Mayhaw Lake Resort at Ray City, GA

A previous post on this blog included the transcript of a 1914 advertisement for Mayhaw Lake  amusement park and attractions operated by Elias Moore “Hun” Knight at Ray’s Mill, GA (now known as Ray City), and other posts have provided some backstory on the park’s significance in the community (1914 Box Ball Alley ,   Ray City Baseball).

A Berrien County Historical Foundation newsletter features more information on  Mayhaw Lake and other historic resorts of Berrien County, GA.  The Foundation is a great resource for researching family history in Berrien County. Visit the website for newsletters, historical photos, and workshops:  http://www.freewebs.com/berrienhistorical/

Among the Mayhaw Lake patrons mentioned in the article you will find Bruner and Charlie Ruth Shaw, Bryant and Henry Swindle, Jessie and Shellie Ziegler, Burton and Rachel Shaw, Marshal Sirmans, Manson Johnson, Lonnie Swindle, Tom Parrish, Viola Smith Davis, Elmer Shaw, Hollis Williams, Charlie Shaw, Nannie Kate Moore, Thelma Moore, Paul Knight, Lonnie Smith, J. H. Swindle, Glenn Johnson, Juanita Shaw, Roy Carter and Rossie Swindle.

Berrien Historical Foundation Newsletter front page depicting the swimming pool at Mayhaw Lake, Ray City, GA.

Berrien Historical Foundation Newsletter front page depicting the swimming pool at Mayhaw Lake, Ray City, GA.

A 1922 report from the Georgia State Board of Health listed the swimming pool at Ray City as one of only 63 pools in the entire state.  The report found that a very large majority of these were in a very unsanitary condition and dangerous to be used for bathing purposes.

Related Posts:

Baseball in the Wiregrass

1914 Box Ball Alley ~ Mayhaw Lake at Rays Mill, GA

Ray City Baseball

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Texas Ray Goodman Entertains in Nashville, GA

Elizabeth Texas Ray was known all her life as “Texas.” She was born in Rays Mill, GA, the daughter of Thomas and Mary Ray.

On January 28, 1891 Texas Ray married Dr. William B. Goodman, of Nashville. The Goodman household was located on Jefferson Street, Nashville, GA.  In the Census of 1900, it was the very first Nashville household enumerated.

After her marriage, Texas Ray Goodman maintained her many friends and family connections in Ray’s Mill.  In the summer of 1899, the Tifton Gazette observed:

Tifton Gazette
Friday, July 28, 1899
Newsy Notes from Nashville

Several young ladies are visiting town. At Dr. Goodman’s, Misses Leila Knight, of Ray’s Mill, and Susie Dasher, of Sims; at Dr. Askew’s Misses Dora and Susan Williams, of Ty Ty, and Miss Monk of Worth County.

An entertainment was given by Mrs. Texas Goodman Tuesday evening last in honor of the visiting young ladies …

Later, after the death of her husband in 1912, Texas Goodman moved back to Ray City (formerly Rays Mill), GA where she lived with her adopted son, William F. Goodman, and her aged and widowed mother, Mary A. Ray.

Jay Sirmans ~ Gator Man of Rays Mill, GA

Jay Sirmans of Rays Mill, GA circa 1899

Jay Sirmans of Rays Mill, GA circa 1899

Jay Sirmans (1864 – 1916)

Jay Sirmans was born during the Civil War, April 16, 1864 in the vicinity of present day Ray City, GA . His father was Hardiman Sirmans, well known Confederate veteran and planter of Berrien County.

On 22 March 1893 Jay Sirmans married Rachel Allifar Smith (born July 30, 1869) daughter of Mary Jane Whitehurst and John Woods Smith.

The couple made their home near Rays Mill (nka Ray City), GA next door to Jay’s father, and Jay engaged in farming.

In February 1899 a son arrived in the Sirmans household. Perhaps it was fatherhood that encouraged  Jay Sirmans to seek enterprising opportunities for supplemental income, or perhaps it was the renowned exploits of his father.

