Family of Chloe Gardner Johnson

Chloe Ann Gardner Johnson

Chloe Ann Gardner Johnson and her husband, Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson, were residents of Ray City, GA for more than 40 years. They were well known in the community and operated businesses in Ray City and Nashville.

Chloe Ann Gardner and Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson on their wedding day, December 17, 1899.  They were married at the Methodist Church in DuPont, GA.  Image courtesy of Julie Hutson.

Chloe Ann Gardner and Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson on their wedding day, December 17, 1899. They were married at the Methodist Church in DuPont, GA. Image courtesy of Julie Hutson.

Chloe Ann Gardner was born November 11, 1879,  a daughter of Martha Ann McCall and Joseph Flournoy Gardner.  She was named after her grandmother, Chloe Ann Folsom. Her great grandfather, Pennywell Folsom fell at Brushy Creek during the Indian War of 1836.

Chloe’s father, Joseph Flournoy Gardner (1856-1947), was from Alabama. As a young man he moved to Bartow in Hamilton County, FL. This community, now lost, was perhaps about 50 miles south of Ray’s Mill, GA. There, he married Chloe’s mother, Martha Ann McCall (1856-1932).

Chloe grew up in Hamilton County, FL. Some time before 1900 her parents had moved farther south to central Florida. In 1899, Chloe married Joseph Henry Pascal “Joe” Johnson of DuPont, GA. They were married in the Methodist Church in Dupont.

Chloe Ann Gardner Johnson with her children, parents and siblings, circa 1909.

Chloe Ann Gardner Johnson with her children, parents and siblings, circa 1909. Left to right, top row: sisters Emma Gardner Langdale, Celeta Gardner, Jennie Gardner. Middle row: Elroy Langdale with son J. D. Langdale, Joseph Flourney Gardner, Ponce de Leon Gardner, Martha Ann McCall Gardner, Chloe Ann Gardner Johnson with son Lawton Johnson. Front row: Martha Leona Gardner, Charles “Charlie” Leon Bryan, Chloe’s children – Floyd B. Johnson, Rowan Glenn Johnson, Mildred “Dish” Lee Johnson, Joseph Wallace Johnson. Then David H Stewart, his son Elton Stewart, and Mary Gardner Stewart. Image courtesy of Julie Hutson.

Children of Chloe Ann Gardner Johnson and Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson:

  1. Rowan Glenn Johnson 1901 – 1962
  2. Joseph Wallace Johnson 1903 – 1986
  3. Mildred “Dish” Lee Johnson 1905 – 1989
  4. Floyd B Johnson 1906 – 1982
  5. Lawton Walker Johnson 1908 – 1945
  6. Bess “Bessie” Gardner Johnson 1911 – 2005
  7. Geraldine Blanche Johnson 1915 – 1989
  8. James Howard Pascal Johnson 1918 – 1988
  9. Robert Bruce Johnson 1919 – 2008
  10. Max Maurice Johnson 1922 – 2012

For several years, the Johnsons, JHP and Chloe, made their home in Dupont, but some time before 1918 moved to Ray City, GA where they remained for the rest of their lives.

50th wedding anniversary of Chloe Ann Gardner and Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson, 1949. Image courtesy of Julie Hutson.

50th wedding anniversary of Chloe Ann Gardner and Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson, 1949. Image courtesy of Julie Hutson.

From the King’s Tree to Ray City: Family of JHP Johnson

Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson of Ray City, GA

For more than forty years Joseph Henry Pascal “Joe” Johnson was a resident and merchant of Ray City, GA. The Johnson’s were among the pioneer families of Wiregrass Georgia, and among colonists who settled in the 1700s at the King’s Tree in South Carolina. His father was a captain with the Confederate States Army. His grandfather fought in the Indian Wars and was a Major General of the State Militia.  His great grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and his great great grandfather was a South Carolina colonist in 1732.

Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson, tintype. Image courtesy of Julie Hutson.

Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson, tintype, as a boy in Clinch County, GA. Image courtesy of Julie Hutson.

