1898 Clippings from the 3rd Georgia Regiment, US Vols at Camp Northen

Camp Northen, Griffin County, GA was one of several camps where Georgia troops mobilized for the Spanish American War. Camp Northen was the site where the 3rd Georgia Regiment, U.S. Volunteers was organized and mustered in.

Several men of Berrien County, GA enlisted in Company D of the 3rd Georgia Regiment including Walter A. Griner, Carl R. O’Quinn, Pythias D. Yapp, Zachary T. Hester, W. Dutchman Stephens, Samuel Z.T. Lipham, James M. Bridges, Charles A. Courson, Love Culbreath, George C. Flowers, James L. Jordan and George A. Martin.

Spanish-American War enlistment record of Carl R. O'Quinn, Nashville, GA

Spanish-American War enlistment record of Carl R. O’Quinn, Nashville, GA

While the Third Regiment, U.S. Volunteers were training at Camp Northen numerous items were reported in state and local newspapers. A few clipping are presented below:

Atlanta Constitution
June 17, 1898

CALL ON THE WAY FROM WASHINGTON

Governor Notified That It Was Mailed to Him Yesterday

Five New Georgia Majors

Captain Willcoxon and Lieutenant Spence are Made Majors.

Griffin Soldiers Kick About Water

Soldiers Have to Boil It Before Using It for Drinking Purposes – Many Improvements

The call for Georgia’s third regiment of volunteers was issued and mailed from Washington yesterday and it will be received by Governor Atkinson today. The governor received telegraphic information that the adjutant general had given his assurance that the call would be mailed yesterday afternoon. The new regiment will consist of 1,336 men, rank and file…

Troops May not Go to Griffin
The Third Georgia Regiment may not be rendezvoused at Griffin. The water at Camp Northen is said to be impure and the soldiers, it is said, are complaining about it. Governor Atkinson is averse to sending the men to the camp unless better provision is made for their health and welfare, he says. The waterworks are at the bottom of a long slant, on which are situated the sinks for the various companies, and the officers say the water seeps through the refuse and gives the drinking water a bad taste. The governor stated yesterday that it is necessary to boil the water at Camp Northen before drinking it…

 

The Macon telegraph.
July 12, 1898

Quiet at Camp Northen
Recruits Are Coming in Slowly—News , From About Griffin.

Griffin, Go., July 11—Camp Northen is not presenting a very busy scene, although recruits have come in in squads daily. A number of them have stood the examination and the only waiting to be mustered in. The only incident of camp so far has been the reported loss of two watches, and steps have been taken to locate the offenders and secure the property if possible. The committee to secure an emergency fund for the boys in case of sickness was out today -under Mayor W. D. Davie, and met with good success in the short time they were canvassing. It is predicted that the fund will steadily grow. The recruits now in camp are a very quiet set and spend but little of their time in the city- Some few of them are beginning to feel a little home-sick on account of their inactivity.

 

Savannah morning news.
July 14, 1898

GEORGIA’S THIRD REGIMENT.
The Men at Camp Northen Gaining in Proficiency Daily.

Griffin, Ga., July 15.—A few moments spent at Camp Northen will readily convince one of the fact that Georgia will soon send another regiment of her sons to the front in the line of battle, or they will soon be ready for that duty. The men are now drilling from four to six hours each day, and when all are upon the parade ground in squads of twelve or twenty they show off to a decided advantage, and one can readily see front day to day the improvement. Camp has been established, and Col. Candler issues his orders for the day each morning to the adjutant. Of course the orders are not of the nature to command a regiment, but are strict and enforced. Guard mount is had each afternoon at 5:45 o’clock, when a detail from each company is accepted to serve guard during the night. Many of the men have never seen guard duty before, and interesting and laughable incidents are the result of their first lessons. A post office has been established upon the ground and those writing letters to the soldiers should direct them: “Third Regiment United States Infantry, Camp Northern” No complaint is heard from any source regarding the fare, and although the men have been on army rations for several days they knew before hand what they would have to eat, and are not kicking about it. New recruits are constantly arriving and it is hoped the regiment will soon be ready for mustering in. All the staff and the officers will soon be upon the ground, and then things will take a decided change for a more military appearance.

 

Thomasville Times
July 16, 1898

 Rev. D. H. Parker and family left last Tuesday, the former to assume his duties as chaplain of the 3rd Georgia Regiment of Volunteers (Immunes) and his family to reside in Thomasville during his absence in the army. Our city regretted to give up Dr. Parker and his family, and the best wishes of all go with them. – Bainbridge Search Light

 

Thomasville Times
July 16, 1898

The Duty of Georgians. Georgia has responded nobly and promptly, to the call for troops heretofore, and she will do now that another call is made. Southern Georgia, the Wiregrass region, has done her share, and it will continue to respond so long as there is a demand for troops. Lieutenant Pruett of the Third Georgia Regiment is recruiting in this section, and an opportunity is thus given all who are willing to enlist to do so. There may be plenty of fighting to do, or peace may soon be declared. In any event we hope this section will show up with its full quota. The third regiment, with Col. John Candler at the head, and a splendid line of officers, will make history for Georgia if called into action. There will be no better regiment in the army. We hope Lieut. Pruett will meet with the success he deserves in recruiting for the third regiment. He is engaged in a noble and patriotic work, and should be encouraged in every possible way.

 

Thomasville Times
July 16, 1898

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.

Santiago Survivors Pass Through Thomasville. Yesterday afternoon’s 2:25 train from Florida contained three survivors of the battle in front pf Santiago two weeks ago. They were Capt. Torrey and Lieut. Purdey, of the Sixth U. S. Infantry, and Lieut. Spence, of the Sixteenth U. S. Infantry. All were wounded in the terrible fight on San Juan heights. Capt. Torrey was shot through the leg, Lieut. Purdey through the thigh and Lieut. Spence had wounds in the leg and in the left hand. None of the wounds are serious and all of the officers were able to walk about.
Having been apprised of the coming of Capt. Torrey and Lieut. Purdey, a few of our patriotic citizens prepared a nice dinner for the gentlemen, added to which was some choice wines, fruits and flowers. Quite a number of people went to the depot to see the officers and as as the train stopped the Pullman in which they were riding was besieged by the crowd, all anxious to shake the hands of the gallant men who had made such a brave assault upon the Spanish stronghold. The officers, though surprised, were delighted at the attention bestowed upon them and were profuse in their expressions of gratitude. They were kept so busy shaking bauds that it was impossible to obtain an interview as to the situation around Santiago, but enough was gathered from their remarks to justify the statement that there is plenty of hard fighting to be done on the island yet, and many a brave American will yet be pierced with the deadly Spanish bullets.
Capt. Torrey and Lieut. Purdey, stated above, belong to the Sixth Infantry, from Fort Thomas, Ky., the first regiment that passed through Thomasville on the way to the front. It will be remembered that this regiment spent several hours in the city and that almost the whole town turned out to see them and the soldiers were fairly covered with flowers. On one of the cars was chalked the following sign: “The Fighting Sixth. We go to Avenge the  Murder of our Gallant Sailors.”
How well they have done this the story of the battle tells. The Sixth was in the thickest of the fight all the way through and lost more men probably than any other regiment. Capt. Torrey and Lieut. Purdey were on their way to Fort Thomas, where they will remain until they recover from their wounds, when they will rejoin their regiment.
The gentlemen who prepared the reception for Capt. Torrey and Lieut. Purdey regret very much that they were not apprised of the fact that Lieut. Spence was on the same train, so that they might have extended tho same courtesy to him.
Lieut. Spence is a South Georgia boy, a native of our sister county, Mitchell, and it is greatly regretted by the committee that they were in ignorance of his coming. It was not known by thorn that he was on board until after they had called upon the officers of the Sixth, by which time he had taken a carriage and gone up town. He remained here until the five o’clock freight left, on which he went to join his family in Camilla. During his stay here he was the center of attraction. Crowds followed him from place to place and if he answered one question be answered a thous and. He talked interestingly of the battle and the bravery of the American troops, but said he was glad to once more press American soil.
Lieut. Spence has recently been appointed a Major in the Third Georgia Regiment of Volunteers by Gov. Atkinson, and it is very likely that after he recovers he will remain here with his new command. He is a graduate of West Point and a fine officer.

 

Macon telegraph.
July 19, 1898

Recruits Come Into Camp Northern

Griffin, Ga., July 18.—The companies have all been mustered in at Camp Northen and the regiment is about half completed, with new recruits coming in each day.

