Joseph Burton Calhoun ~ WWI Soldier

Joseph Burton Calhoun, 1918, in WWI army uniform, probably taken in Atlanta, GA. Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun.

Joseph Burton Calhoun, 1918, in WWI army uniform, probably taken in Atlanta, GA. Image courtesy of I. Mitchell Calhoun.

Joseph Burton Calhoun was a son of  Samuel Augustus “Gus” Calhoun and Rachel B. Bullard, born December 10, 1892 and raised in Rays Mill, GA (now Ray City).  In WWI he served in the U.S. Army.

Prior to WWI Joseph Burton Calhoun had been living in Moultrie, GA where in 1917, he was employed by J.M. Bryan as a mechanic. On June 5, 1917 he registered for the draft for WWI in Colquitt County. His draft card gave his physical description as medium in height and build, with light hair and blue eyes.

Nine months later, Joseph Burton Calhoun was back in Berrien County, GA where he married Louannie Boyette on March 4, 1918.

Joseph Burton Calhoun was inducted into the Army on December 18, 1917 in Moultrie, GA. He was photographed in uniform along with a fellow soldier, in what appears to be a souvenir post card print. After training with the  Machine Gun company of the 328th Infantry, Joseph Burton Calhoun served in the Military Police. Throughout WWI he was stationed with the Provost Guard Company at Camp Gordon, GA.  Calhoun apparently obtained a WWI souvenir from a returning soldier who had served overseas. A family heirloom is a bolt action .41 caliber Swiss rifle brought back from the war.

Swiss .41 WAFFENFABRIK-BERN-M78, serial # 187500. This rifle, pictured above, was acquired by Joseph Burton Calhoun during his service in WWI. The gun was manufactured circa 1885, one of a total of 228,000 ordered by the Swiss government. At the time of introduction, this rifle was one of the most advanced military rifles in Europe, but by WWI it was completely out-dated. (Image and information courtesy of Mitchell Calhoun)

Swiss .41 WAFFENFABRIK-BERN-M78, serial # 187500. This rifle, pictured above, was acquired by Joseph Burton Calhoun during his service in WWI. The gun was manufactured circa 1885, one of a total of 228,000 ordered by the Swiss government. At the time of introduction, this rifle was one of the most advanced military rifles in Europe, but by WWI it was completely out-dated. (Image and information courtesy of Mitchell Calhoun)

After the war Joseph Burton Calhoun returned to his wife and family in Ray City, GA.

(Special thanks to I. Mitchell Calhoun for contributions to this post.)

Updated 2/27/2016
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