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SON OF CAPTAIN ROWAN BURNETT JOHNSON

JHP “Joe” Johnson was born February 22, 1859 in DuPont, GA. He was a son of Rowan Burnett Johnson and Caroline Amanda Floyd (1842 – 1872). His mother died when Joe was about 13 years old. His father was remarried to a widow, Emaline Dame Clifton.

Rowan Burnett Johnson and Emaline Dame Johnson, father and step-mother of J.H.P. Johnson. Image courtesy of Julie Hutson.

Rowan Burnett Johnson and Emaline Dame Johnson, father and step-mother of J.H.P. Johnson. Image courtesy of Julie Hutson.

Memoirs of Georgia” Vol. I, Pg 500 Southern Historical Association, 1895

Rowan B. Johnson, planter, Dupont, Clinch Co., Ga., was born in Lowndes county, Nov. 29, 1830. Three years afterward his father moved to Ware, now Clinch county. He was raised on the plantation, and has devoted himself to agriculture all his life. His education was limited to such as could be obtained at the common schools of the county. When only sixteen years of age he was elected captain of the militia – District 1280 – at a time when it was regarded as a local distinction; and in 1850 was elected a justice of the peace. In 1862 he enlisted in Company B, Second Georgia battalion, and was made first lieutenant. In 1863 he joined the Sixth Georgia regiment, Western division, was commissioned captain of Company I, and served through the war. Returning from the war he resumed farming, and was soon afterward elected a justice of the inferior court, and served a term of four years. In 1892 he was again chosen to represent Clinch county in the General Assembly and as a democrat defeated his populist opponent by and overwhelming majority – more than doubled him. In 1884 he was nominated to represent Clinch county in the General assembly and defeated his opponent by a large majority. Two years later he was again a candidate, and was defeated by a small majority; but in 1869 he was elected to fill the unexpired term of Hon. James P. Mattox (deceased), showing that the people appreciate his ability and services, and have confidence in him as a faithful custodian of their interests. While in the general assembly he was a member of the committees on agriculture, counties and county matters, military affairs and penitentiary. These frequent political successes testify to the strong hold he has on the confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens. Mr. Johnson has been married three times. His first wife was Miss Aleph, daughter of John Tomlinson, who died in 1862. For his second wife he married Miss Amanda, daughter of Jason Floyd, who died in February, 1870. He next married Mrs. Emeline (nee Dame), widow of William H. Clifton, and daughter of George Dame. He is a master Mason, and a prominent member of the Primitive Baptist church.

Rowan B. Johnson was a devout Primitive Baptist. In 1859 he deeded the land for the site of Prospect Church.The church is situated about four miles north of DuPont, GA. This church was constituted January 22, 1859. Rowan B. Johnson died on 19 June 1904 at age 73. He was buried at Prospect Church Cemetery.

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GRANDSON OF MAJOR GENERAL DAVID JOHNSON, JR.

JHP Johnson’s grandfather was Major General David Johnson, Jr., of the Georgia State Militia. He fought in the Indian Wars of 1836 and raised five sons who fought in the Civil War, including JHP’s father, Rowan B. Johnson.

Nancy "Mary Ann" Burnett and Major General David Johnson, Jr. were grandparents of Joseph Howard Pascal Johnson, of Ray City, GA.

Nancy “Mary Ann” Burnett and Major General David Johnson, Jr. were grandparents of Joseph Howard Pascal Johnson, of Ray City, GA.

The following information on General David Johnson, Jr, Grandfather of JHP Johnson, is adapted from the Miles Files of the Virginia Eastern Shore Library:

Major General David Johnson, Jr. was born on 29 January 1804 at Bulloch Co, GA. He was born in Bulloch County, now Emanuel County, Georgia, the seventh child of eleven born to Martha Hardeman and David Johnson (R.S.). He grew up on the Fifteen Mile Creek, waters of the big Ohoopee River. When he was 20 years old he moved with his father and family to what is now Clinch County, GA. They lived there for about three years when they moved to Leon County, FL, then a territory. After helping his father get settled in Leon County, he moved back to Irwin County, now Lowndes County, in 1828. He married circa 1828 and settled near where Valdosta now stands. He married Nancy ‘Mary Ann’ Burnett, daughter of John and Molsy Sheppard Burnett. They moved back to Ware, now Clinch County, GA and lived there the remainder of his life. He fought through the Indian War of 1836 and won a Commission of Captain. He was noted for his coolness and bravery. Captain David Johnson’s Brigade of Georgia Militia was ordered into Federal Service of the United States by Governor Charles S. McDonald from the first day of November to the thirty-first day of December 1834 [1839?]. He was commissioned Major General of the 2nd Brigade, 6th Division of the State Militia on 16 December 1850. He resigned 22 February 1861. He felt very strongly over his failure to keep the Militia under his command active although the same condition existed all over Georgia in the State Militia, so when the Civil War and possible invasion seemed imminent and the State Militia was not ready for the emergency, General Johnson felt like he was partly to blame, which of course was not true. General Johnson lost two sons in the Civil War; Private Bryant Johnson, Company H (Thomas County Volunteers), 29th Georgia Infantry, died March 11, 1862 of measles and pneumonia in the hospital at Savannah,GA; and Private William S. Johnson, Company G, Clinch Volunteers, 50th Georgia Regiment, died on May 22, 1864 from gun shot wounds in a hospital at Stanton, VA. His other three sons served also: Captain Rowan Burnett Johnson, Company J, 11th Georgia Cavalry; Lieutenant David Hardeman Johnson, 11th Georgia Cavalry; and Private Joseph Burton Johnson in Company H (Thomas County Volunteers), 29th Georgia Infantry. General Johnson survived the war and lived until he was 77. An article in The Valdosta Times on 20 May 1876 reported the General accidently shot himself in his right hand and left knee after returning from a hunt. The Valdosta Times of 23 April 1881 reported his death on 9 April 1881. “He left an aged wife, six children and a host of devoted friends to mourn his departure to that other world. The writer knew him well and knew him to possess a heart filled with the milk of human kindness and a head stored with that ripeness of judgment.” Maj. Gen. David Johnson Jr. was buried at Fender Cemetery, Lanier Co, GA

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GREAT GRANDSON OF DAVID JOHNSON, REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIER

The following information on David Johnson, Revolutionary Soldier  and great  grandfather of Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson, is adapted from the Miles Files of the Virginia Eastern Shore Library:

David Johnson (R.S.) was born in 1765 at Lorens Co, SC. It is said that his grandfather, David Johnson, was among a colony of 40 Scotch-Irish families under the leadership of Roger Gordon who settled near on the on Black River at “the King’s Tree,” South Carolina in 1732. This colony came up the Black River and disembarking from their vessel at Brown’s Ferry, blazed their way through the forests along what is now the Kingstree-Georgetown road to the King’s tree. These were the first settlers in Williamsburg Township. (Page 10, 21-22, History of Williamsburg.) The greater number of these families had lived in Ireland for many years before coming to America. They had migrated from England and Scotland to Ireland on account of fair promises on the part of the English King. David Johnson, born ca 1760-65, served in the Revolutionary War under Colonel Philemon Waters troops, Colonel Middleton’s Regiment, and General Sumter’s Brigade for 10 months until the end of the war. (See Stub Entries to Endents for Revolutionary War Claims, Book L-N No. 512 Lib. M.) His signature was compared to a bond in Bulloch County Court, 1810 term of Superior Court. Hustus Studstill and Josiah Sirmans were indicted in a case (later dismissed) and David Johnson and Jonathan Studstill were sureties. This was an original signature on the bond and it was the same as signature on Indent Record for Revolutionary War. David Johnson (R.S.) married Martha Hardman, daughter of Capt. Thomas Hardyman (R.S.) and Elizabeth (—–), in 1792 at Effingham Co, GA.The Hardymans (Hardeman) came from Virginia to South Carolina, St. David’s Parish of old Cheraw. Elizabeth Johnson, David’s sister, married Joseph Hardman, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Hardaman about 1781. Page 245 of “History of the Old Cheraws” by Rev. Alexander Gregg, DD shows William Johnson, Ensign, Captain Thomas Hardyman, and Ensign Joseph Hardyman in September 1775 being commissioned as Officers in Colonel Powell’s Regiment of Militia for duty in the Revolutionary War. David and Martha Hardaman Johnson settled on Fifteen Mile Creek which was a part of the Big Ohoopee River in Bulloch County, now Emanuel County. They settled there about 1794 after their first land grant from Washington County, now Emanuel County. The census for 1840 shows David and Martha Johnson in Emanuel as follows: 2 males under age 10, 2 males age 10-16, 1 male over age 45, 1 female under age 10, 1 female over age 45, 2 female slaves & 2 male slaves. About 1823, David and Martha Johnson sold out in Emanuel County and moved to what is now Clinch County, GA. After a few years they moved to Leon County, Florida, acquiring property there January 31, 1827. They are included in the 1830 census of Leon County, Florida as follows: 2 males age 15-20, 1 male age 60-70, 2 male slaves under age 10, 1 male slave age 10-24, 1 male slave age 36-55, 3 female slaves age 10-24. David Johnson died in Leon County, Florida on April 14, 1834 and Martha died March 23, 1837 in Leon County, Florida. They are both buried in a cemetery on his home place in Leon County, Florida. There are no markers on their graves. David made a will on 19 March 1834 at Leon Co, FL:

I, David Johnson, being of sound mind, but in low state of health; and knowing that all men must dye; do this day freely give in this deed to the heirs of my beloved son Young Johnson after my death a certain Negro woman by the name of Lucy, her children Neis, Peter, Moses & Hanner and her increases after this, they are to be kept by him after my death by the said Young Johnson. Moreover, I do give and bequeath to the said Young Johnson all my dwelling house and kitchen furniture and working tools, also five cows and calves. I also do give & bequeath a certain Negro man Clint and a feather bed and furniture belonging to said bed to my beloved son Joseph Johnson after my death. I do also give and bequeath a certain yellow Negro woman called Dinah to my beloved daughter Martha Sirman after my death. I do also give and bequeath a certain Negro woman called Flora to my beloved son David Johnson after my death. I do further give and bequeath the remainder of my beloved children all of the remainder of my stock of cattle after my beloved son Young Johnson gets his five cows and calves out of my stock. I do give and bequeath the above named cattle to my beloved daughters Risa Register, Amelia Wilks, Lavina Mosely and Mary Jones. I have already given as much as I do conceive to be right to my other two beloved children John A. Johnson and Elizabeth Rich. Witt: Allen Skipper, Benjamin Skiper & Nathan Powell.

A daughter of David Johnson, R.S.,  was Martha Johnson who married Lowndes County pioneer Benjamin Sirmans.

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GREAT GREAT GREAT GRANDSON OF DAVID JOHNSON, COLONIST OF SOUTH CAROLINA

David Johnson, it is said, came to South Carolina and settled in 1732 at the King’s Tree, near the Black River.

 Detail of Sam Cook's 1773  map of South Carolina showing the location of Kingstree.

Detail of Sam Cook’s 1773 map of South Carolina showing the location of Kings Tree.

THE KING’S TREE AT WILLIAMSBURG, SC

Williamsburg, named after William of Orange, was one of eleven townships ordered by King George II in 1730 meant to develop the “back country” of the Carolina Province. The township was a part of Craven County, one of the original four counties that encompassed present South Carolina. Williamsburg Township then included most of the present Pee Dee region. The township consisted 20,000 acres (80 km²) and was located in front of the Black River. It was later divided and became a number of separate counties, including present Williamsburg County, South Carolina. A white pine tree on the Black River was marked by early surveyor with the King’s Arrow to claim it for the King. The tree was referred to as “The King’s Tree,” and became the center of the new township. Kingstree eventually became the chief town of Williamsburg township. In 1732 a colony of forty Scots-Irish led by Roger Gordon came up the river by boat and settled in the vicinity of the King’s Tree. They were poor Protestants who had come from northern Ireland. They had settled there seeing a better life than in Scotland, before migrating to America.

