Family of Maxie Snead Patten

Maxie Snead Patten (1912-1992)

Maxie Snead Patten was a well known athlete, teacher, coach, youth leader and author of Berrien County, GA.  On September 3, 1950 Maxie Snead Patten addressed the youth of the Ray City community at the Ray City Baptist Church.

Maxie Snead, 1929 school photo. Image detail courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

Maxie Snead, 1929 school photo. Image detail courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

Family of Maxie Snead Patten <br>Front row: Maxie Snead Patten holding Reba (her daughter), Laura Youmans Snead (holding baby), William M. “Bill” Snead, little boys are David Lovett and Jimmy Lovett, Inez Snead Lovett, holding granddaughter, Jan Lovett. <br>2nd Row L-R: Henry Snead, Billy Snead, Annette Snead Ensley (Billy and Annette’s father was Walter Snead, one of the 8 Snead siblings, who died in his late twenties, when his children were young.), Myrt Snead Willis, Willie Mae “Bill” Sapp, Eugene Lovett (Inez’s husband). <br>3rd Row L-R: Dorothy Snead (wife of Felton “Crip Snead), Tom Skinner, Mary Lovett Skinner. <br>4th Row L-R: Arlo Snead (wife of Henry Snead), Martha “Boots” Lovett Paulk, Martha Jim Lovett (wife of James Lovett). <br>Back Row L-R: Grover Patten (husband of Maxie), Colonel Dewitt Sapp, Felton “Crip” Snead, James Lovett <br>Man behind Mary Lovett Skinner with face partially hidden is unknown. <br> One other Snead sibling, Nettie, died in her twenties, not shown. <br>Courtesy of Reba Patten Mason and Linda Ward Meadows.

Family of Maxie Snead Patten
Front row: Maxie Snead Patten holding Reba (her daughter), Laura Youmans Snead (holding baby), William M. “Bill” Snead, little boys are David Lovett and Jimmy Lovett, Inez Snead Lovett, holding granddaughter, Jan Lovett.
2nd Row L-R: Henry Snead, Billy Snead, Annette Snead Ensley (Billy and Annette’s father was Walter Snead, one of the 8 Snead siblings, who died in his late twenties, when his children were young.), Myrt Snead Willis, Willie Mae “Bill” Sapp, Eugene Lovett (Inez’s husband).
3rd Row L-R: Dorothy Snead (wife of Felton “Crip” Snead), Tom Skinner, Mary Lovett Skinner.
4th Row L-R: Arlo Snead (wife of Henry Snead), Martha “Boots” Lovett Paulk, Martha Jim Lovett (wife of James Lovett).
Back Row L-R: Grover Patten (husband of Maxie), Colonel Dewitt Sapp, Felton “Crip” Snead, James Lovett
Man behind Mary Lovett Skinner with face partially hidden is unknown.
One other Snead sibling, Nettie, died in her twenties, not shown.
Courtesy of Reba Patten Mason and Linda Ward Meadows.

Maxie Snead played on the “Nashville Wonder Six” Southeast Georgia Championship teams of 1927,  1928, and 1929. Among her team mates was Ida Lou Giddens, daughter of Ray City barber and mayor Lyman Franklin Giddens.

Maxie Snead played on the 1929 Nashville Public School girls basketball team, nicknamed the “Nashville Wonder Six”. For the three seasons 1927, 1928, 1929, the team record was 70 wins against only 4 losses. In 1927 they went 20-0 and won the Southeast Georgia Championship, also winning the Southeast Georgia Championship in 1928 and 1929. Seated left to right: Ida Lou Giddens Fletcher, Nell Powell McCloud, Silvia Bonnett, Evelyn Carter Wilkes. Standing: Maxie Snead Patten, Bill Griffin Register, and Coach Willie Chisholm. Image courtesy of www.berriencountyga.com

Maxie Snead played on the 1929 Nashville Public School girls basketball team, nicknamed the “Nashville Wonder Six.” For the three seasons 1927, 1928, 1929, the team record was 70 wins against only 4 losses. In 1927 they went 20-0 and won the Southeast Georgia Championship, also winning the Southeast Georgia Championship in 1928 and 1929. Seated left to right: Ida Lou Giddens Fletcher, Nell Powell McCloud, Silvia Bonnett, Evelyn Carter Wilkes. Standing: Maxie Snead Patten, Bill Griffin Register, and Coach Willie Chisholm. Image courtesy of http://www.berriencountyga.com

In the 1930s Maxie Snead Patten coached the girls basketball teams at New Lois School to the Berrien County Championship. Team member Alma Luke later attended the Ray City School.

