Morz Swain was Innkeeper, Blacksmith, Sheriff & Jailor of old Troupville, GA

By special request…

On August 9, 1851, A brief announcement appeared in the newspapers of the state capitol at Milledgeville, GA.  Morgan G. Swain, prominent and colorful citizen of Troupville, GA, was dead.

Obituary of Morgan G. Swain appeared Aug 19, 1851 in the Milledgeville Federal Union newspaper.

Obituary of Morgan G. Swain appeared Aug 19, 1851 in the Milledgeville Federal Union newspaper.

The Milledgeville Federal Union
August 19, 1851

DIED. – In Lowndes County, on the 9th inst., after a short but severe illness, Morgan G. Swain in 48th year of his age.

A slightly longer obituary appeared a few days later in The Albany Patriot.

Obituary of Morgan G. Swain.

Obituary of Morgan G. Swain.

The Albany Patriot
August 22, 1851

OBITUARY.
Departed this life on the 9th instant at his residence, in Lowndes county, Geo., MORGAN G. SWAIN, aged fifty years, after an illness of nine days.
He has left a wife and a large family of Children, besides an extensive circle of acquaintances to lament his loss.
Troupville, August 13, 1851.

Born in 1805 in Montgomery County, Georgia, Morgan G. Swain was one of thirteen children of Rebecca Johnston and Canneth Swain (1770-1831).  His father, Canneth Swain, was a planter of Montgomery County and served there as Justice of the Peace  from 1808 to 1812.  Swainsboro, GA was named after his uncle, Senator Stephen Swain, who served in the Georgia Assembly for more than twenty years and who introduced the bill that created Emanuel County.

About 1826, Morgan G. Swain moved with his parents to the newly created Thomas County, GA where his father had purchased land in 1825.  In addition to the property in Thomas County,  Canneth Swain owned nearly two thousand acres of land in Early and Lee counties, and herds of hogs and cattle.

On September 3, 1828 Morgan Swain married seventeen-year-old Elizabeth Wooten in Thomas County, GA.  She was a daughter of Redden Wooten and Susannah Byrd. Swain’s brother-in-law was Lasa Adams, who fought in the Indian Wars of 1836.

1828 Marriage license of Morgan Swain and Elizabeth Wooten, Thomas County, GA

1828 Marriage license of Morgan Swain and Elizabeth Wooten, Thomas County, GA

To any Judge  Justice of the Inferior Court   Justice of the peace or ordained Minister of the Gospel    Greeting   These are to authorise you to Join together in holy and sacred Matrimony Mr Morgan Swain and Miss Elizabeth Wooten for which this will be your sufficient Licence given under my hand at office this the 18th August 1828

Neill McKinnon CCC the witness    Executed on the 3rd day of September by Amelus Hughen   Minister of the Gospel    1828

Entered this the 23 December 1828

On the census records of 1830, Morgan Swain was enumerated in Thomas County next to his father-in-law, Redden Wooten. For several years the Swains made their home in Thomas County;  Morgan Swain served as 1st Lieutenant of  the Militia in the 763rd District.  But when Troupville was establish in 1838 as the county seat of Lowndes County,  the Swains moved  there to be among the town’s first residents. In Troupville, Morgan Swain set up a blacksmith shop  and  also took work as Deputy Sheriff, both trades that suited him as one of the biggest, strongest men in Wiregrass Georgia.

For five years the Swains prospered in Troupville.  While Elizabeth Swain raised their children,  Morgan Swain “became owner and operator of Swain’s Hotel in Troupville, which competed with “Uncle Billie” Smith’s hotel [Tranquil Hall] for public patronage, especially during court and muster days.”  But on June 20, 1843 Elizabeth Wooten Swain died at age 32, leaving Morgan with two young children to raise.  Elizabeth Wooten Swain was buried, it is said, in Bethel Primitive Baptist Church cemetery, where others of the Wooten family connection are interred.

About six months later, in January, 1844 Morgan Swain married a second time. On January 11, 1844, Swain married Rebecca Griffin, eldest daughter of Shadrach Griffin. Her father was a pioneer settler of Irwin County, and a road commissioner on that section of the Coffee Road which crossed over the Alapaha River. Morgan and Rebecca were married in a ceremony performed by X. Graham. The wedding was announced in The Macon Telegraph.

Wedding announcement for Morgan G. Swain and Rebecca Griffin appeared in The Macon Telegraph, Feb 20, 1844.

