Addie Hodges Hardie of Ray City, GA

Addie B. Hodges was born March 15, 1889 in Lowndes County, GA.  When she was a young woman, she moved with her family  to Hahira, GA.   Her father, Irvin “Plimp” Hodges, was one of the merchants in town. In the mercantile business he probably had contact with salesmen in the drygoods line; salesmen like Gordon Hardie. At any rate, Addie and Gordon became aquainted and, by and by, they were married.

Marriage Certificate of Gordon Vancie Hardie and Addie B. Hodges

 Gordon Vancie Hardie and Addie B. Hodges were wed on November 25, 1912 in Lowndes County, GA. Perry T. Knight, Minister of God and native of Ray’s Mill, GA  (nka Ray City), performed the ceremony.

It seems that by the time they married, Gordon had already moved to Ray City, where he had gone into business for himself. 

 The Hardies where part of the social scene in Berrrien county. Although the press didn’t get their name right in the society item below, it was just one of many errors:

Atlanta  Constitution, Feb 8, 1914, pg 8 M
Nashville (news items)

Rays Mill was well represented at the carnival last week. Misses Annie Mae Carter, Margie Dasher, Pearl Hardie Knight, Mr. and Mrs. G. V. Harvie, W. H. LuckieGeorge Norton, J. J.  and J. S. Clements and C.B . Shaw were among the visitors.

 

The year 1919 was a difficult one for the Hardies. That summer, they lost an infant boy. The babe was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

 Sometime after 1924 the Hardies purchased a big white house with a high roof, on the north side of Jones Street on the block between Ward street and Samuel Street.  The house was originally built about 1917 for Rachel and Francis Marion Shaw (See Francis Marion Shaw Historical Site by Brian Shaw).   The Hardies occupied the house for many years. They kept a big garden on the lot west of the house, on the corner of Ward and Jones Street.

Ray City, GA home built circa 1917 for Francis Marion and Rachel Horne Shaw was later the residence of Gordon V. Hardie and wife, Addie Hodges Hardie. Image courtesy of http://berriencountyga.com/

Gordon Vancie Hardie died March 27, 1937 at just 46 years old. He was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Gordon Vancie Hardie (1890-1937), Beaver Dam Cemeter, Ray City, GA

 In the 1950s, the widow Addie B. Hardie was a dear friend and neighbor to Lessie Guthrie Futch.  Lessie and Rossie Futch lived first in a small house next door to the Hardies on the east, then after 1951 directly across Jones Street, opposite the Hardie residence.  Addie Hardie was a frequent visitor to the Futch home.  Most afternoons, Mrs. Hardie would cross the street to visit with Lessie, and to have one of Lessie’s hot baked biscuits. When Lessie’s daughter happened to be visiting, she would do Mrs. Hardie’s hair.

Addie Hodges Hardie died October 9, 1972.  She was buried next to her husband at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Addie Hodges Hardie (1889-1972), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA

The Shaw/Hardie house on Jones Street was destroyed by fire in 1972, and the car shed seen in the background in the photo above was demolished in 2010. The lot where they stood is still vacant.  The Hardie’s big garden is now occupied by a modern brick house.

Related Posts:

The Marriage of John David Miley and Lessie Lee Guthrie

John David Miley, of Hahira,  and Lessie  Lee Guthrie, of Ray City, were married February 24, 1926 inValdosta, GA.  They were married at Christian Parsonage by Reverend Richard Wallace.  Mrs. Wallace served as the witness.

Lessie Guthrie was raised in Ray City and spent most of her life here. Her ancestors were among the pioneer families that settled Berrien County, and many of the Guthrie family connection still reside in the Ray City area.

Lessie Guthrie Miley and John David Miley, 1928, Brunswick, GA.

Lessie Guthrie Miley and John David Miley, 1928, Brunswick, GA.

Following their wedding, John D. Miley took a job at the A & P  Grocery, in Waycross, GA.  At the first opportunity, though, he took the Civil Service Entrance Exam, and got a position with the U.S. Postal Service working at the Post Office in Brunswick, GA.  Thereafter, John D. Miley worked with the postal service the rest of his life.  Even when he served in the military, his service was in mail delivery.

The Ray City News, Jan 3, 1929 edition mentioned, “Mrs. John D Miley of Brunswick is visiting relatives here.”

Personal mention in the Ray City News, Jan 3, 1929.