Ray City Prosperity Proclaimed Amid 1929 Stock Market Crash

In 1929, less than 30 days  after Black Tuesday and  the beginning of the stock market crash,  the Nashville Herald was running stories to bolster the local Berrien County, GA economy.  The Ray City “booster” story assured readers that the bank in Ray City was financially strong,  and that trade was brisk among the  businesses of the town.

The Nashville Herald, front page, November 21, 1929
RAY CITY A VERY PROSPEROUS SECTION

BY CHAS, HIMSELF

In keeping with the policy of the Herald to boost and build up all sections of Berrien County, Mr. A.W. Starling and myself spent Monday afternoon in the interest of a Ray City Community page which appears in another section of this edition.  Upon our arrival, which was the first stop we had ever made in this enterprising town, we were greeted by our old friend, Mr. C.H. Winderweedle, of the firm of Johnson and Winderweedle, who do a general mercantile business and carry in connection a high grade line of groceries.  Mr. Winderweedle showed us every consideration and was one of the first of the business men of the community to sign up for one of the spaces in the booster page.  He was quite a bit more optimistic than some of th merchants called upon and stated that although his was a new firm that he was well pleased with their beginning and intimated that with the bargains they were offering that the and his partner anticipated a continued growth in trade.

Our next stop was made at the Citizens Bank of Ray City, where we had the pleasure of meeting Mr. John D. Luke, the popular and efficient cashier of the institution.  Mr. Luke is a man of very pleasing personality and during our short conversation we can very easily understand why the banking institution of which he is the head has prospered as it has.  As we understand it the Citizens Bank of Ray City is one of the strongest financial institutions in the county and its business is growing steadily as will be shown by the last financial statement as called for by the superintendent of state banks.  It has total resources of over $150,000, and deposits of over $100,000 and shows that it has no notes and bills rediscounted.  Berrien county is justly proud of its banking institutions and conservative business men do not hesitate to place the Citizens Bank of Ray City along with the head of list.

We casually visited the firm of Swindle and Clements and were surprised to find the class of merchandise that a large force of clerks were busy dispensing to a large number of customers who were continually pouring in and out of the store.  In fact their rush was so great that it was several minutes before we could interview Mr. Clements, and when we did he readily agreed with our proposition to assist in boosting the county and he and Mr. Swindle readily signed up for one of the ads on the Ray City Booster Page.  While in his store we were what might be termed a “victim of circumstance” insamuch as we spied a string of jack fish, which were so near uniform size that we became attracted to them and after getting their weight, bought the six pound string for the insignificant sum of 90 cents.  Mr. Clements stated that his firm always has a supply of these fresh water fish on hand, which are alive when brought to his store, and supplies the lovers of the finny tribe with fresh oysters at all times in season.  Their meat market which is operated in connection with the store is modern in every detail and is equipped with Frigidaire cold storage apparatus, insuring their patrons of always receiving the most sanitary meats.

Upon a trip of this nature it is natural for one to become fatigued and need refreshing so we made a call upon the C.O. Terry Drug Store, the proprietor of which is familiarly known as “The Accommodating Druggist.”  Dr. Terry, himself waited upon us and true to his slogan proved to be very accommodating.  Being a very busy man dispensing cold drinks, filling prescriptions and waiting upon the trade in general, we did not get to spend as much time with him as we would have like, but a careful survey of the store convinced us that he was modern in his ideas and carried a choice line of drugs as well as druggists sundries.  Another noticeable feature was a large sign across the rear end of the store reading “Sargon” which is evidence enough within itself to show that he is the leading druggist of his section.

Just before taking leave of the little city it was our pleasure to visit the garden of Mrs. J.H.P. Johnson, which is a marvel, especially considering the dry weather.  Our observation of the garden and surroundings, convinced us that there is no danger of the family going hungry unless they should suddenly become too weak to pull up vegetables, milk a cow, kill a chicken, or clean a hog, as there was plenty of evidence that this family believes in living at home.