Wedding announcement for Morgan G. Swain and Rebecca Griffin appeared in The Macon Telegraph, Feb 20, 1844.

Morgan G. Swain operated one of the three hotels in Troupville. One was “Tranquil Hall” run by William “Uncle Billy” Smith.  The second was that operated by Jonathan Knight for eight or ten years until he moved away to Appling County about 1849.  A third hotel, situated on the town square,  was operated by Swain.

Upon the occasion of his marriage in January, 1844 Swain apparently felt it necessary to advertise his intention to continue as innkeeper. “Swain’s Hotel,” the tavern operated by Morgan G. Swain, was properly called The Jackson Hotel, and for several months in 1844 he ran this ad in the papers of the state capitol.

Jackson Hotel, Troupville, GA was operated by Morgan G. Swain.

Jackson Hotel, Troupville, GA was operated by Morgan G. Swain.

The Milledgeville Federal Union
February 6, 1844

JACKSON HOTEL
Troupville, Georgia
The subscriber respectfully informs his friends, and the public generally, that he still continues at his old stand, and feels grateful for the liberal encouragement heretofore extended to him, and assures his friends that no effort on his part, shall be wanting, to render the utmost satisfaction to those who may favor him with a call.
His Table will at all times, exhibit the best specimens of eating, the country affords.
His Stables are large and commodious – he is likewise able to oversee in person, that every care and the best of provender, is amply supplied to all animals, entrusted to him.  His terms are adapted to suit the times – very reasonable.

MORGAN G. SWAIN
Troupville, Ga., Jan. 16, 1844

Morgan Swain’s grandson, Montgomery M. Folsom, was a Wiregrass poet and historian whose writings have been featured in previous posts on this blog.  According to Folks Huxford, Folsom, a sort of grandson of old Troupville, in his series of articles entitled “Down the River” published in ‘The Valdosta Times’ in 1885, also wrote of old Troupville in an interesting manner”

‘Old Troupville! What a charming spot for the mind of the lover of reminiscent lore to contemplate! Here, semi-annually the Judge and his satellites, the jurors, litigants, court attaches, sightseers, horse-swappers, peddlers, tinklers, bummers, rowdies and all the rabble rant; all did congregate in august assemblage and solemn conclave.

* * * * *

Among those who settled in Troupville and left behind many momentous memories, was Morgan Goodgame Swain, a burly blacksmith from Emanuel, who was ever ready for a fight, frolic or a footrace. He stood six feet three and weighed over two hundred without pound of surplus flesh. As handsome as a Greek god he was gifted with herculean strength and a heart that was generous and true. He erected his forge on the bank of the Ockolockochee, and his wife took possession of the tavern. Becky, she was lord above, and Morz was lord below.

* * * * *

There, at that pile of rocks stood Morgan G. Swain’s blacksmith shop, and the rocks are the remains of his forge. Many a time and oft has he stepped out in the road and throwing off his hunting-shirt, flop his arms and crow like a game-cock “Best man in Troupville, by —–!’

Despite this zest for life, in late 1845, Morgan Swain sought to dispose of his hotel and Troupville city lots.

In November 1845, Morgan G. Swain advertised to sell the Jackson Hotel and his Troupville, GA property.

In November 1845, Morgan G. Swain advertised to sell the Jackson Hotel and his Troupville, GA property.

Albany Patriot
November 26, 1845

NOTICE

Being desirous of paying up my debts and moving into the country, I offer my possessions in the county of Lowndes, consisting of FOUR LOTS in the town of Troupville, three of which are Well Improved, and 245 Acres of Pine Land, also well improved, in the immediate vicinity of Troupville, for sale at the lowest price for which property can  be had.
    On the Town Lots now is standing, and in good repair, a Large TAVERN, suited for the accommodation of Travellers.  Purchasers, by paying a part of the price in cash,  can have their time to pay the balance.
    The above will be sold at Public Outcry, on the First Tuesday in January, if disposed of before at private sale. The house-hold and kitchen furniture will also be sold in the same manner.
MORGAN G. SWAIN
Troupville, Nov. 26, 1845

During this period Swain had continued to hold public office, serving as Justice of the Peace of 658th District of Lowndes County from 1844 to 1849, and also as the county Jailor.

