Georgia Normal College and Business Institute

The Ray City History Blog has previously noted the Ray City Alumni of Georgia Normal College and Business Institute at Abbeville, GA.

Georgia Normal College and Business Institute Abbeville GA

Georgia Normal College and Business Institute Abbeville GA

A number of the Clements family attended the Georgia Normal College and Business Institute including Lucius Jordan Clements, William Grover Clements, James Irwin Clements, Joe Clements, Chester Lee (son of Moses C. Lee and Amanda Clements),   Bessie Clements, and Hod P. Clements. D. C. Clements of Nashville, graduated from the business program in 1906.

Another alumnus from Ray City was Charlie Parham, who taught  in Ray City and Berrien County schools over a twenty year period, and served twelve years on the Berrien County School Board.

Samuel I. Watson attended the Institute in the year of its opening, and later served on the State Board of Education. When S. I. Watson arrived at Georgia Normal College and Business Institute in the winter of 1899 he wrote back to the Editor of the Tifton Gazette:

Samuel Irvin Watson attended the inaugural session of the Georgia Normal College and Business Institute in 1899.

Tifton Gazette
March 3, 1899

A Berrien Boy in Wilcox.

Abbeville, GA, Feb. 27. – As I have reached my destination, I take great pleasure in writing an article to your paper from this place, as I have found everything pleasant, both my traveling and place of stopping.
    While there is whiskey of almost every description sold here I have not seen an intoxicated person since I came to Wilcox county.
    I find the people of Abbeville and surrounding country to be intelligent, sober, whole-hearted, enthusiastic, sociable and enterprising, and who give a hearty welcome to those coming to their city.
   The enrollment of the Georgia Normal College and Business Institute is about 300, and it has been in session only about five months; the school ranks among the best in Georgia.  The principal is a plain, unassuming gentleman, whom we all, as students, love;  this however, applies to the entire faculty.
    There are students here from Georgia and Florida, and scarcely a vacant room for boarding students.  This town will surely have to make more arrangements for the accommodation of the latter, if they continue to increase as they have in the very short time the school has been in session.
    There is a great problem that should be carefully and accurately solved by each and every one of us that contemplates attending some high institution of learning.  A great meany of our boys and girls leave their state to obtain a higher education than can be accomplished in our common schools, but we ought to remember that it is an honor to us to recognize our own state, and that we have fully as good schools and colleges as any adjoining state.
    I hope to have some of my Berrien county friends come with me next time.

S. I. Watson.

P. S. Why not the teachers of Berrien have two days in the examination for license this year?

Students at Georgia Normal College and Business Institute. Albany, Georgia, 1911. Hod P. Clements (back row, 3rd from left) later became a banker in Ray City, GA. Image courtesy of Berrien County Historical Foundation http://www.berriencountyga.com/

Students at Georgia Normal College and Business Institute. Albany, Georgia, 1911. Hod P. Clements (back row, 3rd from left) later became a banker in Ray City, GA. Image courtesy of Berrien County Historical Foundation http://www.berriencountyga.com/

Here added is the 1902 commencement announcement:

The Atlanta Constitution
30 May 1902

Georgia Normal and Business School Ends Successful Year.

Abbeville, Ga., May 29. -(Special.)-The fourth annual commencement of the Georgia Normal College and Business institute closed here tonight. This was the most successful term in the history of the college and the number of graduates were greater than ever before.

The halls of the college were crowded to its utmost capacity at every exercise to hear the speeches of the graduates. Those graduating in the commercial class are Addie Laura Collins, Webster, Fla,; R. F. Dowdy, Vance, Ga; Florence E. Huss, Franklin, Ohio; D. F. Burnett, Jr., Madison, Fla.; Ashley C. Snow, Abbeville, Ga.; Gertrude Blow, Ashburn, Ga.; James C. Story, Abbeville, Ga; A. M. Sykes, Wright, Ga.; Elijah R. Simmons, T. J. Townsend, Lake Butler, Fla.; R. D. Howard, Patterson, Ga.; Lucius J. Clements, Millstown, Ga.; Alvin V. Sellers, Graham, Ga.; Ralph F. Collins, Bushnell, Fla.