Personal mention in the Ray City News, Jan 3, 1929.

Lessie Guthrie Miley with daughter Diane Miley, circa 1934

In the early 1930’s John D and Lessie had two children, Diane and David. But by 1935,  they were experiencing marital difficulties. 

Lessie left Brunswick and took the childen to Florida. They lived for a short time with Lessie’s brothers, Sam and John Guthrie, in an apartment  in Winterhaven, FL.  John D. Miley came to see her, they reconciled, and he took his family back to Brunswick.

The marriage of Lessie Lee Guthrie and John David Miley lasted another four years.   They separated in 1939 while living in Hollywood, Florida.

John David Miley, Jr., "David", circa 1939.

 Lessie was left alone there with her two children.  Her mother-in-law, Narcissus

 

Miley, came from Hahira, GA to take them back to Georgia.  Narcissus arranged for a large railroad crate to be delivered to Lessie’s place of residence. She packed all of Lessie’s possessions, her electric appliances, clothes, everything right down to the doilies.  The railroad picked up the crate and they all rode the train together back to Hahira.  Lessie and the kids stayed with Narcissus in Hahira about a week.  Then June Guthrie, Lessie’s brother, came to get them and took them back to the Guthrie farm on Park Street, Ray City, GA.

 

Later, Lessie wrote, “We came back to Ray City on Easter Sunday, 1939.  John D. left us December 1938 – one week before Christmas.  We remained in Hollywood, until Granny Miley, went and brought us back on Easter Sunday.”

For more on the Guthrie and Miley families, and the history of Ray City, GA visit http://raycity.pbworks.com/

William J. Lamb ~ Confederate Veteran

A recently encountered photograph, taken January 1, 1908, depicts a gathering of Confederate veterans at Hahira, GA. Among them was William Joseph Lamb, who long resided in Georgia Militia District 1144, the Ray’s Mill (nka Ray City) District, Berrien County, GA.

Confederate Veterans, Hahira, Georgia, January 1, 1908  (1)  W. A. Ram, Dec 31, 1845 (2) J. W. Rouse, Aug 12, 1843  (3) H. C. Lang, July 13, 1839  (4) E. J. Williams, Oct 21, 1842  (5) J. A. Mobley, June 23, 1839  (6) M. M. Howard, Dec 19, 1848  (7) J. H. Tillman, 1842  (8)  Hardy Christian, Aug 31, 1838  (9) Jno L. Right, Dec 20, 1844  (10)  J. P. Powers, 1840  (11) M. C. Futch, Aug 20, 1836  (12)  C. H. Shaw, June 8, 1842  (13)  S. B. Dampier, Nov 18, 1835  (14)  T. A. Judge, Nov 22, 1843  (15)  J. W. Taylor, Oct 25, 1833  (16)  B. J. Sirmans, Feb 24, 1847  (17)  S. W. Register, Aug 5, 1839  (18)  A. Cowart, Dec 29, 1843  (19) J. T. Courson, Mar 22, 1848  (20)  J. M. Patterson, May 27, 1840 (21) Elbert Mathis, Oct 4, 1836  (22)   M. A. Tolar, Dec 8, 1832  (23)  J. H. King, Nov 3, 1839  (24)  G. W. Robinson, May 1, 1833  (25)  W. M. Watson, 1840  (26)  Jessie Moore, June 12, 1839   (27)  N. J. Money, Mar 28, 1845  (28)  A. Dixon, May 10, 1847  (29)  W. J. Lamb, Apr 20, 1837  (30)  Troy Thomas, Jan 13, 1833   (31)  W. W. Joyce, May 3, 1832   (32)  W. H. Green, Apr 13, 1834  (33)  W. H. Dent, Oct 12, 1844  (34)  Jas. W. Parish, Mar 2, 1847  (35) to get from photo owner  (36)  ditto (37)  ditto   (38)  Blu Sirmans, Nov 15, 1839   (39)  J. A. Lawson, July 10, 1836  (40)  J. J. Parrish, Sept 11, 1834  (41)  R. W. Roan, June 18, 1846  (42)  A. T. Tadlock, March 27, 1835  (43)  W. R. Starling, May 3, 1831  (44)  W. M. Lawson, Sept 7, 1834  (45)  W. E. Stephens, Dec 15, 1849  (46)  G. W. Powell, March 3, 1847  (47)  J. F. Barfield, July 7, 1833  (48)  W. W. Rutherford, Oct 18, 1825  (49)  J. J. Hutchinson, Oct 1, 1843  (50)  G. C. Hodges, Oct 13, 1846  (51) T. E. Swilley, Sept 22, 1843  (52)  J. I. Martin, Spt 21, 1844  (53)  E. J. Shanks, March 3, 1840  (54)  H. L. Smith, Dec 28, 1841  (55)  G. W. Stephens, Jan 8, 1833   (56)  T. A. Roberts, July 6, 1844  (57)  T. L. Wiseman, June 4, 1838  (58)  W. W. Wilkderson, June 10, 1830  (59)  H. B. Lawson, Aug 28, 1844  (60)