In 1847 Swain’s old place, the Jackson Hotel, hosted the Lowndes County Democratic party for the purpose of selecting representatives to the gubernatorial convention and also candidates for election to the state legislature. In 1849, Swain’s further interest in politics was apparent in his involvement in the activities of the Democratic party in Lowndes county.

Morgan G. Swain was a member of the Democratic Party.

Morgan G. Swain was a member of the Democratic Party.

The Albany Patriot

Democratic Meeting in Lowndes.
Troupvill, May 6th, 1849 
   The Democratic party of Lowndes county held a meeting in the Court House today. – On motion, William Hines was called to the Chair, and – Edmondson requested to act as Secretary.  The object of the meeting was explained by Morgan G. Swain, Esq.  The following resolutions were passed:
Resolved, That this meeting appoint a committee of seven to select delegates from each district to meet the delegates from the county of Ware at David Johnson’s, Esq., on the 4th Saturday in June next, to nominate for this district a Senatorial candidate for the Legislature.
Resolved, That James Jamerson, David G. Hutchinson, William Zeigler, James Coston, Thomas B. Griffin, James C. Hodges, and Wm. L. Morgan, Esqrs. be selected delegates to the Convention in Milledgeville to nominate a Governor of the Democratic party.
Resolved, That the citizens of the different districts in this county be requested to appoint  two delegates each to meet in Troupville on the first Monday in July next, to nominate a candidate for Representative of this county to the next Legislature.
Resolved, That this meeting now adjourn.
WM. Hines, Chm’n
–Edmonson, Sec’y

As given above, Morgan G. Swain lived a short but prominent life in old Troupville, GA and there he died on August 9, 1851.  It is said he was buried in the cemetery of Bethel Primitive Baptist Church, Brooks County, Ga.

His father-in-law, Shadrach Griffin, served as administrator of his estate.

1822 Legal advertisement for administration of the estate of Morgan G. Swain, appeared in The Albany Patriot, August 22, 1851.

1822 Legal advertisement for administration of the estate of Morgan G. Swain, appeared in The Albany Patriot, August 22, 1851.

The Albany Patriot
 August 22, 1851.

Georgia Lowndes County.
Whereas, Shadrick Griffin applies to me for Letters of Administration on the estate of Morgan G. Swain, late of said county dec’d.
     These are therefore to cite, summons and admonish all persons interested, to be and appear at my office within the time prescribed by law, to shew cause (if any) why said letters may not be granted.
     Given under my hand at office, this, 16th day of August, 1851.
DUNCAN SMITH, cco.
August 22, 1851.

Swain’s widow applied in July 1852, for guardianship of the “minors and orphans” of the deceased.  Dr. Henry Briggs, Ordinary of the Lowndes Court advertised the application in The Milledgeville Southern Recorder.  Dr. Briggs was one of the first doctors to take up residence in Troupville, GA.

Rebecca Swain applied for guardianship of "the minors and orphans of Morgan G. Swain."

Rebecca Swain applied for guardianship of “the minors and orphans of Morgan G. Swain.”

Milledgeville Southern Recorder
July 13, 1852

 GEORGIA, LOWNDES COUNTY
     Whereas Rebecca Swain applies to me for letters of Guardianship of the persons and property of the minors and orphans of Morgan G. Swain, late of said county, deceased –
     These are, therefore, to cite, summon and admonish all persons interested to be and appear at my office on or before the first Monday in September next, and show cause, if any exist, why said letters of Guardianship should not be granted.
     Given under my hand this  1st July, 1852.
H. BRIGGS, Ordinary L. C.
July 6, 1852

Shadrach Griffin, Swain’s father-in-law and administrator of his estate, continued with the disposal of his property and the conclusion of his affairs.

Administrator's Sale: estate of Morgan G. Swain

Administrator’s Sale: estate of Morgan G. Swain

The Albany Patriot
February 6, 1853

Administrator’s Sale.
Georgia, Lowndes County.