Those graduating in the teachers’ class are Mollie Lee Dorminey, Dormineys Mill, Ga.; S.S. Knight, Lake Butler, Fla.; Eunice McCullough, Melrose, Fla.; E. A. Rice, Dupont, Ga.; Myrtle Baker, Abbeville, Ga.; Ida Irene Vause, Edgar, Fla.; W. O. Young, Leland, Fla.; Henry P. Smith, Simmons, Ga.; Lillie May Maynard, Abbeville, Ga.; J. A. J. Pinholster, Brooks, Fla.; Bessie Clements, Milltown, Ga.; R. S. Johns, New River, Fla.; Theola Ruff, Fort White, Fla.; Lola Smith, Abbeville, Ga.; Murrel Futch, High Springs, Fla.; C. L. Cowart, Collins, Ga.; Joseph Coffin, Lake Butler, Fla.; H. D. Warnock, Leland, Fla.

Those graduating in the scientific classes are Carlotta L. Townsend, Lake Butler, Fla.; Sampie Smith, Shepperd, Ga.; M. L. Purcell, Glenville, Ga.; Maude Avant, Patterson, Ga.; E. F. Fender, Griggs, Ga; H. J. Dame, Homerville, Ga.; I. S. Smith, Simmons, Ga.; Louis Smith, Simmons, Ga.; Mary Lizzie Paxson, Abbeville, Ga.; W. E. Carter, Louis, Ga.; N. M. Patten, Milltown, Ga.; W. B. Cornelius, Homerville, Ga.; Mark L. Morrill, Atlanta, Ga.

The commercial graduates are Elijah R. Simmons, Citra, Fla.; John D. Dorminey, Dormineys Mill, Ga.; Mark L. Morrill, Atlanta, Ga.; Helen S. Bomberg, Jasper, Fla.; S. F. Rogers, Abbeville, Ga.; L. M. Carter, Louis, Ga.; B. H. Dorminey, Dormineys Mill, Ga.; B. B. Maynard, Newton, Ga.; J. Louis McLeod, Abbeville, Ga.

When William Grover “Bill” Clements attended Georgia Normal College and Business Institute,

“He stayed at the dormitory which was run by the President of the Commerce Department. The charge for living at the school, including meals, was $9.80 a month which his parents paid for in syrup and bacon from the farm. It was a co-educational school.

Bill said, ‘The ladies lived downstairs and the gents up. I had a Yankee sweetheart. She was the sister of the Principal’s wife. There wasn’t much time for social activities then but I did play on the baseball team. I played first base and sometimes I was the catcher.’  He modestly didn’t want to admit it, but was one of the star hitters on the team.

  …the total enrollment was about 200 students at that time. Bill was graduated with honors, the leader of his class, and he was offered a job on the faculty. He turned it down though, preferring to go back to the farm and help his parents send the twins through school.” – Madison County Carrier, April 16, 1981 

Transcription courtesy of Ron Yates, http://www.yatesville.net/

The twins were Joe and Irwin Clements of Rays Mill, GA, students at the business institute in 1904:

A personal mention in the September 9, 1904 edition of the Tifton Gazette. Irwin and Joe Clements, and Chester L. Lee headed to college.

Commencement speaker Reverend John W. Domingos, of Tifton, reported this description after his visit to the college in 1905 :

I never had the pleasure of a visit to the delightful little town of Abbeville ’till last Saturday.  When I arrived on the grounds, and went into their school buildings, met the teachers, and examined a little into their fixtures and outfit, I was suprised to find a school of such proportions in the little city of Abbeville.
    There are on the grounds three spacious buildings, standing side by side all of them two-story buildings; two of these are built of wood, and the latest, a new building is of brick.  In the first of these, on the left as you approach them, phonograpy, or short hand, and type writing and telegraphy are taught on the first floor. On the second floor the intermediate classes are taught; and the museaum is also located on this floor.  In the middle and main building, on the first floor, are four class rooms; on the second floor are the auditorium, the music room and the laboratory. In the third, the new building, on the first floor, the work of the business department includes book keeping, banking, etc.  On the second floor is the principal’s recitation room.  This is a fine room, and can accommodate 100 pupils.  The library is also located on this floor.  It now contains between tow and three thousand volumes ans some of these are choice and costly works.  The books are very appropriately arranged, and are kept in splendid book cases.  There are twenty-two of these, four feet in length, with four shelves to the case.  In seventeen of these the books range in sections: Educational, fiction, literature, encyclopedias, language and mathematics, poetry, science, etc.  The other five are devoted to periodical literature, magazines, etc.
    Prof. W. A. Little is the principal of this school.  He is a man of rare gifts, push and energy, and is assisted by an able corps of teachers.  This is the listed course of study: Scientific course, teachers’ course, complete commercial course, accountants’ course, music course, shorthand, telegraphy, penmanship, post-graduate business course.
    They have had in the school this year, I was told, some 200 boarding pupils; but they have no dormitories; the pupils board in families in the town.  The principal told me that they have matriculated this year, in all, nearly 300 pupils…
    I give you these facts, Mr. Editor, for — people to think about a little.  The phenomenal success of this school is simply due to a few things.  First of all, of course, to the efficiency of the teachers, but very largely to two other things; first, they have good work-shops, or good buildings in which to do their work, and good material and implements with which to work; in the second place, they have the hearty co-operation of the people.  The school is the pride of the town.  Give a teacher or preacher your sympathy and co-operation and you can expect something of him;  withhold it, and you cannot get the best result.  Don’t put a man in an ice box, and then curse him for not sweating.
     We have a fine town; why may we not have one of the largest and best schools in all this country?

