Memorial of Judge Hansell

Judge Augustin H. Hansell spent 50 years on the bench of the of Southern Circuit of Georgia during which he tried many, many cases in Berrien County (see The Misadventures of Mr. Stewart, The State vs Burrell Hamilton Bailey, and Trial and Incarceration of James Thomas Beagles.)  In 1855, The Southern Enterprise reported Augustin H. Hansell was on the state ticket of the American or Know-Nothing Party as candidate for State senator; in this election, the judge advocated for the Brunswick & Florida Railroad and resented the charge that he was a prohibitionist.  He was a representative of Thomas County, GA at the Georgia Secession Convention of 1861, and signed the Georgia Ordinance of Secession along with: John Carroll Lamb, of Berrien County, who would later serve as a captain of the Berrien Minute Men and a major of the 29th Georgia Regiment; and Colonel Carey W. Styles of Ware County, who commanded Captain Levi J. Knight’s company of Berrien Minutemen while they served with the 13th Georgia Regiment at Brunswick, GA.  He was a member of the Constitutional Convention of the of 1877, along with Ray’s Mill (now Ray City) resident Jonathan David Knight.

1907 Memorial to Judge Hansell

1907 Memorial to Judge Hansell

Tifton Gazette
Feb. 8, 1907

Memorial to Judge Hansell

Memorial services in honor of the late Judge Augustine H. Hansell were held at Thomasville Monday afternoon.  Judge Hansell presided over the Southern circuit for fifty years, and there was a large attendance of lawyers from all over the section.  The memorial committee appointed by Judge Robert G. Mitchell to have charge of the exercises consisted of W. M. Hammond, of Thomas, chairman; W. B. Bennett, of Brooks; O. M. Smith, of Lowndes; H. B. Peeples, of Berrien; John A. Wilkes, of Colquitt; J. R. Singletary, of Grady; C. W. Fulwood, of Tift, and R. G. Tison, of Echols.
    Captain Hammond, as chairman of the committee, delivered an eloquent eulogy – reciting the long public service of the honored judge.  A handsome portrait of Judge Hansell adons the court room, where the service was held.

Augustin H. Hansell

Augustin H. Hansell

The following sketch of the life of Judge Hansell is a composite of the memorial given in the Report of the Twenty-fourth Annual Session of the Georgia Bar Association, 1907  and biographical material contained in A History of Savannah and South Georgia, Volume 2, 1913.

JUDGE AUGUSTIN H. HANSELL.

Augustin H. Hansell was born in Milledgeville, Georgia,, on the 26th day of August, 1817. He died in Thomasville, Georgia, on Sunday morning, February 11, 1907. If he had lived until August 26, 1907, he would have reached the age of ninety years. While it is rarely the case that the allotted life of man is extended to the extreme age which Judge Hansell reached, it is still more rare, even to being remarkable, that one who lived for a period approaching a century should have spent nearly the entire time of so long a life in constant activity and service. Judge Hansell was practically “in harness” from his early manhood until the date of his death. From the time he was eighteen years of age until within a few years of his death he was actively and constantly engaged in service to his State and to his people.

******

The father of Augustine Harris Hansell was William Young Hansell, a native of the Greenville district of South Carolina. When William Young Hansell was a child he lost his father, and at the age of twelve came to Georgia to make his home with his uncle, William Young. Making the best of his opportunities he acquired a common school education and then studied law in Milledgeville, and after admission to the bar engaged in practice there. He was one of the eminent attorneys of his time, and his name appears in the Georgia supreme court reports. His active practice continued until 1860, and he then lived retired until his death in 1867. The maiden name of his wife was Susan Byne Harris, representing another prominent family of this state. She was born on a plantation about two miles from Milledgeville, and her father, Augustin Harris, a native of Burke county, was directly descended from one of four brothers who came to America during early colonial times and settled in Virginia. Augustin Harris was a Baldwin county planter, having numerous slaves and being one of the prosperous men of his section. Susan (Harris) Hansell survived her husband until 1874, and she reared two sons, Andrew J. and Augustin H., and five daughters.”