Will be sold at the late residence of Morgan G. Swain, late of said county dec’d, on Thursday the 1st day of April next, all the personal property, consisting of cattle, horses, hogs, stock cattle, and household and kitchen furniture, and a great many other articles too tedious to mention.  Sale will continue until all is sold.  Terms of sale made known on the day.
SHADRACH GRIFFIN, Adm’r
February 6, 1853.
——————————————-
All persons indebted to the estate of Morgan G. Swain, late of Lowndes county dec’d, will come forward and make payment – and all those having claims against said estate will render them in according to law.
SHAD’H GRIFFIN, Adm’r.
February 6, 1853

From the King’s Tree to Ray City: Family of JHP Johnson

Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson of Ray City, GA

For more than forty years Joseph Henry Pascal “Joe” Johnson was a resident and merchant of Ray City, GA. The Johnson’s were among the pioneer families of Wiregrass Georgia, and among colonists who settled in the 1700s at the King’s Tree in South Carolina. His father was a captain with the Confederate States Army. His grandfather fought in the Indian Wars and was a Major General of the State Militia.  His great grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and his great great grandfather was a South Carolina colonist in 1732.

Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson, tintype. Image courtesy of Julie Hutson.

Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson, tintype, as a boy in Clinch County, GA. Image courtesy of Julie Hutson.

◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊

SON OF CAPTAIN ROWAN BURNETT JOHNSON

JHP “Joe” Johnson was born February 22, 1859 in DuPont, GA. He was a son of Rowan Burnett Johnson and Caroline Amanda Floyd (1842 – 1872). His mother died when Joe was about 13 years old. His father was remarried to a widow, Emaline Dame Clifton.

Rowan Burnett Johnson and Emaline Dame Johnson, father and step-mother of J.H.P. Johnson. Image courtesy of Julie Hutson.

Rowan Burnett Johnson and Emaline Dame Johnson, father and step-mother of J.H.P. Johnson. Image courtesy of Julie Hutson.

Memoirs of Georgia” Vol. I, Pg 500 Southern Historical Association, 1895

Rowan B. Johnson, planter, Dupont, Clinch Co., Ga., was born in Lowndes county, Nov. 29, 1830. Three years afterward his father moved to Ware, now Clinch county. He was raised on the plantation, and has devoted himself to agriculture all his life. His education was limited to such as could be obtained at the common schools of the county. When only sixteen years of age he was elected captain of the militia – District 1280 – at a time when it was regarded as a local distinction; and in 1850 was elected a justice of the peace. In 1862 he enlisted in Company B, Second Georgia battalion, and was made first lieutenant. In 1863 he joined the Sixth Georgia regiment, Western division, was commissioned captain of Company I, and served through the war. Returning from the war he resumed farming, and was soon afterward elected a justice of the inferior court, and served a term of four years. In 1892 he was again chosen to represent Clinch county in the General Assembly and as a democrat defeated his populist opponent by and overwhelming majority – more than doubled him. In 1884 he was nominated to represent Clinch county in the General assembly and defeated his opponent by a large majority. Two years later he was again a candidate, and was defeated by a small majority; but in 1869 he was elected to fill the unexpired term of Hon. James P. Mattox (deceased), showing that the people appreciate his ability and services, and have confidence in him as a faithful custodian of their interests. While in the general assembly he was a member of the committees on agriculture, counties and county matters, military affairs and penitentiary. These frequent political successes testify to the strong hold he has on the confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens. Mr. Johnson has been married three times. His first wife was Miss Aleph, daughter of John Tomlinson, who died in 1862. For his second wife he married Miss Amanda, daughter of Jason Floyd, who died in February, 1870. He next married Mrs. Emeline (nee Dame), widow of William H. Clifton, and daughter of George Dame. He is a master Mason, and a prominent member of the Primitive Baptist church.

Rowan B. Johnson was a devout Primitive Baptist. In 1859 he deeded the land for the site of Prospect Church.The church is situated about four miles north of DuPont, GA. This church was constituted January 22, 1859. Rowan B. Johnson died on 19 June 1904 at age 73. He was buried at Prospect Church Cemetery.

◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊

GRANDSON OF MAJOR GENERAL DAVID JOHNSON, JR.

JHP Johnson’s grandfather was Major General David Johnson, Jr., of the Georgia State Militia. He fought in the Indian Wars of 1836 and raised five sons who fought in the Civil War, including JHP’s father, Rowan B. Johnson.

Nancy "Mary Ann" Burnett and Major General David Johnson, Jr. were grandparents of Joseph Howard Pascal Johnson, of Ray City, GA.

Nancy “Mary Ann” Burnett and Major General David Johnson, Jr. were grandparents of Joseph Howard Pascal Johnson, of Ray City, GA.