New Lois Girls Basketball, Champions 1937-1938 Mrs. Patten, Edna Bennett, Myrtice Jordan, Hazel Ray, Hazel Fletcher, Alma Luke, Lucille Knowles. Photo courtesy of Faye Jernigan and www.berriencountyga.com

1937-38 New Lois Girls Basketball Team, Berrien County Champions 
Mrs. Maxie Snead Patten, Edna Bennett, Myrtice Jordan, Hazel Ray, Hazel Fletcher, Alma Luke, Lucille Knowles. Photo courtesy of Faye Jernigan and http://www.berriencountyga.com

 

 

 

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1914 Nashville Nine

At age 16 Dewey Knight was a coach and player for the Nashville High School baseball team of 1914. A son of Jonathan Perry Knight and Ada Parrish, he  was born at Rays Mill, GA (now Ray City) on May 1, 1898, but grew up in Nashville, Georgia.   Team mascot Lucius Eugene Griner was a son of James B. “Jim” Griner, who would later serve as Police Chief of Ray City.

 

1914 Nashville Nine

Nashville High School Nine.  The players in the photo are, left to right: Standing, Dewey Knight, Sub and coach; Noble Hull, pitcher and manager; Emory Gary, first base; Robert Hendricks,second base; June Norwood, short-stop; Willie Peeples, catcher and captain.  Sitting: Homer Connell, centerfield; Lucius Griner, mascot; Basom Webb, left field; Hobart Alexander, third base; Alvah Webb, right field.

Nashville High School Nine. The players in the photo are, left to right: Standing, Dewey Knight, Sub and coach; Noble Hull, pitcher and manager; Emory Gary, first base; Robert Hendricks,second base; June Norwood, short-stop; Willie Peeples, catcher and captain. Sitting: Homer Connell, center field; Lucius Griner, mascot; Basom Webb, left field; Hobart Alexander, third base; Alvah Webb, right field.

The Atlanta Constitution
March 8, 1914

Nashville High School Nine 1914

Nashville, Ga., March 7. – (Special.) The Nashville High school ball team was organized Friday, February 12. The boys elected Noble Hull manager unanimously. Willie Peeples was made captain of the squad, while June Norwood will be treasurer.

The school heretofore has not had an organized ball team, and there it is very evident that it will make a “hit” with the school as well as the surrounding community.

The teachers have all pledged themselves to do all they can for the maintenance of the organization financially and otherwise.

The team is preparing a play from which the proceeds will go for the support of said team. Other measures of obtaining funds have and will be resorted to.

The boys work together “better than any bunch that have ever worn Nashville uniforms.” They are all about the same size and are capable of understanding each other magnificently.

The boys of said team claim that they are “unbeatable” by any high school team of south Georgia. Beginning with March 14 the boys challenge any high school for one or three games.

Address all challenges to N. A. Hull, Manager

 

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Ag Teachers go to War

St. Elmo Lee, 1939

St. Elmo Lee, 1939, served with the 902nd Artillery at Leyte, WWII

On October 24, 1942 vocational agriculture teacher St. Elmo Lee gave up his classrooms at Ray City  and New Lois, GA for the U.S. Army.  He was inducted at Fort McPherson, Atlanta, GA for the duration of the war. He was single, 5′ 9″ tall and weighed 134 pounds.

St. Elmo Lee enlisted as a private, eventually serving as a sergeant in Battery C, 902nd Field Artillery Battalion 77th Division.  He fought in the Pacific Theater of Operations from March 30, 1944 to November 22, 1945 during which time he was involved in amphibious assaults and  campaigns on the Marshall Islands, Southern Philippines, and Ryukyu Islands.

U.S. howitzer fires on Catmon Hill, Leyte, Phillipines. October 20, 1944.

U.S. howitzer fires on Catmon Hill, Leyte, Philippines. October 20, 1944.
St. Elmo Lee, of Ray City, GA participated in the Battle of Leyte with the 902nd Field Artillery Battalion. In November 1944 the 902nd provided artillery support for the 77th Division operations in the Battle of Leyte.

In November 1944 the 902nd Field Artillery Battalion provided support for the 77th Division operations in the Battle of Leyte. In April 1945 the 902nd was with the 77th Division in the first attack on the Ryukyu Islands, seizing the islands west of Okinawa, and later moving to Okinawa itself.

St. Elmo Lee continued to serve until the end of the war.  He was returned to Fort McPherson, GA for his discharge on January 1, 1946.

Among the decorations he received were:

  • Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal with 3 Bronze Stars and One Bronze Arrowhead
  • Philippine Liberation Medal with one Bronze star
  • Good Conduct Medal
  • American Campaign Medal
  • World War Two Victory Medal

After the war, a pamphlet was published to honor the contributions of Georgia’s agriculture teachers, A Memorial to Georgia Teachers of Vocational Agriculture who fought, suffered, died and worked to win the war.