Homeplace of Rachel Smith and Jay Sirmans. Left to right: John Hardeman Sirmans, Jay Sirmans, Jay Mitchell Sirmans, and Rachel Smith Sirmans. The Jay Sirmans home was located about 3 miles out of Ray City on what is now Cherokee Rose Road. Image courtesy of http://berriencounty.smugmug.com/

Homeplace of Rachel Smith and Jay Sirmans. Left to right: John Hardeman Sirmans, Jay Sirmans, Jay Mitchell Sirmans, and Rachel Smith Sirmans. The Jay Sirmans home was located about 3 miles out of Ray City on what is now Cherokee Rose Road. Image courtesy of http://berriencounty.smugmug.com/

What ever the reason, in the summer of 1899, it might be said that Jay Sirmans was up to his armpits in alligators.  The Valdosta Times reported the story.

Valdosta Times
Tuesday, July 25, 1899
A Big ‘Gator

Nashville. – A monster Alligator nine feet and nine inches in length was brought to town the first of the week by Mr. Jay Sirmans who with others captured him in Ray’s Pond after a hard fight during which his gatorship was severely gigged in the side.  Mr. Carson, the cattle buyer, had offered a good round sum for a large one to ship West alive, and it was for this purpose the ‘gator was brought here, but the wound in his side was of such a serious nature that he died from its effect soon after reaching here. No doubt he would have been a genuine curiosity in the land of the Rancheros.  – Berrien County News.

Rachel Shaw Moore Dies of Typhoid Fever

Rachel J. Shaw was born July 21, 1855 in Berrien County, GA. She was the daughter of Civil War veteran  Richard James Shaw (1830 – 1869) and  Rachel Elizabeth Parker (1834 – ?). Some time after 1870, Rachel Shaw married James Burton Moore, a Berrien County farmer. Making their home near Rays Mill (nka Ray City)  in the 1157th Georgia Militia District,  the couple set about the next twenty something years raising crops and children.

In the summer of 1899, Rachel Shaw Moore came down with an illness that was serious enough to prompt  medical attention. In the sweltering dog days of August, Rachel drove her horse-drawn buggy the ten miles of dirt road from Ray’s Mill to the county seat at Nashville, GA.  There she saw Dr. Carter who gave the diagnosis of typhoid and undertook her treatment.

According to the National Library of Medicine, “Typhoid fever is a bacterial infection characterized by diarrhea, systemic disease, and a rash — most commonly caused by the bacteria Salmonella typhi (S. typhi). The bacteria that causes typhoid fever — S. typhi — spreads through contaminated food, drink, or water. If you eat or drink something that is contaminated, the bacteria enters your body, and goes into your intestines, and then into your bloodstream, where it can travel to your lymph nodes, gallbladder, liver, spleen, and other parts of the body. Early symptoms include fever, general ill-feeling, and abdominal pain. A high (over 103 degrees) fever and severe diarrhea occur as the disease gets worse. Some people with typhoid fever develop a rash called “rose spots,” which are small red spots on the belly and chest.

Since 1880, the bacterial cause of typhoid fever had been known. The disease was spread by poor sanitation practices.

Typhoid fever exemplified the effectiveness of sanitation practices based on both the old filth theory of disease and at the same time incorporating the new tenets of bacteriology. When the salmonella typhi bacillus was identified (1880) and traced to contaminated water supplies, it underscored the necessity of providing clean water… 

Bacteriologists had perfected water filtering methods by the 1890s  which led to the development of water treatment systems for safe drinking water in the cities. At least in the urban centers, these water filtration systems effectively reduced the illness and death caused  by typhoid. “Yet typhoid did not disappear. In 1900, over 35,000 deaths in the United States were attributed to typhoid.” It would still be some years before scientists understood that apparently healthy individuals could harbor and transmit typhoid.  Mary Mellon of New York, “Typhoid Mary” was the most notorious case.

In the case of Rachel Moore, her condition continued to decline “despite medical treatment.’  It would be another 60 years before doctors understood the critical need for hydration in the treatment of typhoid.

Rachel Shaw Moore died on  a Monday – August 14, 1899 at Ray City, GA. She was buried at the cemetery at Cat Creek Primitive Baptist Church, a few miles southwest of Ray City.   She was survived by her husband, James Burton Moore, and six children:

 Lilly Moore 23
Minnie Moore 21
J Lacy Moore 20
Mamie Moore 13
Ora Moore 11
Janie Moore 9
Ounie Moore 6
Aulie Moore 2

Valdosta Times
Saturday, August 19, 1899
Mrs. Burton Moore Dead.
    Mrs. Burton Moore, an estimable lady of the Ray’s Mill settlement, died Tuesday evening after an illness of ten days with typhoid fever.  Her funeral was conducted at Cat Creek on Wednesday and was largely attended.  She leaves a husband and several children to mourn her death. Three of her daughters are about grown, though the other children are small.  She was about forty years old and an estimable woman. She leaves a large circle of friends to sympathize with the bereaved ones.