 

Savannah morning news.
July 19, 1898,

COL. RAY’S IMMUNES.
Mustering in of Men Continues at Camp Northern
Griffin, Ga., July 18.—There is little of interest in Camp Northen now. The regular routine work Is accomplished each day with no difficulties. Mastering In recruits continues from day to day. There are about 100 men now in camp to be mustered in, but it will possibly lie some days before the necessary papers will be received. Most of these are minors, and Col. Candler will not consent to take any until full consent is given by their parents. Capt. Henry Kolshorn arrived this morning from Savannah, bringing several men with him. Capt. Kolshorn intends to have an ideal company, and there is no doubt of the fact that his intentions are sure to materialize, which will place his command at the top of the column. Capt. Gilbert of Albany has the largest company in camp, and is confident he will secure his full quota of men this week. He is a born gentleman, and a man of sterling integrity. His company is considered to be the best drilled one in camp, and strange to say, all except a very few were raw recruits who knew nothing of military life prior to their enlistment. The soldiers are being issued their uniforms as they are mustered in. They are not having the trouble in securing a good fit in clothing that the other regiments experienced.

 

Savannah Morning News. 
July 22, 1898

The case of Private Spence Hutchins of the Georgia Volunteer Artillery is not without a suggestion of humor. He was found guilty of the larceny of two lemons and a small quantity of sugar, probably taken in a moment of thoughtlessness and was sentenced to thirty days at hard labor. The sentence, however, was disapproved. The order is as follows: “Private Spence Hutchins, Light Battery A, Georgia Artillery, United States Volunteers, having boon tried by a general court martial convened at Camp Northern, Griffin, Ga., and found guilty of the larceny of two lemons and a quantity of sugar valued at 5 cents, in violation of the sixty-second article of war, was sentenced to hard labor for a term of thirty days. The sentence is disapproved. Private Hutchins will be returned to duty.”

 

Newnan Herald and Advertiser
July 22, 1898

Camp Northern

As Newman and Coweta county are quite liberally represented here, allow me a bit of space in your valuable sheet to give our friends at home an idea of how Uncle Sam’s pets, (the Third Georgia regiment, U. S. Vols are getting along. We have been in camp about two weeks, and the regiment now numbers something over 700 men. A few days ago the boys donned Uncle Sam’s war clothes, and a more ferocious set of Spaniard annihilators would be hard to find. The boys are becoming very anxious to get off to the war, but according to the best information obtainable it will be near the first of October before we leave Georgia. In the meantime we will undergo the seasoning process, which, according to military opinion, is so essential to the’making of a good, hardy soldier. It is surprising how the men are taking to military training. Most of our men, who knew nothing of the manual of arms when they came here, are now quite ‘proficient in the use of the gun. By the time the regiment fills up, (which will be pretty soon,) the men will be quite well drilled, and ready for the fray. We need about forty more men, and as Coweta and adjoining counties have furnished two-thirds of those we have, we confidently expect them to keep up the enlistment in the same proportion. We have many assurances from the farmer boys that they will join us as soon as they “lay-by” their crops. This, according to our judgment, is the proper thing to do, as they can make $18 per month, board and clothing included. With reference to board, clothing and bedding, they are good, and the boys enjoy them. According to newspaper reports we are not likely to see much campaign service, as they indicate an early ending of hostilities. In that event the probabilities are that our regiment will do garrison duty in one of the islands—Cuba, Porto Rico, or the Philippines. Our boys are fine specimens of prohibitionists. The “thirst parlors” here are conspicuous by their absence; and the “blind tiger” skulks in his lair since the advent of Col. Candler into these precincts. Col. Candler caught one of the brutes in flagrante delictu, and proceeded forthwith to put him through a course of sprouts.
Soldier Lad

Near Griffin, July 19th.

 

Americus Times-Recorder.
July 31, 1898

CANDLER OPPOSED TO PEACE.

Colonel of the Bloody Third is Anxious for Gore.
From indications at present there will be no need for the services of the regiment now organizing at Camp Northern, and the American soldier boys, as well as others there, may soon be ordered back to more peaceful pursuits if pending peace negotiations are pushed to a successful end. In the meantime, however, Colonel Candler, of the “Bloody Third” still sniffs Spanish gore from afar, and if correctly quoted is anxious that there shall be no end of the war until he can distinguish himself upon the field of death and carnage. The people of Georgia, however, will not coincide with Colonel Candler of the Bloody Third in his views. They are willing for him to achieve glory and fame, but not at the terrible cost of the lives of their sons who bravely responded to the call of arms to defend their country, now that there is no apparent need for such a sacrifice. Colonel Candler should curb his martial spirit, and if white-winged peace is to hover again over the land, resume the seat upon the bench which he failed to resign, and win additional laurels there instead of amid the blood and carnage of battle.

 

The Macon telegraph.
August 02, 1898

SOLDIERS TEAR DOWN FENCES.
Much Complaint Around Camp Northen—News Notes From Griffin.
Griffin, Ga., Aug. 1 —There Is considerable complaint by the citizens over what is claimed to be depredations by soldiers now stationed at Camp Northern. At first these were only such slight offenses as taking a few vegetables or fruit from where there was plenty. On good authority it is stated that panels of fence have been pulled down, and where this sort of vandalism could not be successfully accomplished, palings by the dozen were ripped off. It is impossible to locate just who the offenders are.

 

Savannah Morning News.
August 2, 1898

CANDLER’S RECRUITS.
Colonel Expects Regiment to Have Its Full Quota This Week.
Griffin, Gay, Aug. 1 —The heavy rains of the last few days have greatly interfered with the afternoon drills and dress parade at Camp Northern Sunday afternoon, as the troops were forming on the parade grounds, a heavy rain and thunder storm was an unwelcomed guest, and before the troops could be formed in line and dismissed by Col. Candler every man was wet through and through. But little complaint is heard about the rains, for they cool off the atmosphere and make things more comfortable. Many of the companies are filling up rapidly, and it is believed that all, except possibly one or two companies, will be full by Saturday. Capt. W. W. Davis’ will be the first company to muster in its full quota of men. He had ninety-seven men to-day, and more than twenty more arrived in the afternoon, who will be mustered In tomorrow. The band now has eighteen well-selected men. Col. Candler says the other six will be in camp before Sunday. Mr. Pollard, the band leader, is instructing the men under him, and is greatly encouraged at their aptness. Col. Candler has about completed arrangements to secure a set of fine band Instruments from the City Council of Americus, and expects them Wednesday. Several days ago nine men dropped out when they went to take the oath, and returned to their homes. This morning Col. Candler received a telegram from two of them asking to be taken back, stating they were under the influence of liquor before and now regretted their rash act. The officers won new laurels to-day at an elegant dinner. It was a most elegant affair and greatly enjoyed by a number of ladies. Capt. Kolshorn came up from Savannah Sunday morning, bringing several recruits with him. He returned home this morning, greatly encouraged with the progress being made by his men. Spalding county Superior Court was called to order at its regular session this morning by Judge M. W. Reck. Judge Beck has been fulfilling his duties in camp for several days, but is now holding court, which will probably not last longer than one week.

 

The Houston home journal.

August 04, 1898, Image 3

Lieut C. E. Gilbert spent last Sunday with the Third Georgia Regiment volunteers at Camp Northern, Griffin. The regiment lacks about 200 of being full, and Lieut Gilbert is still seeking volunteers, with headquarters at Fort Valley. The work of recruiting progresses slowly, and many of the volunteers have failed to pass the physical examination, ” which is very rigid. 

 

Savannah Morning News
August 09, 1898

LIEUT. SPENCE AT GRIFFIN.
Gallant Georgian Takes Up His Duties at the Camp.
Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 13.—R. H. L. Spence, the gallant Georgian who was wounded in the battle of Santiago, and who has been appointed major by Gov. Atkinson, entered upon his new duties to-day when the fourth company of the Third Georgia Regiment was mustered in at Camp Northern. Mr. Spence is a native of Georgia and married a Georgia lady, Miss Underwood of Camilla. He is a kinsman of Judge W. N. Spence of the Albany circuit. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1892, and his promotion from second lieutenant to major follows closely his first experience in battle. The Third Georgia is the only regiment in this state which has an officer who bears the scars of the present war. The acting adjutant general, Col. W. G. O’Bear, states that at the last reports there were 932 men in camp at Griffin. He thinks there are more than that number there to-day. The four companies which have been mustered into service are those of Capt. W. W. Davies, Capt. A. J. Burr, Jr., Capt. J. S. Powell and Capt. H. J. Stewart.