Among the area agriculture teachers who served were: St. Elmo Lee, of Ray City and New Lois schools,  J. V. Wynn from Nashville and Poplar Springs schools; W. C. Thigpen, Jr. of Barney; W.E. Rooks and Hal Godwin, of Homerville; K. N. Phillips from Ocilla; and J. I. Musselwhite, of Willacoochee; R. E. King, Jr., of Clyattville and Lake Park; John Hensley of Hahira;  H. C. Dorminey from Tifton; and Tom M. Cordell, of Abraham Baldwin.

1946 war memorial to Georgia teachers of vocational agriculture.

1946 war memorial to Georgia teachers of vocational agriculture.

 ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-SEVEN TEACHERS ENTERED THE SERVICE

One hundred and fifty-seven teachers of vocational agriculture left their classrooms and entered the Armed Service between 1941 and 1945. More than two-thirds of these served in the army, about one-fourth in the navy, and the rest in the Marines.  

These teachers scattered to the four corners of the earth. To the damp humid jungles, to the freezing temperature of the Aleutians, to the barren sand-swept deserts, they went to do their bit for Uncle Sam. But no matter how far away from home, their thoughts stayed in Georgia.

Seven of these men made the supreme sacrifice. Some of the men were injured; they came back maimed for life, wearers of the Purple Heart. Some were captured and suffered the horrors known only to “prisoners of war.” Many were decorated for courageous actions. All made courageous contributions to winning the war.

The accumulated stories of these teachers would probably fill a book. Some were baptized in fire with American forces that swept across France and into Germany itself. Others fought from the decks of ships or cheated death in flaming battles of the skies. Still others who may have wanted to get in the active fighting were assigned to shore stations in this country or abroad.

But all of the men have stories to tell-if they wanted to talk. It is highly probable that the experience of the men give them a more international point of view. They have seen enough to convince them that this is now in reality one world. And they have had an opportunity to see where Georgia and her agriculture fit into the scheme of things.

Today, some of the teachers are returning to the classrooms they left behind; some are teachers of vocational agriculture in new fields; others are instructors in the newly developed Veterans Farmer Training Program.

Georgia is glad to welcome back her sons. They have done a good job where they were and there is still a job for them to do here. It is good to see the official family of vocational agriculture getting back together again.

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Marjorie Johnson Nash Widowed in 1962

Marjorie Ruth Johnson, daughter of  Mr. and Mrs. Lacy Johnson of Ray City, GA, attended  Nashville High School, Nashville, GA. She married high school classmate William E. Nash, on September 9, 1951.  Tragically, their marriage was cut short when Billy Nash died in an automobile accident in 1962.

Nashville Herald
December 6, 1962

Billy Nash Laid To Rest Thursday

    Funeral services were held Saturday, December 1, 1962, for William E. (Billy) Nash, who passed away at the age of 31 on Thursday, November 29, 1962, the victim of a tragic traffic accident.
    He had lived in Berrien County all of his life, having been born on October 29, 1931, a son of Dewey and Louise Cato Nash of Route 2, Nashville.  At the time of his untimely death, he had been engaged in farming. Mr. Nash had been a member of the Community Methodist Church and served on the Board of Stewards of the Church.
    The last sad rites were conducted by Rev. Felton Gaskins and Rev. D.R. Dixon at Long Bridge Church, with interment following in the Long Bridge cemetery.  Appropriate music was furnished by a quartet compose(d) of Roy F. Davis, Herbert Griffin, Owen Griffin and Mrs. Carl Wilkerson, who movingly rendered O Come Angel Band, When They Ring Those Golden Bells, and God Will Take Care of You.
    Active pallbearers were Lewis Fountain, Clyde Moore, Furman Ray, Buren Allen, Ferrell Herring, Charles Moore; those serving as honorary pallbearers were Pete Akins, Alton Akins, C.B. Ray, Harmon Cornelius, Isbon Walker, J.B. Bennett, Roy Allen, W.H. Dix, F.P. Griner, A.D. Osborne, A.C. Kimble, and C.H. Ray.
    The deceased is survived by his wife, the former Marjorie Ruth Johnson, whom he married on September 9, 1951, two sons, Dale and Donnie Nash, one daughter, Sheryl; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Nash; two brothers, Ernie Nash, of Nashville, Kenneth Nash, of Atlanta; one sister, Mrs. Vernice Boggs of Atlanta.

Transcription courtesy of Skeeter Parker.

William Edward Nash, Long Bridge Cemetery, Berrien County, GA

William Edward Nash, Long Bridge Cemetery, Berrien County, GA