The following information on General David Johnson, Jr, Grandfather of JHP Johnson, is adapted from the Miles Files of the Virginia Eastern Shore Library:

Major General David Johnson, Jr. was born on 29 January 1804 at Bulloch Co, GA. He was born in Bulloch County, now Emanuel County, Georgia, the seventh child of eleven born to Martha Hardeman and David Johnson (R.S.). He grew up on the Fifteen Mile Creek, waters of the big Ohoopee River. When he was 20 years old he moved with his father and family to what is now Clinch County, GA. They lived there for about three years when they moved to Leon County, FL, then a territory. After helping his father get settled in Leon County, he moved back to Irwin County, now Lowndes County, in 1828. He married circa 1828 and settled near where Valdosta now stands. He married Nancy ‘Mary Ann’ Burnett, daughter of John and Molsy Sheppard Burnett. They moved back to Ware, now Clinch County, GA and lived there the remainder of his life. He fought through the Indian War of 1836 and won a Commission of Captain. He was noted for his coolness and bravery. Captain David Johnson’s Brigade of Georgia Militia was ordered into Federal Service of the United States by Governor Charles S. McDonald from the first day of November to the thirty-first day of December 1834 [1839?]. He was commissioned Major General of the 2nd Brigade, 6th Division of the State Militia on 16 December 1850. He resigned 22 February 1861. He felt very strongly over his failure to keep the Militia under his command active although the same condition existed all over Georgia in the State Militia, so when the Civil War and possible invasion seemed imminent and the State Militia was not ready for the emergency, General Johnson felt like he was partly to blame, which of course was not true. General Johnson lost two sons in the Civil War; Private Bryant Johnson, Company H (Thomas County Volunteers), 29th Georgia Infantry, died March 11, 1862 of measles and pneumonia in the hospital at Savannah,GA; and Private William S. Johnson, Company G, Clinch Volunteers, 50th Georgia Regiment, died on May 22, 1864 from gun shot wounds in a hospital at Stanton, VA. His other three sons served also: Captain Rowan Burnett Johnson, Company J, 11th Georgia Cavalry; Lieutenant David Hardeman Johnson, 11th Georgia Cavalry; and Private Joseph Burton Johnson in Company H (Thomas County Volunteers), 29th Georgia Infantry. General Johnson survived the war and lived until he was 77. An article in The Valdosta Times on 20 May 1876 reported the General accidently shot himself in his right hand and left knee after returning from a hunt. The Valdosta Times of 23 April 1881 reported his death on 9 April 1881. “He left an aged wife, six children and a host of devoted friends to mourn his departure to that other world. The writer knew him well and knew him to possess a heart filled with the milk of human kindness and a head stored with that ripeness of judgment.” Maj. Gen. David Johnson Jr. was buried at Fender Cemetery, Lanier Co, GA

◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊

GREAT GRANDSON OF DAVID JOHNSON, REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIER

The following information on David Johnson, Revolutionary Soldier  and great  grandfather of Joseph Henry Pascal Johnson, is adapted from the Miles Files of the Virginia Eastern Shore Library:

David Johnson (R.S.) was born in 1765 at Lorens Co, SC. It is said that his grandfather, David Johnson, was among a colony of 40 Scotch-Irish families under the leadership of Roger Gordon who settled near on the on Black River at “the King’s Tree,” South Carolina in 1732. This colony came up the Black River and disembarking from their vessel at Brown’s Ferry, blazed their way through the forests along what is now the Kingstree-Georgetown road to the King’s tree. These were the first settlers in Williamsburg Township. (Page 10, 21-22, History of Williamsburg.) The greater number of these families had lived in Ireland for many years before coming to America. They had migrated from England and Scotland to Ireland on account of fair promises on the part of the English King. David Johnson, born ca 1760-65, served in the Revolutionary War under Colonel Philemon Waters troops, Colonel Middleton’s Regiment, and General Sumter’s Brigade for 10 months until the end of the war. (See Stub Entries to Endents for Revolutionary War Claims, Book L-N No. 512 Lib. M.) His signature was compared to a bond in Bulloch County Court, 1810 term of Superior Court. Hustus Studstill and Josiah Sirmans were indicted in a case (later dismissed) and David Johnson and Jonathan Studstill were sureties. This was an original signature on the bond and it was the same as signature on Indent Record for Revolutionary War. David Johnson (R.S.) married Martha Hardman, daughter of Capt. Thomas Hardyman (R.S.) and Elizabeth (—–), in 1792 at Effingham Co, GA.The Hardymans (Hardeman) came from Virginia to South Carolina, St. David’s Parish of old Cheraw. Elizabeth Johnson, David’s sister, married Joseph Hardman, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Hardaman about 1781. Page 245 of “History of the Old Cheraws” by Rev. Alexander Gregg, DD shows William Johnson, Ensign, Captain Thomas Hardyman, and Ensign Joseph Hardyman in September 1775 being commissioned as Officers in Colonel Powell’s Regiment of Militia for duty in the Revolutionary War. David and Martha Hardaman Johnson settled on Fifteen Mile Creek which was a part of the Big Ohoopee River in Bulloch County, now Emanuel County. They settled there about 1794 after their first land grant from Washington County, now Emanuel County. The census for 1840 shows David and Martha Johnson in Emanuel as follows: 2 males under age 10, 2 males age 10-16, 1 male over age 45, 1 female under age 10, 1 female over age 45, 2 female slaves & 2 male slaves. About 1823, David and Martha Johnson sold out in Emanuel County and moved to what is now Clinch County, GA. After a few years they moved to Leon County, Florida, acquiring property there January 31, 1827. They are included in the 1830 census of Leon County, Florida as follows: 2 males age 15-20, 1 male age 60-70, 2 male slaves under age 10, 1 male slave age 10-24, 1 male slave age 36-55, 3 female slaves age 10-24. David Johnson died in Leon County, Florida on April 14, 1834 and Martha died March 23, 1837 in Leon County, Florida. They are both buried in a cemetery on his home place in Leon County, Florida. There are no markers on their graves. David made a will on 19 March 1834 at Leon Co, FL:

I, David Johnson, being of sound mind, but in low state of health; and knowing that all men must dye; do this day freely give in this deed to the heirs of my beloved son Young Johnson after my death a certain Negro woman by the name of Lucy, her children Neis, Peter, Moses & Hanner and her increases after this, they are to be kept by him after my death by the said Young Johnson. Moreover, I do give and bequeath to the said Young Johnson all my dwelling house and kitchen furniture and working tools, also five cows and calves. I also do give & bequeath a certain Negro man Clint and a feather bed and furniture belonging to said bed to my beloved son Joseph Johnson after my death. I do also give and bequeath a certain yellow Negro woman called Dinah to my beloved daughter Martha Sirman after my death. I do also give and bequeath a certain Negro woman called Flora to my beloved son David Johnson after my death. I do further give and bequeath the remainder of my beloved children all of the remainder of my stock of cattle after my beloved son Young Johnson gets his five cows and calves out of my stock. I do give and bequeath the above named cattle to my beloved daughters Risa Register, Amelia Wilks, Lavina Mosely and Mary Jones. I have already given as much as I do conceive to be right to my other two beloved children John A. Johnson and Elizabeth Rich. Witt: Allen Skipper, Benjamin Skiper & Nathan Powell.

A daughter of David Johnson, R.S.,  was Martha Johnson who married Lowndes County pioneer Benjamin Sirmans.

◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊

GREAT GREAT GREAT GRANDSON OF DAVID JOHNSON, COLONIST OF SOUTH CAROLINA

David Johnson, it is said, came to South Carolina and settled in 1732 at the King’s Tree, near the Black River.

 Detail of Sam Cook's 1773  map of South Carolina showing the location of Kingstree.

Detail of Sam Cook’s 1773 map of South Carolina showing the location of Kings Tree.

THE KING’S TREE AT WILLIAMSBURG, SC

Williamsburg, named after William of Orange, was one of eleven townships ordered by King George II in 1730 meant to develop the “back country” of the Carolina Province. The township was a part of Craven County, one of the original four counties that encompassed present South Carolina. Williamsburg Township then included most of the present Pee Dee region. The township consisted 20,000 acres (80 km²) and was located in front of the Black River. It was later divided and became a number of separate counties, including present Williamsburg County, South Carolina. A white pine tree on the Black River was marked by early surveyor with the King’s Arrow to claim it for the King. The tree was referred to as “The King’s Tree,” and became the center of the new township. Kingstree eventually became the chief town of Williamsburg township. In 1732 a colony of forty Scots-Irish led by Roger Gordon came up the river by boat and settled in the vicinity of the King’s Tree. They were poor Protestants who had come from northern Ireland. They had settled there seeing a better life than in Scotland, before migrating to America.