The above trip was an eye-opener to us, and our suggestion is that the people of Berrien County should “Know Your County Better.”

Transcription courtesy of Skeeter Parker.

Bank of Ray City, GA through Optimism and Depression

The Citizens Bank of Ray City was among the first businesses to advertise in the town’s newspaper, The Ray City News, when it began circulation in 1929.

The Citizens Bank, Ray City, GA – 1929 newspaper advertisement from the Ray City News

In a newspaper clipping from the Jan 3, 1929 issue of the Ray City News the stockholders of the Citizens Bank of Ray City were pleased with the financial reports.

In a newspaper clipping from the Jan 3, 1929 issue of the Ray City News the stockholders of the Citizens Bank of Ray City were pleased with the financial reports.

Ray City News
Ray City, GA
January 3, 1929

 Bank Stockholders Hold Annual Meet

    The stockholders of the Citizens Bank of Ray City held their annual meeting on December 18th – illegible text –
    Examination of the – illegible text – well pleased at the report.
    The same officers and directors were elected for the new year.

In 1929, the Citizens Bank of Ray City, was optimistically advertising for new depositors.

When the stock market crashed, the bank managed to remain in business.  In fact, in July of 1930, the Atlanta Constitution reported that the banks of Berrien County, including the Ray City bank were financially sound.  But by the end of December 1930 the Citizens Bank of Ray City had failed.

 MORE BANKS CLOSED IN SOUTHERN STATES
New York Times.  Dec 21, 1930.

ATLANTA, Ga., Dec. 20 (AP) – A. B. Mobley, State Superintendent of Banks, announced today his department had been asked to take over the affairs of the Union Banking Company of Douglas, operating branches at Braxton and Nichols, the Toombs County Bank at Lyons and the Citizens Bank of Ray City. Cause of the closings was not stated.

“After that bank failed other banks were opened but they all  suffered from the nation’s economic troubles and none were successful. Until, in 1949, H.P. Clements opened a private bank and named it the Bank of Ray City.  It was a state chartered bank operated by Mr. Clements and his son-in-law,  Lawson Fountain. In later years Mr. Clements was forced to retire due to ill health. ”

Bank of Ray City

Bank of Ray City

The Bank of Ray City in 1972. In 1973 the bank was acquired by the Citizens Bank of Nashville. Georgia, and is now the Ray City office of that bank. The old bank building pictured above has since been demolished.

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Bank of Ray’s Mill

The Bank of Ray’s Mill and the Bank of Milltown

In 1905, local investors including some with Ray’s Mill connections formed the Bank of Milltown.  The bank was  chartered March 14, 1905 and the bank opened for business March 21, 1906.

GOSSIP AT THE CAPITOL
Atlanta Constitution. Feb 7, 1905 pg. 7

 Application was filed with Secretary of State Philip Cook yesterday for a charter for the Bank of Milltown, at Milltown, in Berrien county. The capital stock of the new bank is to be $25,000 and the incorporators are J.V. Talley, W.L. Patton, P.T. Knight and L.J. Clements, Jr.

The Bank of Ray’s Mill was organized around 1908 with George W. Varn as president and Lewis M. Marshall as cashier. Its directors were J.H.P. Johnson, J.H.SwindleC.O. Terry, Y.F. Carter, Harmon Gaskins, and Frank Fountain. Wallace Johnson, son of J.H.P  Johnson, began working for the bank when he was fourteen years old.  Lewis M. Marshall served as the bank’s cashier until he was succeeded in the early 1920’s by John D. Luke who held the position until the bank failed during the great depression – probably around 1931.  In 1909 the bank’s name was changed to Citizens Bank of Ray City.

The Annual report of the Treasurer and State Bank Examiner of the State of Georgia for the year ending 1910, still lists the bank as the Bank of Ray’s Mill, with a capital of $15,000 dollars.  That sum would have been about $6 million in 2007 dollars.

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