 Valdosta Times
Tuesday, August 22, 1899
Death of Mrs. J.B. Moore.
    We regret to chronicle the death of Mrs. J.B. Moore near Ray’s Mill on the 14th inst. This intelligence will cause widespread grief as the deceased was an exceedingly popular lady and leaves a large circle of friends and relatives to mourn her untimely death.
    About two weeks ago, she came  to Nashville in her buggy to consult Dr. Carter.  She had fever at that time, and doubtless the ride in the hot sun was bad for her.
    In spite of all that medical skill and loving hands could do, she sank steadily until death came on the night of the 14th.
    Mrs. Moore died from a complication of diseases.
    Our sympathies are tendered the bereaved ones.  – Nashville South Georgian.

 

 

Harriet Swindle Moore ~ First Lady of Ray City

Harriet “Hattie” Swindle Moore was First Lady of Ray City, GA from 1942-1944, during her husband’s term of office as Mayor.

Born on the day after Christmas, December 26,  1871, Harriet Swindle  was a daughter of  James Henry Swindle and Nancy Jane Parker.

Harriet Swindle and sister, Martha Ada Swindle, image detail from a photo taken in

Harriet Swindle (left) and sister, Martha Ada Swindle (right), image detail from a photo taken in front of the Swindle home place about two miles from Ray’s Mill (nka Ray City), Georgia, probably taken around 1890.

Harriet married James Lacy Moore on September 12, 1900 in Berrien County, GA.  The wedding was performed by  Elder  Aaron A. Knight.

Harriet Swindle and James Lacy Moore, Marriage License, September 12, 1900, Berrien County, GA. They were lifelong residents of Ray City, GA.

Related posts:

Mary Swindle Won $10 in Contest to Choose Name of Ray City

In a 1971 newspaper article, Henry A. Swindle, who was a lifelong resident of Ray City, GA, recalled  how the town got its name. Henry  was  a boy when the town became incorporated in 1909.  His father, Redding D. Swindle,  served as the appointed mayor until the first elections could be held.

Henry Alexander Swindle, son of R. D. and Mary Etta Swindle, orn September 15, 1897. Image courtesy of Bryan Shaw and the Berrien Historical Foundation www.berriencountyga.com

Henry Alexander Swindle, son of R. D. and Mary Etta Swindle, orn September 15, 1897. Image courtesy of Bryan Shaw and the Berrien Historical Foundation http://www.berriencountyga.com

The first residents  decided to hold a contest to select a new name for the town.  Henry’s mother, Mary Etta Swindle, came up with the winning entry.

She won $10,” he said, “for naming the town. There were many families around here named Ray, and since this was a thriving community, bigger then than Nashville or Lakeland, she thought  Ray City would be a good name. It was formerly Ray’s Mill.

“There was a sawmill and lumber mill here that employed about 300 people and a big cotton gin that baled lost of cotton.  Ray City was growing fast then, I was a good, big boy then and I’m 74 now. But Nashville was the county seat, and that town outgrew Ray City finally.”

Children of Mary Etta and Redding D. Swindle:

  1. Eula Swindle, born 1887; married Lawrence Cauley Hall
  2. Rozzie P Swindle, born 1889–
  3. Matie Swindle, born 1890–
  4. Daisy Swindle, born 1894–
  5. Henry Alexander Swindle, born 1897; married Ora Kathleen Knight
  6. Myrtle J Swindle, born 1900–
  7. Dewey L Swindle, born 1903–

Henry A. Swindle took a job as bookkeeper for J.J. Parks, who operated a grist mill and ginnery in Ray City and a farm in Alapaha. Henry married Ora Kathleen Knight, daughter of Sullivan J. Knight and Eliza Allen. He became a strong supporter of the Ray City Methodist Church and served on the Ray City School board.

Related Posts:

Ray City Alumni of Georgia Normal College and Business Institute at Abbeville, GA

See also Georgia Normal College and Business Institute,

When students in Ray’s Mill, GA sought educational opportunities beyond the common schools of the area, Georgia Normal College and Business Institute at Abbeville, Georgia was one option.  In 1902 cousins Lucius Jordan Clements and Bessie Clements graduated from the Institute. L.J. Clements went on to manage the operation of his family’s business, Clements Sawmill at Ray City.  His younger brother, William Grover Clements, also completed studies at the college and returned to Berrien County to become a teacher. Another Clements cousin  who attended the institute in 1911, Hod P. Clements, later founded the Bank of Ray City.

