray City, GA. The Coxes had this home built prior to 1940. Hazel's father, Lawrence Cauley Hall, resided with the Coxes in the 1940s.

Home of Reid Hearn Cox and Hazel Hall Cox, Jones Street, Ray City, GA. The Coxes had this home built prior to 1940. Hazel’s father, Lawrence Cauley Hall, resided with the Coxes in the 1940s.

 

Eula Bell Hall was living with her widowed grandmother, Mary Etta Swindle, in her home on North Street in Ray City.

Lawrence Cauley Hall died  on Christmas Day,  December 25, 1954,  in Ray City, Georgia.  He was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery.

Eula Bell Hall died January 28, 1965. Historian Cyleta Austin said she was in an automobile accident with Eula; Eula “died at home about two weeks later but not as a cause of the wreck.”   Eula was buried next to her husband at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Graves of Eula Bell Swindle and Lawrence Cauley Hall

Graves of Eula Bell Swindle and Lawrence Cauley Hall

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