 

Savannah Morning News
August 9, 1898

GOOD WORK AT CAMP NORTHERN
Companies Making Good Progress in Their Military Duties.
Griffin, Ga„ Aug. 8  — Camp Northern is daily showing an improvement in its military discipline. The companies are fast filling up and being mustered in. Maj. Marcus W. Beck was to-day mustered in and took charge of his battalion. The Third Regiment band is fast filling up, now having 18 musicians enrolled. Prof. C. O. Pollard, chief musician, is busy instructing the men who are making a fine showing for the time they have been on duty. Edward Griggs of Dawson, has been appointed second principal musician and is sparing no pains in his effort to bring the band up to a high standard. H. P. Dane, principal musician, left this afternoon for Americus to purchase a set of instruments from the band there. There is not a man in camp who deserves more credit for the excellent work the regiment is doing that Adjt. W. O. D. Rockwell of Savannah. Lieut. Kimbrough of Capt. Burr’s company, also deserves special mention. He has been offered the appointment of adjutant of Beck’s battalion, and says he will probably accept. Capt. Joe Gilbert of Albany, was officer of the day and discharged his duty in a most satisfactory way, and received several compliments front the staff. 

 

Savannah Morning News.
August 18, 1898

DON’T WANT TO MUSTER OUT.
THIRD REGIMENT LIKELY TO BE FULL BY FRIDAY.
Grave Fears That an Order Will Be lssued Mustering Out the Men—A Midnight Meeting of Officers to Devise Some Plan of Holding Together the Regiment—Capt. Kolshorn’s Company to Be Mustered in This Morning—Strict Rules Enforced.
Griffin, Ga., Aug. 17.—Camp Northern now has the largest regiment of men ever encamped upon this beautiful site before. It is believed the Third Regiment will be full by Friday. The officers and men are evidently entertaining grave fears of the possibility of being mustered out of service, now that the war is over. Although every item is closely guarded against the newspapers, it is known that a called meeting of every commissioned officer in camp was held at Col. Candler’s quarters at 12 o’clock last night to discuss the proper course to pursue to prevent the order for disbanding the regiment. What was done at this meeting could not be learned, but it is known that Col. Candler was in communication with the war department all day and that recruits were being rushed to the camp as rapidly as possible. Many private consultations between the colonel and officers were held during the day. Some wished to petition the war department to be sent to Santiago, while others would go anywhere in the world rather than disband, but Col. Candler would allow no petition of any nature to be circulated. Only five men to each company are allowed passes from the grounds each day. This goes rather hard on the men, who have been in the habit of visiting our city each night and much complaining is heard. But that is the order and it must be obeyed. Seventy-two guards are now stationed around the grounds during the day and double this number during the night. This makes it next to an impossibility for one to run the lines. The men. however, are making the best of this, and always spend their idle moments In learning tactics in their company street. Tuesday afternoon the entire regiment went on a long march. They were headed by Col Candler and staff and marched to Experiment and back. The men stood the trip well, and are anxious for another. Capt. Kolshorn has been in camp several days from Savannah, and with his full company will be mustered in tomorrow morning. Capt. Gilbert has a company of well selected men, all of fine specimen and well-drilled. The regimental band is now furnishing the music for the regiment, and is doing remarkably well for a new organization.

 

Savannah Morning News
August 20, 1898

THIRD REGIMENT FULL UP
Mustering In Exercise to be Witnessed by  Gov. Atkinson.

Griffin, Ga., Aug. 19.— The Third Georgia Regiment has secured more than its quota of men and will he mustered into the service of the United States to-morrow, which will be an important day at Camp Northern. Gov. Atkinson and his staff will come down and be present when the regiment is mustered in. They will be accompanied by a delegation from the Ladies Relief Association and the Army and Navy League, who will present the regiment with two beautiful flags. Among the ladles who will grace our city with their presence will be Mrs. W. Y. Atkinson, Mrs. John S. Candler, Mrs. Lolie M. Gordon, Miss Ella Powell and Miss Jennie English, who will be most delightfully entertained by the officers at Camp Northern. Gov. Atkinson to-day appointed Troup Whitehead as second lieutenant in Company C of Savannah, which office was made vacant by the resignation of Lieut. Leaken. Private Slater, of Capt. Davies’ company, has received promotion and is now drum major for the Third Regiment Band. Sergt. Vason of Company F has been temporarily detailed as commissary sergeant. Lieut. Hastings of Capt. Sanford’s company has been temporarily detailed regimental commissary, and Sergt. Napier of Capt. Sanders’ company is temporarily serving as sergeant major. It is said that the ordnance stores for the regiment have berm shipped and will be here in a few days when the regiment will be thoroughly equipped.

 

Savannah Morning News
August 23, 1898

THE THIRD TO BE RETAINED.
SECRETARY OF WAR GIVES HIS PROMISE TO LIVINGSTON.
Where the Regiment Will Go Is Not Known, But Col. Livingston Is Pulling for Their Assignment to Manila—Thought That Many More Troops Will Be Wanted There, and Plans Are Being Made Accordingly. First and Second Alabama to Be Mustered Out—Third Alabama to Be Retained.
Washington, Aug 22.—The Secretary of War has given his promise that the Third Georgia Regiment “shall not be among those first mustered out. He did that this morning in response to the request of Col. Livingston, who came on to Washington in the interest of the boys of the Third.
The congressman from the Fifth district went to the war department bright and early this morning and at once enlisted in his cause Assistant Secretary Meiklejohn, with whom he served several years in the House, and who is his personal friend.
The assistant secretary took the matter up at once. Col. Livingston told him of the excellent personnel of the regiment and of the great desire of officers and men for service. They were willing, he said, to go anywhere—their only desire being to see service. Col. Meiklejohn at once laid the matter before the secretary. The matter was discussed with Gen. Alger for a few minutes, and when he was in possession of all the facts, he told Col. Livingston that he might telegraph Col. Candler that his regiment would be retained in the service.
Where the regiment will go is not as yet known. Col. Livingston has put in a strong bid for the regiment to be assigned to Manila. The impression is strong that a good many more additional troops will have to be sent to Manila before peace and quiet is restored there. This is the impression both at the war and navy departments, and plans are being made accordingly. In view of this there may be a good chance for the Third going out there.
It was stated at the war department this morning that the First and Second Alabama regiments are to be mustered out.
The Third Alabama, a negro regiment, is to be retained.

 

Savannah Morning News
August 23, 1898

PRESENTED WITH COLORS.
Col. Candler Doesn’t Know What Will Be Done With His Men.
Griffin, Ga., Aug. 22.—During the greater part of to-day there were no sentinels on duty at Camp Northern. Only the prisoners were guarded by a small squad. This was the result of an order requiring the property of every man to be inspected and checked before going into the hands of the regimental quartermaster.
Lieut. T. F. Hastings will at once relieve Lieut. F. L. Palmer of the duties of acting regimental quartermaster, and Lieut. Palmer leaves in a few days for Atlanta, where he will finish his duties connected with the mobilization of the Third Georgia Regiment and thence return to his duties as first lieutenant Twenty-first Infantry, United States Army.
Some talk was heard regarding the moving of this regiment to Cuba at an early date. Col. Candler has reported to the adjutant general at Washington, but no orders have yet been received, and he does not know what will be done with his regiment. They are ready and willing to go anywhere in the world the authorities see fit to send them. This afternoon a committee of young ladies came down from Atlanta, and, in behalf of the Young Ladies’ Relief Association of that city, presented the regiment with a handsome flag. The young ladies were met at the depot by Col. Candler’s staff and escorted to the post, where all arrangements for the presentation had been made.
Every man in the regiment was at his post of duty, and a larger body of men was never seen on the grounds before.
Miss Jennie English, one of Atlanta’s fairest daughters, in a most graceful and becoming manner, presented the flag. At Col. Candler’s request, Maj. Spence, who had fought and bled for the colors, received them in a most appropriate way. His words of thanks showed his love for duty of his country. His tribute to the noble association presenting them with the handsome flag was a just one.
Sergt. Wooten, of Capt. Van Riper’s company, First Battalion, was /detailed as color sergeant, while Private Johnson of Capt. Davies’ company, Second Battalion, and Private Harp of Capt. Burr’s company, Third Battalion, were chosen guards to the colors.
Capt. Baker of the Second Battalion is color company of his regiment. Capt. Burr’s Company, Third Battalion, will act as escort to the colors.
The ladies of Atlanta are to present the regiment with another large and handsome flag in a few days.
Nine men were mustered in to-day, which were given to Capts. Sanders, Van Riper and Hodges, which fills their companies up to 106 men, the full quota.
Capt. Kolshorn of Savannah and Capt. Gilbert  of Albany have 101 men each, and say they could get fifty others before Saturday if needed.
Capt. Gilbert’s company is now the banner company in camp and its officers are working faithfully to keep it in the lead.