*****

Augustin Harris Hansell… being reared in one of the prosperous homes of Georgia, was given excellent advantages. Prof. Carlisle Beaman was one of his tutors in general subjects, and he studied law under R. K. Hines and Iverson L. Harris. After admission to the bar he began practice at Milledgeville, and for a time served as private secretary for Governor Gilmer.

*****

At the age of eighteen Judge Hansell served with distinction in the War of the Creek Indians of 1836. He was on the staff of General J. W. A. Sanford, of Baldwin county, and by reason of meritorious service was offered the promotion to a Major by General Sanford, but declined such appointment.

*****

Judge Hansell’s family relations were ideal. He was married to Miss Mary Anne Baillie Paine, of Milledgeville, on May 20, 1840. For sixty-six years they lived a perfectly happy married life.  Her father was Charles J . Paine, a native of Petersburg, Virginia, and a physician. As a young man he came to Georgia and was engaged in practice at Milledgeville until his death in 1857. Her mother was Ann Baillie Davies, the daughter of William Davies, a native of Savannah, and granddaughter of Edward Davies, a native of Wales, who was one of the early settlers of Georgia. William Davies also conferred honor upon the legal profession of Georgia, and served as judge of the superior court and was mayor of the city of Savannah during the War of 1812. William Davies married Mary Ann Baillie, the maiden name of whose mother was Ann McIntosh, a daughter of John Mohr McIntosh, the immigrant ancestor of the noted McIntosh family.

The  five children of Mary Anne Baillie Paine (1826-1906) and Augustin Harris Hansell (1917-1907) were as follows:

  1. Susan V. Hansell
  2. Charles Paine Hansell
  3. Mary H. Hansell
  4. Frances B. Hansell
  5. Sally H. Hansell

*****

Judge Hansell was elected to the Georgia Legislature in 1845 and represented the County of Pulaski.

*****

In 1847 he was elected Solicitor-General of the Southern Circuit and served for two years, at the end of which time he resigned to accept the position of Judge of the Superior Court of the Southern Circuit of Georgia, then embracing the greater part of south Georgia. Railroads had not yet penetrated to this region, and he journeyed from court to court in his private carriage.

For some years, until 1850, he was a resident of Hawkinsville, then in Scottsboro two years, and in November 1852 came to Thomasville, being one of the most prominent among the early settlers of this locality.

He resigned the position of Judge of the Southern Circuit in 1853, But went back on that bench in 1859.

*****

Judge Hansell was a member of the Georgia Secession Convention in 1861 and took a prominent part in that historic body. He did not enter the Confederate service in the War between the States on account of the fact that he was Judge of the Superior Court of the Southern Circuit during such war. He, however, gave to the Confederate cause his earnest sympathy and support and actively rendered efficient service and help as Chairman of the Relief Committee from Thomas County. During the siege of Atlanta he went to that city and aided in the relief of the sick and wounded. He was a tower of strength to his people during the stormy days of Reconstruction.

*****

He remained as Judge of this Circuit continuously until 1868, when he was removed from the bench by the Reconstruction Governor of Georgia, Rufus B. Bullock. He resumed private practice for four years, but in 1873 he was again elected Judge of the Southern Circuit and continued to serve in such capacity, being elected term after term without opposition, until January 1, 1903, a period of thirty continuous years in the service of his State.

*****

He was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1877 and did efficient work in that Convention in framing the State Constitution.

He took an active part in the various Conventions of Judges that compiled the rules of procedure and practice for the Superior Courts of the State. He was always present at these Conventions and was President of the last Convention held.

*****

At January 1, 1903 he voluntarily resigned from the bench and retired to the well-earned quiet and rest of his home. During his long career on the bench he made many important decisions and such implicit confidence did litigants repose in his learning and his integrity that appeals were very rarely taken from his decisions. An examination of the cases where appeals were taken, shows that a very small percentage were reversed by the higher Courts.