Students at Georgia Normal College and Business Institute. Abbeville, Georgia, 1911. Hod P. Clements (back row, 3rd from left) later became a banker in Ray City, GA.

Students at Georgia Normal College and Business Institute. Abbeville, Georgia, 1911. Hod P. Clements (back row, 3rd from left) later became a banker in Ray City, GA. Image coutesty of Berrien County Historical Foundation http://www.berriencountyga.com/

Campus of Georgia Normal College and Business Institute in Abbeville, GA

Campus of Georgia Normal College and Business Institute in Abbeville, GA

"Central Hotel" - Dormitory at Georgia Normal College and Business Institute in Abbeville, GA

“Central Hotel” Dormitory at Georgia Normal College and Business InstituteAbbeville, GA

1. The Atlanta Constitution. 30 May 1902. Abbeville College Closes. Atlanta, Georgia. pg 4

 

Almost Gone ~ Graves of D. Edwin Griner and Sarah Rouse at New Ramah Cemetery

Grave marker of D. Edwin Griner (June 21, 1870 - March 12, 1942), New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia.

Grave marker of D. Edwin Griner (June 21, 1870 – March 12, 1942), New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia.

In the 1930’s D. Edwin Griner  was a miller working at a grist mill in Ray City, GA.  He and his wife, Sarah “Sallie” Rouse grew up in Berrien County, GA and lived for many years in and around Ray City.   They are buried at New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, GA, although their grave markers have become almost illegible.

The cemetery at New Ramah is well tended these days, although the New Ramah Primitive Baptist Church was torn down last year. The concrete markers of Edwin and Sallie Griner have not suffered from neglect, just from the wear of time. Concrete is less durable than granite: Memory less durable than concrete.

Here, then, is a brief tribute to the memory of  Edwin and Sallie Griner:

D. Edwin Griner was born June 21, 1870 in Berrien County, GA, a scion of the earliest pioneer families of Georgia and of Berrien County. He was the eldest son of Sallie Gaskins and Samuel Griner.

His father was Samuel Jackson Griner (1848-1909). He was descended from the Greiner family who came to Georgia with the Salzberger immigration. Edwin’s Great Grandfather, Captain John Griner fought in the Revolutionary War.

His mother, Sarah C. “Sallie” Gaskins, was the daughter of Harmon and Malissa Gaskins, early settlers of Berrien County.  Her father fought in the Battle of Brushy Creek, the last real engagement with the Indians in this region.

Although the grave marker of D. Edwin Griner bears the birthdate of June 21, 1870, he is not recorded in his parents household in the Census of 1870, since the census that year only enumerated “the name of each Person whose place of abode, on 1st day of June, 1870, was in this family.” At the time of his birth, Edwin’s parents were living in the 1148th Georgia Militia District, and posting their mail in Nashville, GA.

Edwin’s father, Samuel J. Griner, worked as a farmer, although at 21 years of age he did not yet have any land of his own – he had $284 in his personal estate. Perhaps he was working the land owned by one of his  many Gaskins in-laws who lived nearby.

Through 1880, Edwin’s father continued to farm in the 1148th Georgia Militia District. Ten-year-old Edwin attended school, as did his younger siblings who were old enough. Although his mother was occupied “keeping house,” she had evidently suffered a disability of some type, for the 1880 census record shows that she was, “Maimed, Crippled, Bedridden, or otherwise disabled.”

On October 22, 1894 D. Edwin Griner married Sarah “Sallie” Rouse in Berrien County, GA.  She was the daughter of Robert and Kizzia Rouse. The couple made their home in the 1144th Georgia Militia District, the Rays Mill District where the census of 1900 shows they owned a farm near Sallie’s parents and others of the family connection.

D. Edwin Griner and Sallie Rouse were married October 22, 1894 in Berrien County, GA.

D. Edwin Griner and Sallie Rouse were married October 22, 1894 in Berrien County, GA.

In 1910, Edwin  and Sarah Griner were enumerated by census taker Redding D. Swindle there in the 1144th Georgia Militia District, the Rays Mill District, along with son William, and daughter Sarah V.  The Griners owned a farm, free and clear of mortgage, where Edwin was farming on his own account. Sarah’s family was farming in the same neighborhood. Her brother, Joseph Rouse, was working the farm next door, and also in Joseph’s household was her widowed mother, Kizzie N. Rouse. Nearby, was the farm of another brother, Alfred Rouse.