 

Americus Times-Tecorder
August 27, 1898

Georgia’s Military Muddle

An Atlanta special to the Savannah News discusses the status of the Georgia military and gives at length Gov. Atkinson’s views on the all important question. If the governor is quoted correctly the Times-Recorder applauds his bold, patriotic stand and hopes the war department will consider the feasible proposition of Georgia’s governor in the disposition of our military. The News’ correspondent says:
From all accounts there appears to be a pretty row on in the Third Georgia Regiment, now stationed at Camp Northen, over the reported desire of a large majority of the privates to be mustered out of the service at once, while the officers are trying to throttle this sentiment and keep the regiment that they may continue to wear shoulder straps and draw rations from the government crib.
Incidentally Gov. Atkinson, who has been appealed to by some of the men, is disgusted with the whole business and says that he wishes the whole volunteer army of this state would come up like men and, if it is their real desire, say in plain terms that they want to he mustered out.
The governor does not care to have much to say about the situation, and when questioned by the Morning News correspondent about it he was disposed to show impatience with the whole military establishment.
The Georgia boys enlisted to fight Spaniards, and he thinks that they did, and now want to go back to their business at home since there is nothing left to do but to perform police or garrison duty. The governor thinks they ought to say so without quibbling and thus settle the matter. It is said that the governor has suggested to the war department that all who desire to be mustered out in the three Georgia regiments be allowed to do so, and those who wish to serve be formed into a regiment. The idea is that if such course should be adopted enough men would be left who are willing and anxious to do garrison duty to form a complete regiment and thus all would be satisfied. Of course there would he a superfluity of officers, though it quite certain that some, at least of the officers, now in service with the governor’s regiments, including field officers, would prefer to quit rather than be sent off to some of our new possessions to do garrison duty.
While nothing positive is known as to their wishes it is said at the capital that neither Col. Lawton or Lieut Col. Garrard would care to continue in the service doing garrison duty.
Col. Oscar Brown is naturally anxious to continue, as war is his profession and the disbandment of his regiment of volunteers would mean that he resume his former rank as captain in the regular would service.
Col. John Candler of the Third Regiment also wants to serve his term, wherever his regiment may be sent, and from all accounts it seems that Lieut. Col. Berner is also stuck on his job and would be more than willing to go with the Third anywhere within the jurisdiction of the war department.  to make up one regiment of Georgians composed of those of the present three who want to continue in garrison duty in Cuba or other new possessions, the governor would probably designate the officers who would he retained.
Col. Candler wired from Griffin that he estimated that only about 10 percent of the men in his regiment were desirous of being mustered out. There are contradictory reports from Camp Northern, however, the other side claiming that but for the conduct of the officers in suppressing expression at least 75 per cent, of the men would openly declare their desire to be relieved of military duty, since they are not to have any chance to shoot Spaniards. If the war department should adopt the governor’s idea, that is to make up one regiment of Georgians composed of those of the present three who want to continue in garrison duty in Cuba or other new possessions, the governor would probably designate the officers who would be retained.

 

The Houston Home Journal.
September 01, 1898

Civil vs Military.

     There was a wordy conflict be tween civil and military authorities at Griffin last week, in which the military was victor.
     Several weeks ago a man giving his name as Ed Mallary hired a bicycle from a Fort Valley merchant to ride a few miles into the country, representing himself to be an officer going out to make an arrest.
Several days passed, and the bi cycle was not returned, then a warrant for larceny after trust was issued, Mallary was located, and when an effort to arrest him was made he escaped by running. The next heard from him was at Camp Northern, where he was a private in the Third Ga. Regiment.
     An effort to secure him by the Griffin Chief of police failed. Then Sheriff Cooper forwarded the warrant to the sheriff of Spalding county, writing that officer a letter explaining the circumstances upon which the warrant was based. Under the warrant Mallary was arrested, but an appeal to Col. Candler, in command of the regiment, resulted in his release and all expostulations to the contrary were futile.
To people under civil law this incident seems strange. It appears that military law is supreme when it affects Uncle Sam’s soldiers. If these soldiers are truly exempt from prosecution for violation of criminal law, then the fewer soldiers we have in these parts will be best for the country .—

 

The Macon telegraph

September 09, 1898

…Col. Candler has received orders, to move his regiment to Jacksonville, Fla., where they will report to Gen. Lee. This movement will probably be accomplished tomorrow, or just as soon as the cars necessary for transportation can be secured. Many of the soldiers are anxious to make the move, but others who have beard of the condition of camps at other places freely express a preference for remaining at Camp Northern Surgeon Major L. B. Grandy informed me that the health of the camp had been remarkably, good in spite of the wet weather. The greater portion of the men who were in the hospital were brought there by their imprudence in eating. No camp yet can show as clean a health record as Camp Northern.
The soldiers are deeply regretting the fact that the paymaster has not been in evidence and in speaking of the matter one of them said today: “It is embarrassing to many of us who are sadly in need of change. I know of many who have contracted small bills and enjoyed courtesies here that will leave feeling humiliated over the fact that they cannot discharge their obligations. Yet Uncle Sam, secure in the fact that he is good for his contracts, takes his own time and we are forced to acquiesce.”

 

Savannah Morning News
September 09, 1898

ORDERED TO REPORT TO LEE. THIRD REGIMENT TO MOVE AT ONCE TO JACKSONVILLE.

Col. Candler Receives His Orders Direct From Washington, and There Is No Possibility of a Fake — A General Howl Goes Up Among the Men and Two Commissioned Officers Send In Their Resignation. Thought That Other Officers Will Resign—A Hitch Likely to Occur Because of a Lack of Rations.

Griffin, Ga., Sept. B.—The Third Georgia Regiment, United States Volunteers, have been ordered to Jacksonville, Fla., and this time the order Is no fake, as it comes direct to Col. Candler from Washington.
About 7:30 o’clock last night Col. Candler received a telegram from Adjt. Gen. Corbin telling him to report to Gen. Lee at Jacksonville for duty and to be ready to depart in forty-eight hours.
As has been stated before, this order was preceded on Saturday inst, by a telephone message from Atlanta, stating they would be ordered away, but as no order came, many thought it was a fake, and men were rejoicing over the possibility of being mustered out In a short while. Many think It possible the regiment will break camps to-morrow and leave for their new encampment that night, but as the men will not be paid off until to-morrow morning, It is hardly probable they can complete arrangements and depart so soon. And again there is u hitch in the commissary department. The rations are running short and not enough is now on hand to furnish the men with a three-days’ or field ration. The new supply is billed to arrive Saturday. This may cause a delay of several days and it may be Monday before the regiment leaves. Col. Candler does not know himself when he will move. He will leave just as soon as possible.
When it was officially announced the regiment had been ordered away a general howl of complaint went up throughout the camp. Few of the men are desirous of doing garrison duty. They say they enlisted to fight Spain and not to guard property, as they have property of their own to look after.
As has been stated in the Morning News before, the commissioned officers were dissatisfied at the prospect of going to Jacksonville and threatened to resign their commissions should such be the case.
Two officers, Capt. Robert Hodges of Macon and Lieut. T. J. Ripley of DeKalb, sent in their resignations this afternoon and asked that the same take effect at once. It Is firmly believed at least a dozen other resignations will be handed in before the regiment departs. And yet some of these same officers think the men should remain In service for two years and do garrison duty.
Battery A will receive their pay and thirty days’ furlough to-morrow morning and leave at once for their homes.
Lieut. Brady [Bradley] and a squad of ten men will remain here to guard their property.
Camp Northern will again soon be deserted, unless the report now circulated that two Georgia regiments are soon to be brought here to be mustered out, is correct.

 

Savannah Morning News.
October 14, 1898, Page 2

DESERTER SHOT BY A SQUAD. H. H. DICKINSON MORTALLY WOUNDED NEAR LUELLA.
Corpl. Gossett Sent With a Detail to Take the Deserter Back to Northern and Dickinson and Two Others Resist—Appeared With Winchesters, and Private Marsh Fired on Dickinson in Order to Save the Corporal’s Life.
Griffin. Ga.. Oct. 13.—H. H. Dickinson [Henry H. Dickerson], a deserter from Company B, Third Georgia Regiment, was shot at an early hour this morning and will probably die from the effect of the wound. The shooting was done at Dickinson’s home, near Luella, while he was resisting arrest, by a squad sent to bring him back to Camp Northern The particulars of the affair were furnished by Corpl. R. W. Gossett, who was an eye-witness, and are as follows: At 1 o’clock yesterday morning a squad composed of Corpl. Gossett, Privates [Sam T. ] Jenkins, {William M.] March and LSim L.] Dallas, left this city for the purpose of arresting Dickinson, who was known to be at his father’s home near Luella.
It was 3 o’clock before the Dickinson place was reached and Corpl. Gossett placed his men around the house and awaited the coming of day when It was expected Dickinson would come out.
When the inmates of the house awoke they must have detected the presence of the determined guards surrounding the place for the door opened and Dickinson and two other deserters, Moore and Kitchen, stepped out heavily armed with Winchester rifles and pistols.
Corpl. Gossett recognized the men end called on them to surrender which command they disregarded. Some tried to make their escape, but Dickinson raised his Winchester to fire upon Gossett as soon as he could get a shot. A brother of Dickinson’s came out of the house and happened to get between Dickinson and Gossett and Gossett was unable to use his Springfield without shooting an innocent man.
Private Marsh saw the danger threatening his’officer and fired on Dickinson who fell mortally wounded. In the confusion that followed the other deserters fled to the woods and made their escape.
The corporal of the squad went to the fallen man and found him mortally wound ed. The bullet entered Dickinson’s neck just at the base of the skull and came out of his jaw, tearing one side of his face almost entirely away. At last accounts Dickinson was alive, but his chances for recovery are very slim.