Confederate Veterans, Hahira, Georgia, January 1, 1908 (1) W. A. Ram, Dec 31, 1845 (2) J. W. Rouse, Aug 12, 1843 (3) H. C. Lang, July 13, 1839 (4) E. J. Williams, Oct 21, 1842 (5) J. A. Mobley, June 23, 1839 (6) M. M. Howard, Dec 19, 1848 (7) J. H. Tillman, 1842 (8) Hardy Christian, Aug 31, 1838 (9) Jno L. Right, Dec 20, 1844 (10) J. P. Powers, 1840 (11) M. C. Futch, Aug 20, 1836 (12) C. H. Shaw, June 8, 1842 (13) S. B. Dampier, Nov 18, 1835 (14) T. A. Judge, Nov 22, 1843 (15) J. W. Taylor, Oct 25, 1833 (16) B. J. Sirmans, Feb 24, 1847 (17) S. W. Register, Aug 5, 1839 (18) A. Cowart, Dec 29, 1843 (19) J. T. Courson, Mar 22, 1848 (20) J. M. Patterson, May 27, 1840 (21) Elbert Mathis, Oct 4, 1836 (22) M. A. Tolar, Dec 8, 1832 (23) J. H. King, Nov 3, 1839 (24) G. W. Robinson, May 1, 1833 (25) W. M. Watson, 1840 (26) Jessie Moore, June 12, 1839 (27) N. J. Money, Mar 28, 1845 (28) A. Dixon, May 10, 1847 (29) W. J. Lamb, Apr 20, 1837 (30) Troy Thomas, Jan 13, 1833 (31) W. W. Joyce, May 3, 1832 (32) W. H. Green, Apr 13, 1834 (33) W. H. Dent, Oct 12, 1844 (34) Jas. W. Parish, Mar 2, 1847 (35) to get from photo owner (36) ditto (37) ditto (38) Blu Sirmans, Nov 15, 1839 (39) J. A. Lawson, July 10, 1836 (40) J. J. Parrish, Sept 11, 1834 (41) R. W. Roan, June 18, 1846 (42) A. T. Tadlock, March 27, 1835 (43) W. R. Starling, May 3, 1831 (44) W. M. Lawson, Sept 7, 1834 (45) W. E. Stephens, Dec 15, 1849 (46) G. W. Powell, March 3, 1847 (47) J. F. Barfield, July 7, 1833 (48) W. W. Rutherford, Oct 18, 1825 (49) J. J. Hutchinson, Oct 1, 1843 (50) G. C. Hodges, Oct 13, 1846 (51) T. E. Swilley, Sept 22, 1843 (52) J. I. Martin, Spt 21, 1844 (53) E. J. Shanks, March 3, 1840 (54) H. L. Smith, Dec 28, 1841 (55) G. W. Stephens, Jan 8, 1833 (56) T. A. Roberts, July 6, 1844 (57) T. L. Wiseman, June 4, 1838 (58) W. W. Wilkderson, June 10, 1830 (59) H. B. Lawson, Aug 28, 1844 (60)

William J Lamb joined General Levi J. Knight’s Berrien County Minutemen,” Company C , Georgia 29th Infantry Regiment in Nashville, GA on August 1, 1861. On the 16th of May, 1862 he was appointed 3rd Sergeant of Company E, Georgia 54th Infantry Regiment. In September 1864 he was shot in the leg. He was sent to a hospital, then furloughed home. Later, Dr. H. M. Talley and Dr. M.Y. Allen, who examined William for his confederate veterans pension application, described the injury, “a gunshot wound just below the right knee, the leg was fractured and gangrene set in.” While William was recuperating at home the war ended.