Some time prior to 1920 D. Edwin Griner moved his family to Clinch County, GA where he owned a farm on the Stockton Road in the Mud Creek District.  Edwin and  son, Willie, did the farming while his Sarah and daughter, Sarah V., kept house.

By 1930, the Griners had moved back to Ray City, Berrien County, GA.  They had a house in town valued at $700.  The household included Edwin, Sarah, and their son,  William, who had lost his wife.    Thelma Sirmans and her boys were renting the place next door, and the blacksmith, Henry Woodard, was another neighbor.  Edwin worked as a miller, a wage employee at a local grist mill.  His gravemarker shows that he was also a Mason, perhaps a member of the Ray City lodge No. 553, or one of the other local lodges.

D. Edwin Griner died March 12, 1942. He was buried at New Ramah Cemetery on Park Street, Ray City, GA.  At his side rests Sarah “Sallie” Rouse Griner.  No date of death is discernible on the concrete headstone marking her grave, but her obituary gives her date of death as January 29, 1951.

Sarah "Sallie" Rouse Griner, New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia.

Sarah “Sallie” Rouse Griner, New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia.

Griner graves at New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, GA. Left: Sarah "Sallie" Rouse Griner. Middle: D. E. Griner. Right: Willie "Bill" Edwin Griner.

Griner graves at New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, GA. Left: Sarah “Sallie” Rouse Griner. Middle: D. E. Griner. Right: Willie “Bill” Edwin Griner.

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“Black John” Griner Buried at New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, GA

According to Tharon Griffin, who published The Descendents of Emanuel Griner, John Martin Griner, Jr.  was known as  “Black John” Griner or sometimes as Johnnie Griner.  Black John Griner was the son of John Martin Griner and Emily Taylor.

His grandfather was one of the earlier settlers of Lowndes County, GA, and his father, John Martin Griner, Sr.  served as a Private  in Company I, 50th Infantry Regiment Georgia.  He was a brother of Robert Lee Griner.

Black John Griner married Francis Elizabeth Meyers on September 13, 1883 in Berrien County, GA.

John Griner and Lizze Meyers marriage Certificate, September 13, 1883, Berrien County, GA

John Griner and Lizze Meyers marriage Certificate, September 13, 1883, Berrien County, GA. Marriage Books, Berrien County Ordinary Court, Georgia Archives. http://cdm.sos.state.ga.us/u?/countyfilm,187634

John Griner died August 8, 1929.  He was buried at New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, GA.     His widow, Lizzie Griner,  was living at Ray City with her daughter Maggie and son-in-law Raymond R. Knight in the census of 1930.   Lizzie died in 1939 and was buried next to her husband.

Children  of  John Griner and Francis Elizabeth “Lizzie” Meyers were:

  • Jesse Waldon Griner -born May 9, 1896, Berrien County, GA; enlisted Navy, apprentice Seaman, December 28, 1917; later lived at Jasper, Fl.
  • Maggie Griner wife of Raymond R. Knight – Ray City, GA
  • Effie Griner  (married Harley D. Bostick) – Ray City, GA
  • Fannie Texas Griner – born November 24, 1891; married Abraham B. Lane; died April 3, 1965

John Martin Griner was survived by five siblings:

Henry Perry Griner
Lee Griner – [Robert Lee Griner]
Colon Griner
Mrs. Tom Myers – Ray City, GA
Mrs. G. A. Wheeless, Ray City, GA

Elizabeth Meyers and John M. Griner, New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia

Elizabeth Meyers and John M. Griner, New Ramah Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia

Related Post:

Tessica Vining (1888-1969), Ray City, GA

Tessica Vining of Ray City, Berrien County, GA
Tessica Vining of Ray City, Berrien County, GA

Tessica “Tessie” Vining, was born on was born March 28, 1888 in Ray’s Mill (nka Ray City), Georgia.  Her Father was Bani J. “Bench” Vining, her mother Martha Crosby Vining.

Tessica Vining married three times.