The Dallas New Era
December 02, 1898

THIRD GA., IN SAVANNAH.
Co. C. 3rd Ga., Reg. U. S. V. Inft’y.
     We have taken one step toward what we have for over three long months been so anxiously waiting. The 3rd Ga., broke camps at Camp Northern Monday morning [November 21, 1898] and boarded the cars for Savannah at 3:15 p. m. Col. Rob’t Lee Berner wired Macon and Savannah ahead, and plenty of good sweetened coffee was ready at Macon for supper and Tuesday morning at  4 o’clock we arrived here, drank our coffee, ate our hardtack and quietly rested on the cars till reveille.
      At the first call at 5 o’clock the cars were unloaded at the  Georgia Car and Manufacturing Co.’s sheds, which were within a few hours converted into a splendid camp.
       Company “C,” who are noted for their quiet energy, were, as they always are, among the first to erect tents and get everything in perfect order. All the boys are very anxious to “take in” the city but a guard line was the first thing to be established, and only five at a time are allowed out.
Col. Berner took the wise precaution to remind the men by sections as they lined up on the parade grounds at Camp Northern to march to the cars, that he wanted his regiment to break the record of all former regiments, who have passed through the country, for good conduct,
      A sergeant was put in command of each car, and through the diligent execution of duty, and the high state of refinement of the privates, of which we boasted we secured compliments from the people in all the places we passed through, with cheers and good wishes which were highly creditable to the regiment.
     Nothing official has been heard as to when we will proceed to Cuba. It is reported that two transports, one of them the Chester, have sailed from New York and it is the belief that the Chester will carry Georgia boys to their new post.
     The 3rd Ga., is in a very fine state of health; a few cases of a very mild type of measles, and some pretty sore arms from vaccination are all the complaints heard.
     I am proud to say, to the credit of the Dallas and Paulding county boys, that they have, with one exception, a splendid company record, and have the highest praises by the commanding officer for their obedience to orders and strict adherence to duty. If the editor will kindly publish this I will promise through your column to keep my good friends and loved ones posted as to what we are doing. With best wishes for the kind editor success to the New Era and all Dallas and all Paulding county.
     I am your friend,
     Serg’t
Camp Northen continued to be the site of annual encampments of the Georgia National Guard until 1910. The camp was then turned over to the city of Griffin and became a park. This park is located in southwest Griffin, GA. A road in the north part of the park still bears the name “Camp Northen”.

Third Georgia Regiment U.S. Volunteers Camp at Savannah

In the Spanish-American War, nowhere was there greater fervor than in Georgia.  “When the United States became involved in war with Spain, Georgia furnished according to population more volunteers than any other State of the Union.”

Among Berrien County, GA men who volunteered for service in the Spanish American War were Walter A. Griner, Carl R. O’QuinnPythias D. Yapp,, Zachary T. Hester, W. Dutchman Stephens, Samuel Z. T. Lipham, James M. Bridges, Charles A. Courson, Love Culbreath, George C. Flowers, James L. Jordan and George A. Martin.  All enlisted in Company D, 3rd Georgia Regiment, U.S. Volunteers.

The Third Georgia Regiment, under the command of Colonel John S. Candler, completed its organization August 24, 1898 at Camp Northen, The regiment remained at Camp Northen until November 21, when it boarded the trains to Savannah, GA in preparation for embarkation to Cuba.

The Third Georgia Regiment arrived at Savannah in the early morning of November 22, 1898  on the Central Railroad, according to the Atlanta Constitution.

Atlanta Constitution
November 22, 1898

Third Georgia is in Savannah

      Savannah, Ga., November 21. -(Special.)- Colonel Curtis Guid, Jr., inspector general of the Seventh army corps, has been busy all day making arrangements for the camp site for the Third Georgia regiment, which was to have reached the city tonight shortly after 7 o’clock. The arrival of the regiment was reported at the DeSoto hotel at one time this evening, but it turned out that there had been a delay for some cause up the Central railroad, and the train dispatcher informed the corps officials that the first section of the regimental train would not reach the city until 2 o’clock in the morning. The second section will follow shortly afterwards, and the third will be in before 5 o’clock.
      Colonel George E. Pond, chief quartermaster of the corps, instructed the railroad authorities tonight to switch all the trains bringing the Third Georgia out to the works of the Georgia Car and Manufacturing Company, on the Ogeechee road, about three miles from the city. This is the spot where Colonel Sergeant’s regiment of immunes was camped and from which it had such a long and hot march to the Central railroad wharves. Arrangements had been made, however, to have the Third Georgia moved to the wharf on trains.         The regiment will not pitch all of its tents here…The officers’ tents will be pitched, but the men will be housed under the large shed belonging to the company, the use of which has been kindly permitted by President J.J. McDonough, one of Chatham’s legislators.

The men didn’t pitch their tents because the regiment expected an imminent departure. But the first available troop transport ships went to other regiments.   There was a cold snap and the men spent a chilly night under the open shed of the Georgia Car and Manufacturing, a mistake they wouldn’t make twice.

Atlanta Constitution
November 24, 1898
THIRD GEORGIA’S UNIQUE CAMP.

The Boys Pitch Tents on Flat Cars.
No Orders To March Set.
      Savannah, Ga., November 23. -(Special.)- The time of the departure of the Third Georgia regiment for Cuba is a matter of much doubt. The officers of the regiment supposed when they arrived here that they were to go on the transport Chester, which left New York yesterday and will be in Savannah tomorrow night, but today it developed that the Chester will carry the Fifteenth infantry to Neuvitas. The only other transports coming to Savannah now are the Manitoba, which will take to the same place six troops of the Eighth cavalry, and the Michigan, which will carry six more troops of cavalry to Porto Rico. The officers and men of the Third Georgia are a bit anxious about the matter, but it seems settled that the Fifteenth infantry will go first, as it has been ordered to leave Huntsville, Ala., for Savannah tomorrow. In this event the Third Georgia will hardly leave for Cuba until after the Chester has gone to Nuevitas and returned, which will require at least two weeks’ time, as vessels going to that port have to unload on lighters.
      The Third Georgia men put up their tents today, as they came pretty near freezing last night. Their tents are set up under a big shed and on top of a lot of flat cars at the Georgia Car and Manufacturing Company’s works and the camp is one of the most unique to be found in the country. The men are not complaining, but there is one thing certain, that there will be sickness among them if they have to remain long where they are. The country is low, and they cannot dig two feet without striking water. It is impossible, therefore, to secure sinks that will last for any length of time. Colonel Berner is somewhat anxious about the matter, but so far he has been unable to secure any definite information.

 

November 24, 1898 Savannah Morning News. The Savannah firm Lindsey & Morgan advertised portable heaters for soldiers' tents during the Spanish American War.

November 24, 1898 Savannah Morning News. The Savannah firm Lindsey & Morgan advertised portable oil heaters for soldiers’ tents during the Spanish American War. “You can take it with you to Cuba, if you go.

 

Other drawbacks to the site of Camp Carpenter were its remoteness from Savannah and the fact that the site provided no opportunity for drill or dress parade.  Despite some unfavorable conditions there were no reported complaints from the men and the discipline of the regiment was said to be in splendid shape.

State Legislators Visit Camp Carpenter

On November 26, the military committee of the state House of Representatives “arrived in the city…for the purpose of inspecting the Third Georgia regiment and looking in to the situation so far as the local state militia is concerned.” In the morning the committee was entertained by the city then were taken by carriages to tour the military facilities in the city, the army transport ships at the wharf,  and to the temporary camp of the Third Georgia regiment on the Ogeechee Road. The regiment named this site Camp Carpenter in honor of General Louis Henry Carpenter.

In the afternoon “the committee assembled in carriages at the park extension, being accompanied by General Fitzhugh Lee and officers of his staff, and there was a formal review of the Third Georgia led by Colonel R. L. Berner.