No better or more accurate statement can be given of his service as a lawyer and Judge than the following, which was written by one who knew him and loved him as a life-long friend:

“Judge Hansell was one of the ablest lawyers in the State, and stood easily among the foremost of Georgia’s great judicial lights. With an unfaltering and unerring hand he held the scales of justice evenly poised, meting out justice without fear or favor to all, to rich and poor alike. With a mind richly stored with legal lore, he made the law so plain that all grasped and comprehended it as it fell from his lips. He was an upright and a just Judge. No higher encomium could be pronounced. He wore the ermine for half a century and laid it aside without blur, blot, blemish or wrinkle. The bar and people of the Southern Circuit, over which he presided so long, venerated and loved him as but few men have been venerated and loved. The highest type of the old-time Southern gentleman, he impressed juries and litigants with the purity of his motives and the fairness of his rulings and charges. To the younger members of the bar he was ever ready to lend a helping hand, ever ready to advise and guide them.

To the officers of his Courts he was courteous and kind at all times.”

*****

During his life, Judge Hansell was chosen for office under every form of appointment and election that has existed in Georgia; gubernatorial, legislative and popular.

In the Report of the Twenty-sixth Annual Session of the Georgia Bar Association, 1909 , John D. Pope wrote, “I venture the assertion that any lawyer, who will undertake to look over the list of Judges appointed by Governors in time gone by, will agree with me that they were among the best that Georgia ever had, and these men were not changed on the Bench after their appointment except by their own will. Look at the lamented Judge A. H. Hansell on the Superior Court Bench for more than a half century! Where is the man in that circuit, or out of it, that knew him personally, or by reputation, who would have opposed him? Why? Because he was just and fearless, and every man knew, when he went before Judge Hansell he would get just what the law gave him, no more, no less: There was no politics there; it was a case of a great man administering the law!”

*****

At the time of his death Judge Hansell was the oldest Mason in the State of Georgia. He always took a marked and active interest in the work of this great order. He was made a Master Mason in the Milledgeville Lodge in 1838. A few years later he became a Royal Arch Mason and a Knight Templar at Macon, Ga. He served as Master of the Hawkinsville Lodge, was High Priest in the Thomasville Chapter and was an officer of the State Grand Chapter. Just a short while before his death he attended the Thomas County Convention of Masons and made a speech that greatly affected his Masonic brothers.

*****

The private life of Judge Hansell and that side of his character, which was known to his friends and his neighbors, is well expressed in the following tribute to his memory, written by the same friend referred to above:

“No citizen of Thomasville was ever held in higher regard or more universally esteemed. For half a century he lived here, going in and out among his neighbors, holding and retaining to the last hour of his earthly existence the respect, esteem and love of all, young and old. His kindness of heart, gentleness of spirit, and never-failing regard for others won for him, during his long and useful life, the sincere affection of all. His life was an inspiration to the young and his precepts and example all point to the loftiest type of good citizenship. He made the world better by having lived in it, and leaving it, left countless thousands to mourn his loss. Few men have left behind a more spotless record, or one more worthy of emulation. The golden rule was his guide through life. His memory will long be cherished by those who knew him, and cherished longest by those who knew him best. The good that he did will still live. It can not be entombed. The rising generation will be pointed to the life and character of this model citizen as an example to be followed, as an incentive for correct and upright living. Surely this is a rich legacy he has left behind him, a legacy far more valuable than sordid wealth.”

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Judge Hansell: Distinguished Man of Georgia

Augustin Harris Hansell, Judge on the Southern Circuit of Georgia from the 1850s to 1902, tried many cases in the Superior Court of Berrien County.

Augustin Harris Hansell, Judge on the Southern Circuit of Georgia from the 1850s to 1902, tried many cases in the Superior Court of Berrien County.