1908 Photo Detail - William Joseph Lamb (1837-1908) ~ Confederate Veteran

1908 Photo Detail – William Joseph Lamb (1837-1908) ~ Confederate Veteran

Before the Civil War, William J. Lamb was one of the wealthiest men in Berrien County, with a total estate of $17,880 in the Census of 1860. In 2009 dollars that would have been about $58 million. But by 1870, the relative worth of his estate had declined by 97 percent.  By 1872, the Berrien County tax digest shows that William J. Lamb owned no land. He had $20 cash on hand and other personal property valued at $304 dollars. He employed one hand, a freedman named Morris Wilkins. By 1900, completely penniless and unable to support himself, William J. Lamb applied for and eventually received an Indigent Confederate Veteran’s Pension from the State of Georgia.

William J. Lamb passed away on June 13, 1908 just six months after the group photo above was taken. He was buried in Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, GA. (see Obituary of William J. Lamb ~ died June 13, 1908)

William Joseph Lamb (1837 – 1908). Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Related posts:

Dr. H.W. Clements and the Doctor’s Roadster

Henry Warren Clements, M.D.  (1877-1952)

Henry W. Clements was a Physician who lived and practiced in Ray City, Georgia during the early days of the town.  He was one of the many Medical Men of Ray’s Mill (now Ray City), who served the community over the years.

Henry W. Clements went into medical practice  for a short time in Rays Mill, GA after graduating from the Medical College of Georgia in 1900.  A clipping from the Tifton Gazette shows he soon moved to Hahira, and in 1901 he moved again to Lenox, GA

Dr. Henry W. Clements moves to Lenox, GA

Dr. Henry W. Clements moves to Lenox, GA. Tifton Gazette, Feb. 22, 1901

Advertisment of Dr. H. W. Clements, Physician and Surgeon. Tifton Gazette, Mar. 25, 1904.

Advertisment of Dr. H. W. Clements, Physician and Surgeon. Tifton Gazette, Mar. 25, 1904.

In 1908 Dr. Clements was admitted to the Medical Association of Georgia. The Census of 1910 places him in Lenox, GA, but newspaper mentions show he and his wife, Pauline Nelson Clements, were back in Ray City by early 1911.  Dr. Clements was a self-employed physician in general practice in Ray City.  His bookkeeper was Robert Tombs Harrell and he also employed Floyd Lafayette Blanton in farming. According to the 1920 Census, Dr. Clements owned a home in Ray City on North Street, next door to his father, Levi J. Clements.

 Dr. Clements practiced in Hahira, Lenox, and Ray City until the early 1920’s.  Transportation for these years was by horse and buggy and his stable full of horses is well known.  Prior to World War I, the second gas vehicle in Berrien County was a  Maxwell proudly owned by Dr. Clements.

The Maxwell Motor Company produced a model called the Doctor’s Roadster, marketed especially to medical men, as seen in this advertisement from The Medical World magazine.

W.P. Tittle & Co., a Nashville, GA firm from 1911 to around 1925, was the first automobile dealer in Berrien County and handled the Maxwell line of cars. The firm was owned by  W.P. Tittle, C.G. Starling, and D.D. Tittle.

With the growing popularity of the automobile, Dr. Clements found that in addition to treating the sick and delivering babies,  he was now treating accident victims.  In 1923 when his cousin, Homer Clements, broke an arm while hand cranking his car, Dr. Clements may have set the “Ford Fracture.”

Dr. H.W. Clements lived in Ray City, GA and kept his medical practice there until he moved to Adel, GA in 1922.  Adel is just 10 miles west of Ray City;  Homer could have made the trip in 1923 to get his arm treated.

On the night of January 17, 1929 Dr. Clements was called for an emergency response when Rema Sirmans was ejected from a Ford roadster in a one car accident near Sparks, Ga. No doubt, Dr. Clements treated many other automobile accident victims over the years.

Tragically, his own daughter, Hilda Clements, and son-in-law would be killed in an automobile accident at a bridge near Ray City, on December 21, 1941.

Children of Henry W. Clements and Mary Pauline Nelson (1881 – 1954):

  1. Henry G. Clements 1903 – 1948
  2. Harvey J Clements 1905 – 1927
  3. Jaunita P Clements 1913 –
  4. Fred Nelson Clements 1918 – 1987
  5. Hilda Clements 1921 – 1941

Related posts:

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