Fitzhugh Lee, nephew of Robert E. Lee. President Grover Cleveland appointed him consul general in Havana in 1896, a position he retained even after the election of President McKinley. At this time, Cuba was in chaos. Lee hoped for a U.S. intervention to help the rebels desiring independence, even though President McKinley wanted the Spanish government to come to a settlement without recourse to U.S. troops. A few hours after the President ordered the U.S.S. Maine to Havana Harbor, Lee telegraphed his advice not to send such a ship. Following the explosion on the Maine, Lee returned to Washington. On May 5, 1898 he was made a major general in the army and put in command of the Seventh Army Corps.

Fitzhugh Lee, nephew of Robert E. Lee. President Grover Cleveland appointed him consul general in Havana in 1896, a position he retained even after the election of President McKinley. At this time, Cuba was in chaos. Lee hoped for a U.S. intervention to help the rebels desiring independence, even though President McKinley wanted the Spanish government to come to a settlement without recourse to U.S. troops. A few hours after the President ordered the U.S.S. Maine to Havana Harbor, Lee telegraphed his advice not to send such a ship. Following the explosion on the Maine, Lee returned to Washington. On May 5, 1898 he was made a major general in the army and put in command of the Seventh Army Corps.

 Macon Telegraph
November 30, 1898   

       The committee, accompanied by Gen. Fitzhugh Lee and several of his staff officers, reviewed the Third Georgia  in the park extension. Though little was known of the fact that the regiment would be there, the people of Savannah gathered in large numbers, and the walks of the park and those around it were well filled when the review took place. The Third Georgia, in command of Col. Robert L. Berner, marched into the city, arriving about ten minutes before 3:30 o’clock, the time for the review. The regiment had an average of seventy-two men to the company, having left a large guard and kitchen detail at the camp, and made a splendid showing, upon which it was warmly complimented by Chairman Hardwick and all the members of the committee. After the review the committee was entertained at Thunderbolt by Messrs. LaRoche and McMillan.
      The object of the visit of the legislative committee was to gather an idea as to the advantages of the state militia, by making a study of the Third Georgia, In which are many of Georgia’s volunteer soldiers, and also of the situation here with the local military. The question of the state military appropriation for the year is at stake, and the matter Is a most important one, especially in view of the fact that retrenchment is now being made on all sides possible, except the matters of education and pensions.
      “I will say that the committee was well pleased with everything it has seen, ” Chairman Hardwick said. ”We were desirous of keeping up the appropriation if it were possible to do so, and if the need for it were made apparent. Since our investigation we are thoroughly satisfied of the advantages to be gained, and there is no question that the committee will recommend the full appropriation this year.”
      The committee was evidently well pleased with the treatment it received here, and was most favorably impressed from every standpoint. The usual military appropriation is 120,000, and the committee, as stated, will recommend the full amount this year.
      The committee returned to Atlanta last night, with the exception of Messrs. Hopkins, Hutchins and Erwin, who remained as guests of Mr. Jim Barrow, who came down with the committee.
     The following statement was drawn up by the committee just prior to Its departure last night, and its publication re quested :
     ”We desire to express our appreciation of the courteous treatment accorded the military committee of the House by your city officials, the Chatham delegation and the officers and men of the Third Georgia Regiment.
      “We tender our heartiest thanks to the Hon. I. W. Meldrim, Mayor of the city of Savannah, and to Dr. W. W. Owens, Mayor pro tem, for the hearty and cor dial welcome given by them to the committee, and for their many courtesies to us during our visit to their city.
      “We also desire to tender our thanks to Mr. John M. Egan for his courteous and considerate reception and entertainment of the committee. We are also grateful to the Hon. T. H. McMillan and Hon, W. P. LaRoche for their hospitable attentions and royal entertainment.
       We also highly appreciate the courteous attentions of Col. Berner and the officers and men of the Third Georgia Regiment for the splendid review given by the regiment, in honor of the committee’s visit. We feel very proud of the magnificent bearing and soldierly appearance of the regiment, and feel that no state has contributed a finer body of men to the service of the country. Our attention has been called by Gen. Lee to the fact that the Third Georgia is the only regiment he has seen which has not been provided’ with a handsome state flag, and we think the state of Georgia should remedy this over sight before the regiment leaves for Cuba by providing such a flag for the regiment at once.”
     The statement was signed by Hon. T. W. Hardwick, chairman committee on military affairs. House of Representatives, and J. M. Hopkins, secretary.

♦♦♦

Macon Telegraph
November 27,1898

The Third Georgia

May Be Some Time Before It Goes to Cuba.

       Many people will be interested to know that the Third Georgia may not go to Cuba for some time to come, and that it will be transferred to Gen. Lee’s headquarters. The story is told as follows by the Savannah Morning News:
        The Third Georgia regiment may be attached to the seventh army corps, in which event it will not go to Cuba for the present.
       Gen. Fitzhugh Lee, commanding the seventh army corps, received a telegram front the war department yesterday telling him that the Third Georgia regiment would be detained here for the present, asking him to provide a suitable camping ground for it, and stating that it might be attached to the seventh army corps. The statement on this line, while not positive indicated the probable intention of the war department to put the Third Georgia in Gen. Lee’s corps instead of leaving it in the second army corps, to which it is now attached.
     In the event this change is made as proposed, the Third Georgia will probably go to Havana instead of Nuevitas, as appears to have been intended. It is, of course, now definitely settled that the regiment will not go to Cuba on the transport Chester, which arrived here yesterday for the purpose of taking the Fifteenth Infantry, United States regulars, to Nuevitas, and if they are to be sent to that point shortly they will have to wait at least until the Chester returns.
      On account of the apparent change in the plans for the Third Georgia it has been found necessary to change their camping ground, and this will lie done at once. Gen. Lee has decided to put the regiment out on the Waters road something over half a mile beyond the junction of that road with Dale avenue. It will be located therefore considerable distance from the regiments composing the first division of the corps.
     The camp site having been decided upon, the work of extending water pipes to it from the mains put out in that part of the country by the city will be done today, and the Third Georgia will begin moving its camp from the works of the Georgia Car and Manufacturing company, on the Ogeechee road, today or tomorrow.
        The camp can be moved and set up within twelve or fourteen hours, with a sufficient supply of army wagons for the transportation, and from present appearances the movement will begin either Sunday or Monday.
     Should the Third Georgia regiment eventually be attached to the seventh army corps, the question is, where will it be placed? There are now two divisions of two brigades each in the corps. It would throw the corps somewhat out of proportion to have an odd regiment thrown in, but some provision will doubtless be made for it. Gen. Lee is of the opinion that other regiments will be sent here to be attached to the corps, in which event another brigade could be formed. The Second United States artillery, as is well known, is now on its way to Savannah, but Gen. Lee says the artillery regiment will not be brigaded with infantry, as it will have to be assigned to duty on the fortifications.
     The Third Georgia was, strange to say, the thirteenth regiment of Infantry to come to Savannah, the seventh army corps having brought twelve, and one of the officers remarked upon that fact the other day. He is not superstitious, but he has a curiosity to know just what is going to be done with the Georgians.
      Lieut. Orr of Newnan, quartermaster of the Third Georgia, has been in the city every day since the arrival of his regiment looking after its wants. Lieut. Orr says the regiment passed a most satisfactory Thanksgiving day, and the boys had all they wanted to eat. He says the men are very well situated in their camp at present, though there is some question as to whether it would be safe for them to remain there any length of time. He was of the opinion that a change would be made in the camp, and the chances are that the men will be notified to get ready to move at once.
     The Third Georgia boys are not complaining about their camp, but they all feel as if they would like to be within more convenient access to the city as long as they are stationed, here. Their camp on the Waters road will undoubtedly be a more satisfactory one, from every point of view.

♦♦♦

Savannah Morning News
November 29, 1898

MAY WAIT UNTIL TO-MORROW.
      Third Georgia Will Not Move Its Camp If the Weather Is Bad. It has not been definitely decided whether the Third Georgia Regiment will change its quarters to-day or not. If the weather is good the chances are that the work of moving may be begun; otherwise it will not. The new camping ground for the Third Georgia is now in good shape, the water supply having been put in and the company streets staked off. The regiment, however, is not suffering in its present quarters at the Georgia car works, and there is no necessity for moving in bad weather. The regiment in fact is quite comfortably quartered since its tents are set up under the sheds and no rain falls upon them. The wind, too, is shut off, and altogether the boys are getting on finely. It begins to look as if the Third Georgia will soon be attached to the Seventh Corps. No orders have been received with regard to it in some days. One of the staff officers when asked about it yesterday said: “The only definite thing with regard to the stay here of the Third Georgia is that it is indefinite.” 