On September 14, 1902, she married Lucious Randal Miley  in Echols County, Georgia, son of Jane Monzingo and Randall Miley. He was born December 1875 in Lowndes County, Georgia, and died 1910 in Berrien County, Georgia.  Burial: Salem Methodist Church Cemetery, Lowndes County, Georgia

Children of TESSIE VINING and LUCIUS MILEY:

  1. ETHEL CELESTIAL MILEY, b. November 07, 1905,  Ray’s Mill (nka Ray City), Berrien County, Georgia; d. May 17, 1972, San Diego, California.
  2. CHARLES JONES MILEY, b. 1911, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia; d. January 05, 1965, Springfield, Clark County, Ohio.

She married John M. Booth on November 26, 1911 in Berrien County, Georgia, son of  William Booth and Henrietta Broxton.  He was born 1849 in Marlboro, Ware County, Georgia, and died 1914 in Berrien County, Georgia.

Children of TESSIE VINING and JOHN BOOTH is:

  1. HENRY CHARLES BOOTH, b. November 22, 1912, Berrien County, Georgia; d. April 29, 1991, Putnam County, Florida.

Her third husband was Robert Lee Griner. They were married  October 20, 1915 in Valdosta, Lowndes County, Georgia. He was the son of John Griner and Emily Taylor. He was born February 07, 1869 in Nashville, Berrien County, Georgia, and died February 2, 1940 in Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia.

Robert and Tessie made their home on east Main Street in Ray City   Their house was an unpainted low bungalow on the north side of the street in the block of land between Ward Street and the Teeterville Road.  They were neighbors of T. J. 

Robert Lee Griner already had eight children by his first wife, Fannie Lewis.  The children of Robert Lee Griner and Fannie Lewis were: Ora, Lula, Ruth, Robert James, Annie, Bartow, Leon L., and Elsie.  

Together, Tessica Vining and Robert Lee Griner had five more children.

Children of TESSIE VINING and ROBERT GRINER are:

  1. CLARENCE LEE GRINER, b. May 1915, Berrien County, Georgia; d. March 1946, Berrien County, Georgia. Burial: Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia
  2. ALICE LUDELL GRINER, b. November 07, 1917, Berrien County, Georgia; d. November 08, 1918, Berrien County, Georgia. Burial: Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia
  3. WILLIAM E. GRINER, b. May 16, 1919, Berrien County, Georgia; d. March 10, 1977, Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida. Burial: Fitzgerald Cemetery, Medulla, FL
  4. ARTHUR HARON GRINER, b. April 16, 1922, Berrien County, Georgia; d. September 20, 1981, Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida. Burial: Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia
  5. SADIE IRENE GRINER, b. October 1, 1927, Berrien County, Georgia; d. January 09, 2005, Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida.

Robert Lee Griner died February 2, 1940. He was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

It appears that after the death of  Robert Lee Griner,  Tessie and her daughter Sadie moved in with Griner kinfolk in Ray City.  They went to live with  William E. “Bill” Griner (1905-1884) who had a home on Main Street in Ray City and who worked at the Ray City School.  This home was an unpainted, low, wooden bungalow on the north side of Main Street on the block of land between Ward Street and Samuel Street. Their neighbors to the west were the family of Caulie and Marietta Smith.

Tessie Vining Griner died October 19, 1961 in Echols County, GA, and was buried Beaver Dam Cemetery,  Ray City, Berrien County, GA.

 TIMES – UNION JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA

October 28, 1961 page 7- B

MRS. TESSIE R. GRINER, 73 of 525 E. 60th St. died Thursday evening at a local hospital. Mrs Griner was born in Ray City, Ga, and had lived in Jacksonville a year. She was a Baptist. Survivors include four sons, Henry Booth, Jacksonville, A. Herring Griner, Jacksonville, Charlie Miley, Springfield, Ohio, William Griner, Highland City. Two daughters, Mrs. W.D. Gilleland, Los Angeles, Cal. and Mrs. Sadie Beauchamp, Tampa. Four step-daughters and 3 step-sons. Several grandchildren. Funeral will be at 4P.M. Sat. in the Beaver Dam Baptist Church, Ray City, Ga. Internment will be in Beaver Dam Cemetery, the body was taken to Ray City, Ga. Friday evening. Gidden Funeral Home is in Charge. 

Robert Lee Griner (1869-1940) and Tessie Vining (1888-1961), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia.
Robert Lee Griner (1869-1940) and Tessie Vining (1888-1961), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, Georgia.

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