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Charles S. Parham ~ A “Sandlapper” Comes to Rays Mill

According to sciway.com, the term Sandlapper is a friendly nickname for South Carolinians. Charles S. “Charlie” Parham was a  transplant to Berrien County,  a “Sandlapper” originally hailing from South Carolina, and at other times living in Alabama , Florida, or Georgia.  He came to live  in Rays Mill, GA (nka Ray City) around 1898, when he was about  25 years old. Although he had just completed a program of study at the Georgia-Alabama Business College, he occupied himself in farming upon his arrival in Berrien county.  His brother,  Edwin P. Parham,  had previously settled in Berrien County and  was living at Rays Mill when enumerated in the census of 1900 and again in 1910.  Charlie Parham  farmed at Rays Mill for a couple of years and continued his studies.  He does not appear in Rays Mill in the Census of 1900, perhaps being away at school at the time the census was taken.  Around 1901 he spent a year in Abbeville, Ga attending Georgia Normal College and Business Institute. He taught many years in Berrien schools and served on the county school board.

By 1902 Charlie Parham was living in Nashville, Ga  and on February 8, 1903  he married Lola Lee Giddens of Rays Mill, GA.  She was a daughter of  Fannie Baskins and  William Knight Giddens.

Marriage Certificate of Charles S. Parham and Lola Lee Giddens,  February 8 1903, Berrien County, GA.

Marriage Certificate of Charles S. Parham and Lola Lee Giddens, February 8 1903, Berrien County, GA. Image Src: http://cdm.sos.state.ga.us/u?/countyfilm,187825

In Nashville, Charlie Parham found employment clerking in the local stores. He also found time for public office and taught in local schools.

1926 Poplar Springs Consolidated School opening. Inscription on building reads "Poplar Springs School District, Minerva Academy. Trustees: A. J. Guthrie, Chairman, J. L. Hughes, Secretary and Treasurer, N. L. Singletary; Originators of Consolidation, Moses G. Sirmons, S. M. Green, Dr. J. R. Lasseter; William G. Avera, Designer of Building, W. E. Register, Builder 1926." Teachers, Annie Lee Nix Maddox, Golie Spells, _____Sike, Charlie E. Parham, Alice Knight. (It is thought that many of the above-named persons are in this photo; Wm (Bill) G. Avera, School Superintendent, is the man with left hand against his chest, near middle of 2nd row.) Image courtesy of berriencountyga.com

1926 Poplar Springs Consolidated School opening. Inscription on building reads “Poplar Springs School District, Minerva Academy. Trustees: A. J. Guthrie, Chairman, J. L. Hughes, Secretary and Treasurer, N. L. Singletary; Originators of Consolidation, Moses G. Sirmons, S. M. Green, Dr. J. R. Lasseter; William G. Avera, Designer of Building, W. E. Register, Builder 1926.” Teachers, Annie Lee Nix Maddox, Golie Spells, _____Sike, Charlie E. Parham, Alice Knight. (It is thought that many of the above-named persons are in this photo; Wm (Bill) G. Avera, School Superintendent, is the man with left hand against his chest, near middle of 2nd row.) Image courtesy of berriencountyga.com

In the 1920s, C.S. Parham was situated with Miller Hardware & Furniture Company, his name appearing on the company letterhead.  At that time the firm had stores in Ray City, Nashville, and Milltown (Lakeland), GA.   