♦♦♦

November 30, 1898

WILL MOVE THEIR CAMP TO-DAY.
Third Georgia Regiment to Change Its Quarters to Dale Avenue.

The camp of the Third Georgia Regiment will be moved to-day. The Georgians will come in from their quarters on the Ogeechee road and pitch their tents on the southern side of Dale avenue, a short distance to the west of the First Texas and Second Louisiana Regiments of the First Brigade, First Division. The work of moving camp will take about one day, and by to-night the new camp will be in good shape. A sufficient number of army wagons to carry the whole outfit will be sent out to the car works, and the Georgia boys will lose no time about moving. They have been very comfortably located where they are, but they want to get settled, and they are quite anxious to get near a car line as many of them like to come into the city occasionally. 

Col. Berner spoke proudly of the Third Georgia Regiment:

Robert Lee Berner

Robert Lee Berner

      “The Third Georgia is in splendid condition for the trip to Cuba. My men are in good health and spirits, and they are glad the day of departure has come. There was never a finer regiment of soldiers in the volunteer army, and I am proud of the men who will go to Cuba under my command. The boys are soldiers and gentle men, and you will hear of no outbreaks or disorder by them. They are well disciplined and are anxious to serve their country on Cuban soil. There are no brigands or outlaws among them, and they will not raid stores, stands or other people’s property, as has been done by some soldiers.
     “We do not expect to remain in Savannah but a few days. The regiment has been ordered to Neuvitas, Cuba, and as soon as the transports reach Savannah we will go on board and start for the Cuban port, which is to be our home for the next year or two, at least.
     “You may say to the people of Georgia that they need have no fear as to the conduct of the Third Georgia while in Cuba. My men will uphold the dignity of the state and the soldiery of Georgia, and good reports will be returned because there shall be no ground for bad ones.
     “We are deeply grateful for the many kind messages of good cheer sent its by friends throughout the state and they are appreciated sincerely.”
Lieut Col. Spence said:
      “The Third Georgia is a fine regiment and it will compare favorably with any of the service. I am glad to go to Cuba with the Georgia boys. The men are in good condition.”

Maj. John S. “Jack” Cohen said:
      “Our boys are happy that they are to go. To a man they want to see Cuba and they will board the transports cheerful and contented. Ours is the only regiment which is to see active service, and for that reason the men will make the very best record possible.”

The following week, it was ordered that all of the troops at Savannah would march in review for General Fitzhugh Lee,

Atlanta Constitution
December 4, 1898

Parade of Seventh Corps
General Lee Issues Order To All The Soldiers

Will be the Grandest Military Procession Seen in the South for Many Years.

      Savannah, Ga., December 3. -(Special.)- General Lee this afternoon issued an order for a grand parade and review of the entire Seventh army corps at 3 o’clock Tuesday afternoon at the park extension. This not only includes the Seventh army corps, but all the soldiers in and around Savannah, the Maine artillery, the signal corps, the Second regular regiment, light artillery and the batteries of the regulars just in from Porto Rico; the order also includes the Third Georgia regiment, which will be the first appearance of Colonel Bob Berner’s men. This will probably be the last appearance in Savannah of General Lee and his staff and of the Seventh army corps before their departure for Cuba. It will be the largest military parade held in the south since General Breckinridge reviewed the troops of Chickamauga from Snodgrass hill.
      It is doubtful now if General Fitzhugh Lee will be in Savannah when President McKinley visits the city, the middle of the month. Orders were issued today providing for the removal within a week of the First brigade, Second division, Seventh army corps to Havana, and the announcement is made that the transports Michigan, Mobile and Roumania will carry the brigade…

♦♦♦

Atlanta Constitution
December 7, 1898

FAREWELL REVIEW OF SEVENTH CORPS

General Fitzhugh Lee Reviews Sixteen Thousand Troops.

Third Georgia Was In Line

Confederate Veterans Formed General Lee’s Escort.

Savannah, Ga., December 6. – The farewell review of the Seventh army corps before its departure for Cuba took place in Forsyth park today. Sixteen thousand troops passed in review before General Lee. Besides the Seventh corps, the Third Georgia regiment, Second Unites States artillery and two light batteries from the Third, one from the Fourth and one from the Fifth and the First Maine artillery took part in the review.
Troop A of the First Georgia cavalry-the famous Jeff Davis legion of the civil war -formed General Lee’s escort and a dashing appearance on the reviewing field…

♦ ♦ ♦

Thirty thousand people witnessed the review, which was one of the most imposing ever seen in Savannah.Americus Times-Recorder, Dec 8, 1898

Seventh Army Corps passing in review, 1898

Seventh Army Corps passing in review, 1898

 

Related Posts:

Berrien Men Prepared for Spanish-American War at Camp Northen, GA

Spanish-American War Vet Rests at Ray City, GA

Remember the Maine, Aaron Cook and the Spanish American War

Roster of Company D, 3rd Regiment Georgia Infantry U.S. Volunteers

James & Ida Lou Patten and the Cruise to Cuba

 

Spanish-American War Vet Rests at Ray City, GA

Spanish American War

Does anyone remember the final resting place of Ben Howard?  When the young Spanish-American War veteran died at Ray’s Mill Pond in 1900, the citizens of Ray’s Mill, GA paid their respects.

Other Spanish-American War veterans of Berrien County, GA included Aaron Cook, Luther L. Hallman, William A. Knight, Samuel Z. T. Lipham, Walter A. Griner, Carl R. O’Quinn, Pythias D. Yapp, Henry C. McLendon, Charles A. Courson, George C. Flowers, Zachary T. Hester, Jr., W. Dutchman Stephens, and James L. Jordan.

Tifton Gazette
April 27, 1900

Found Dead Is His Boat.
The body of Ben Howard, a young white man, was found in a boat in the bottom of Ray’s mill pond last Saturday. The body had been there for two days or more, but the tragedy was kept a secret by the fact that the boat was a leaky vessel and had sunk to the bottom of the pond, carrying the body down with it. It is not known whether the young man was dead when the boat sunk or not, though it is thought that he had wounded himself by the accidental discharge of his gun while coming out of a tree, from which be had been shooting at fish in the water. The weapon was found at the foot of the tree and one barrel of it had been discharged. The boat was tied to the tree and the body either fell in it, or the wounded man managed to get to it.
Then the boat drifted out in the pond probably fifty yards and sunk to the bottom, the supposition being that Howard’s death was instantaneous, or else he was too badly wounded to manage the boat. A search for him lasted two days.
The burial services were conducted at Beaver Dam on Sunday and a large crowd attended them. Young Howard was a soldier in the war with Spain and did service in Cuba. —Valdosta Times.

 

Tifton Gazette, April 27, 1900 clipping of the death of Ben Howard at Ray's Mill Pond.

Tifton Gazette, April 27, 1900 clipping of the death of Ben Howard at Ray’s Mill Pond.

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Remember the Maine, Aaron Cook and the Spanish American War

Aaron Cook, of the Watson Grade community near Ray City, GA, was 30 years old when the  USS Maine sank in Havana harbor on February 15, 1898.

Grave of Aaron Cook, veteran of the Spanish-American War, Empire Church Cemetery, Lanier County, GA

Grave of Aaron Cook, veteran of the Spanish-American War, Empire Church Cemetery, near Ray City, GA.

Born June 23, 1867 in Berrien County, GA , Aaron A. Cook  was the youngest son of Lucretia Sirmans and John Jasper Cook. His parents’ farm was in the Watson Grade community just northeast of Rays Mill, GA.  His sister Charlotte married William Jackson Boyette, and sister Mary Ellen Cook (1876-1939) was the wife of Reverend Orville A. Knight.

Just weeks after his birth, local South Georgia papers observed that a rebellion was underway in Cuba, wryly noting that the U. S. government seemed to be more supportive of rebels in other countries.  The Cuban rebels founded the “Revolutionary Committee of Bayamo” in July 1867 and the period of Aaron Cook’s childhood and young adulthood coincided with Cuba’s long struggle for independence from Spain.   The people of Wiregrass Georgia were largely indifferent to the Cuban rebellion, although there was some U. S. desire for  the annexation of this “Queen of the Antilles” where American commercial interests were heavily invested.    In Cuba, the rebels quickly initiated an all-out military uprising against Spanish rule,  starting the  Ten Years’ War and unleashing contention with Spain which spanned a period of thirty years.

The smoldering Cuban insurrection re-erupted in the  Cuban War of Independence (1895–1898). In Wiregrass Georgia, the Cuban conflict was mostly marked by rising costs of coffee and sugar caused by the war, and a mild interest the Cuban rebels’ plans for emancipation of the slaves that worked the Cuban plantations.  A curious side note was circus promoter W. H. Harris’  offer of the man-killing elephant, Gypsy, to the Cuban insurgents.  In 1896, Gypsy had performed  before Wiregrass crowds in Thomasville, GA as a part of Harris’ Nickel Plate Show. Harris reckoned, “If Hannibal found elephants useful in battle, why should not [the Cubans] conquer with Gypsy.”  The elephant would be killed five years later after a murderous rampage in Valdosta, GA.

For the U. S., the war exploded with the sinking of USS Maine:

In January 1898, USS Maine, a second-class battleship built between 1888 and 1895, was sent to Havana  to protect American interests during the long-standing revolt of the Cubans against the Spanish government. In the evening of 15 February 1898, Maine sank when her forward gunpowder magazines exploded. Nearly three-quarters of the battleship’s crew died as a result of the explosion. While the cause of this great tragedy is still unsettled, contemporary American popular opinion blamed Spain, and war followed within a few months. http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/events/spanam/events/maineskg.htm

USS Maine as she entered Havana harbor, Cuba, on 25 January 1898. She was destroyed by explosion there some three weeks later, on 15 February. Image source: http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/events/spanam/events/maineskg.htm

USS Maine as she entered Havana harbor, Cuba, on 25 January 1898. She was destroyed by explosion there some three weeks later, on 15 February. Image source: http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/events/spanam/events/maineskg.htm

Following the sinking of the USS Maine in Havana harbor on February 15, 1898, the United States entered the conflict, allying with the rebels and declaring war on Spain on April 25, 1898.

No where was there greater war fervor than in Georgia.  “Georgia furnished according to population more volunteers than any other State of the Union,” and Wiregrass babies were  named in honor of the war’s heroes.

Aaron Cook was among some 3,000 Georgians  to serve in the Spanish-American War. He was enlisted on July 2, 1898, and mustered in at Macon, GA as a private in Company E, Third Regiment, U.S. Volunteer Infantry. Other Berrien countians serving in the Third Regiment were Luther Lawrence Hallman and William F. Patten, both in Company B.     Company E was mustered in with  63 enlisted men and 23 recruits under the command of Captain Yancey Cade Carter, 1st Lieutentant John A. Sibley,  of Tifton, GA, and 2nd Lieutenant Edward Stevens. Of the Georgia units activated for the Spanish American war, only the Third Volunteer Infantry would see overseas duty, serving as an occupation force in Cuba during the first three months of 1899.

Aaron Cook, Spanish-American War

Aaron Cook, Spanish-American War

The U.S. War Department was fully aware that Yellow Fever would pose a major threat to U.S. military operations in Cuba.

Yellow fever begins after an incubation period of three to six days. Most cases only cause a mild infection with fever, headache, chills, back pain, loss of appetite, nausea, and vomiting. In these cases the infection lasts only three to four days.

In fifteen percent of cases, however, sufferers enter a second, toxic phase of the disease with recurring fever, this time accompanied by jaundice due to liver damage, as well as abdominal pain. Bleeding in the mouth, the eyes, and the gastrointestinal tract will cause vomit containing blood, hence the Spanish name for yellow fever, vomito negro (“black vomit”). The toxic phase is fatal in approximately 20% of cases, making the overall fatality rate for the disease 3% (15% * 20%). In severe epidemics, the mortality may exceed 50%.

Surviving the infection provides lifelong immunity.

By the time the 3rd Georgia Regiment reached Cuba, an armistice  had been signed between the U.S. and Spain.  With the fighting ended, the Third Regiment assumed the role of occupation forces. After a few days at Santiago, the Regiment was transported by boat to Cameira de Cuba, then by train to Guantanamo, leaving garrison troops at each of these locations. Around August 22, the regiment arrived at Jamaica de Cuba, about 12 miles northwest of Guantanamo.

Aaron Cook’s unit, Company E, was assigned to maintain the garrison at Jamaica de Cuba and to man outposts at Los Canos, Santa Cecilla, San Carlos, Romila, and La Luisa.

 

The regiment served in Cuba until March 30, 1899 when it steamed for the U.S. The transport ship departed from Sagua de Tanamo and arrived at Fort Pulaski, Savannah, GA on April 2, 1899. The ship was sent to Sapelo Island for five days quarantine. Upon the return to Savannah, the troops were put aboard a train and sent to Macon, GA to be mustered out.

Aaron Cook received an honorable discharge on May 2, 1899.  Afterwards Aaron and his wife, Nancy Baldree Cook, spent the rest of their lives farming near Ray City, GA.

Aaron Cook died December 2, 1946 and was buried at Empire Church near Ray City, GA.  His widow applied for and received a headstone provided by the government to mark the graves of honorably discharged veterans. The upright marble headstone is inscribed in raised lettering inside a recessed shield.   The inscription encompasses the arched name and abbreviated military organization. No emblems of belief or additional inscriptions were inscribed.  While the dates of birth and death were allowed below the shield, these were not inscribed on Aaron Cook’s marker.

 

aaron-cook-headstone-app

 

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James & Ida Lou Patten and the Cruise to Cuba

James Marcus Patten (1869-1944) was a lifelong resident of the Ray’s Mill area (now Ray City). He was a son of Jehu John Patten and Mary Ellen Lancaster. He married Ida Lou Hall, of Newton, GA about 1902. They were both teachers and they taught in the common schools of the Ray City area for many years.

In  October of 1932 James and Ida Lou took a cruise to  Cuba.    Thirty-three years earlier, the U.S. had fought the Spanish-American War which had  liberated of Cuba from Spain, along with the Philippines, Guam, and Puerto Rico. U.S. efforts to normalize relations with Cuba had helped to make Cuba the most popular tourist destination in the Caribbean.

The Pattens traveled on the S.S. Cuba, sailing out Tampa, FL to Havana, Cuba, and returning by way of Key West, FL. Port of entry records at Key West, FL show they sailed from Havana on October 25, 1932  for the return voyage.

 

James Marcus Patten and Idalou Patten visit Havana, Cuba

James Marcus Patten and Idalou Patten, of Ray City, GA, visited Havana, Cuba in late October, 1932

 

SS Cuba at Morrow Castle (Castillo de los Tres Reyes Magos del Morro) entering Havana Harbor

SS Cuba at Morrow Castle (Castillo de los Tres Reyes Magos del Morro) entering Havana Harbor. Image courtesy of Björn Larsson http://www.timetableimages.com/maritime/index.htm

“Twice weekly the S. S. ‘Cuba’ of the Peninsular & Occidental Steam Ship Company, makes the trip from Port Tampa to Havana, via Key West and return.”

“S.S. Cuba – Twin screw, oil burner, length 342 feet, width 47 feet, speed 17 knots per hour, passenger capacity 512.  Especially designed for service in the tropics, having wide decks, all outside rooms and spacious saloons. One hundred and thirty-two first-cabin rooms with 16 parlor rooms containing double bed and sofa berth, private shower bath, toilet, running water, electric fans and every convenience for comfort.”

 

SS Cuba brochure,  P&O Steamship Company

SS Cuba brochure, P&O Steamship Company. Image courtesy of Björn Larsson http://www.timetableimages.com/maritime/index.htm

SS Cuba brochure, P&O Steamship Company

SS Cuba brochure, P&O Steamship Company. Image courtesy of Björn Larsson http://www.timetableimages.com/maritime/index.htm

Observation Deck, P&O Steamer

Observation Deck, P&O Steamer. Image courtesy of Björn Larsson http://www.timetableimages.com/maritime/index.htm

SS Cuba Promenade Deck

SS Cuba, Promenade Deck. Image courtesy of Björn Larsson http://www.timetableimages.com/maritime/index.htm

SS Cuba Promenade Deck, Aft

SS Cuba, Promenade Deck, Aft. Image courtesy of Björn Larsson http://www.timetableimages.com/maritime/index.htm

SS Cuba Main Lobby and Purser's Office

SS Cuba, Main Lobby and Purser’s Office. Image courtesy of Björn Larsson http://www.timetableimages.com/maritime/index.htm

SS Cuba, Veranda

SS Cuba, Veranda. Image courtesy of Björn Larsson http://www.timetableimages.com/maritime/index.htm

SS Cuba, Dining Room

SS Cuba, Dining Room. Image courtesy of Björn Larsson http://www.timetableimages.com/maritime/index.htm

SS Cuba, Writing Room

SS Cuba, Writing Room. Image courtesy of Björn Larsson http://www.timetableimages.com/maritime/index.htm

SS Cuba postcard

SS Cuba postcard

Havana excursion SS Cuba

Havana excursion SS Cuba

Just days after the Pattens left Cuba a hurricane struck the island, making landfall on November 9, 1932 at  Santa Cruz del Sur.  Thousands of lives were lost in the storm.