  
C.S. Parham appeared on the letterhead of Miller Hardware & Furniture Company in the 1920s.

C.S. Parham appeared on the letterhead of Miller Hardware & Furniture Company in the 1920s.

In 1937, the Nashville Herald ran a biographical sketch of Charles S. Parham that included additional details.

Nashville Herald
May 6, 1937
Flowers for the Living: CHARLES S. PARHAM

The subject this week is a South Carolina “Sandlaper” [sic] by birth, but a Georgian by preference.  Mr. C.S. Parham, known locally as Charlie, was born and reared in Malboro county, S.C. in 1873, making him 64 years old at this writing.  His father was the late C. J. Parham, who died in 1914 at 75 years of age, and his mother passed away in 1887 at 40 years of age.  Both were natives of South Carolina and lived all of their lives in that state.
       At the age of ten years Mr. Parham moved to Florida where he lived for the next ten years.  At twenty years of age he came to Georgia, enrolling at the Georgia-Alabama Business College in Macon.  The following year he was graduated.  It is strange to learn that prior to his business college education he had attended school only three weeks.  The education he had acquired was soaked up through his teens of his own accord.  He applied himself well for the chance he had.
In 1897 he left for Montgomery, Ala. where he worked for a year.  From there he came to Ray City, (old Rays Mill), his first time in Berrien county, where he farmed two years, and at the same time attending school at Lakeland (then Milltown). After that he took a teacher’s course at Abbeville for one year.  Since that course he taught school off and on for twenty years.
       He came to Nashville to live in 1902, and here he has resided ever since.  He first clerked for A. E. Bullard, General Merchandise, later taking a job in the store of S. T. Tygart, hardware dealer, which he held for over six years. During his time with Mr. Tygart he was elected Clerk of the Berrien Superior Court. This was in 1910.  He served two successful terms, four years, then offered and was elected county treasurer.  Before he could take over his duties, the office was abolished. This was his last time offering for public office.
       However, he has over the years served twelve years on the Nashville school board, and one term as city councilman. He is a member of the Nashville Baptist church and for years has been church clerk.
In 1903 he was married to Miss Lola Giddens, sister of Rev. A. H. Giddens of Nashville. There are two children, Mr. C. V. Parham of Atlanta, and Mrs. Charles Norwood of Nashville.  There is only one brother, Mr. E. P. Parham of Brooks county.
Mr. Parham is strictly a business man, and does not have much time for foolishness.  He does, however, like to go fishing when they bite, but does not care for hunting, explaining that there is always too much walking.  He likes to see a good basketball game.
      He is known to be one of the county’s most able business men, attending to his duties, which practice has brought him success and financial stability. He is honest, clear-cut in his views and frank to say what he thinks and believes.  No one can accuse Charlie Parham of being two-faced, the worst feature of so many.  He will certainly call his shots as he sees them. This is one of his most admirable traits. At present he operates a number of farms near Nashville, and   each year makes money.
      Mr. Parham is a good citizen, and Berrien county people are glad to know they have a “sandlaper” in their midst. He is highly regarded and for a very good reason.

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Miller Hardware started at Ray City

Miller Hardware was one of the historic businesses of Ray City, GA. The Ray City store was managed by  Arthur Harvel Miller, brother of Lint Miller. Leon Clyde Miller clerked in the store.  Charlie Parham  and M. C. Lee were among the investors.

According to the Annual Report of the Secretary of State, the Miller Hardware & Furniture store located at Milltown, GA was incorporated in 1913 with a capital of $25,000. The trade journal Southern Hardware, Volumes 79-80, June 1918, W.R.C. Smith Pub. Co., 1918 pg 66 announced the incorporation of  a Miller Hardware & Furniture Company store at Ray City.

Image Right:  W. L. Miller and Lena Lee circa 1908. The couple were married in 1913 (see larger images at Berrien County Historical Foundation).

Willis Linton “Lint” Miller was the President and General Manager of the company. Later he served as Chairman of the State Highway Department.  James Thomas Phillips was a salesman for the company. Leon Earl Thigpen was a clerk at the Milltown location.

By 1923, the company letterhead boasted the capital stock had grown to $35,000. The letter head pictured below was from a document included in the death papers of Francis Marion Shaw.