As a young attorney Augustin H. Hansell put up a sensational murder defense for Jim Hightower (aka James Stewart); as Solicitor General he won an equally sensational murder conviction against Jonathan Studstill, which was later pardoned by the state legislature. From 1858 to 1902, Judge Hansell sat on the bench for the Southern Circuit of the Superior Court.  He presided over the trials of  some of Ray City’s early settlers in the Superior Court of Berrien County.  One sensational case was the 1899 trial of James T. Biggles, who shot down Madison Pearson on the front porch Henry H. Knight’s mercantile store at Ray’s Mill, GA.  He was a representative of Thomas County, GA at the Georgia Secession Convention of 1861, and signed the Georgia Ordinance of Secession along with: John Carroll Lamb, of Berrien County, who would later serve as a captain of the Berrien Minute Men and a major of the 29th Georgia Regiment; and Colonel Carey W. Styles of Ware County, who commanded Captain Levi J. Knight’s company of Berrien Minutemen while they served with the 13th Georgia Regiment at Brunswick, GA.

 The Atlanta Constitution printed a short biography of Judge Hansell in 1896 :

 The Atlanta Constitution
March 2, 1896  Pg 8 JUDGE HANSELL.Sketch of One of Georgia’s Most Distinguished Men.

PUBLIC OFFICES HELD BY HIM

And Which He Has Filled to the Satisfaction of His People – Sketch of the Judge.

    The desire for information touching the personal history of those distinguished men who have become renowned in science, in arts, in letters, in statesmanship and in the attainments of those beneficial victories of peace no less renowned than those of war, has always been so general among our people that it may be said to be natural.
    We have such distinguished personages as these all over Georgia – men who have been in the public service for years with their harness still entwined tightly around them, dispensing justice or looking after the welfare of our beloved state. And one of these is Hon. Augustin H. Hansell, the patriarch judge of the southern circuit of Georgia.
    With only one year lacking, a half century has this good man occupied a seat in the judicial chair of his native state.  His is one of the grandest characters in all Georgia – grand in all the emolumental features that go to make up the man – grand in the mighty elements of characteristic truth, justice, and moderation; grand in the noble attributes of both public and private life, and grand in the pure, simple faith of Christian duty.
    With a mind loaded with the fruits of many years of arduous study and mental toil, and with a heart as tender as a woman’s and as big as Stone mountain, he wields the gavel of justice over the people like a loving father over a numerous household, as strict and stern to the deliberate transgressor as he is kind and lenient to the tear-eyed repentant.  What a strong argument his life would make in favor of electing judges for lifetime on good behavior.
    I was frequently thrown in contact with Judge Hansell during my stay in Thomasville this summer and obtaining from him a sketch of his life, which no doubt will be of interest to the people of Georgia and serve as a good moral lesson to the young generation now advancing.
    Augustin H. Hansell was born in Milledgeville, Ga., the 26th of August, 1817.
His father was William Y. Hansell, for a long time a prominent lawyer of that city and afterwards residing in Marietta. His mother was a daughter of Captain Augustin Harris and a sister of Judge Iverson L. Harris. of Milledgeville.  Judge Hansell was educated in the academies of that day.In 1836 he was one of the volunteer cavalry company from Baldwin county in the Creek war and while in the field was appointed military secretary by General J. W. S. Sanford, commanding the Georgia troops.  In 1838 he was appointed by Governor Gilmer as his military secretary under a special act of the legislature and at the expiration of that term he was appointed auditor of military claims against the state.  He afterwards studied to the bar at Macon under Judge S. M. D. King in May, 1839.  In  November of that year he located in Hawkinsville and devoted himself to his profession.   In May, 1840, he was married to Miss M. S. Paine, daughter of Dr. C. J. Paine, of Milledgeville, by Rev. John W. Baker, then pastor of the Presbyterian church there, but now residing in Marietta.  It was a veritable love match and as the years went by the bond of protection and loyalty, of care and fidelity, of mutual love and tenderness cemented these two hearts in a love that was unalterable.  Together they have lived for more than fifty-five years without a harsh or unkind word having passed between them and with a family of children who have been devoted to their parents and added greatly to the happiness of the peaceful, quiet old home.  Judge and Mrs. Hansell had a large reception of their friends at their golden wedding in 1890.
    In 1843 Judge Hansell was elected to and served one term as representative of Pulaski county in the legislature and in 1847 was elected solicitor general for the southern circuit, then extending from Laurens and Twiggs counties to the Florida line, covering an immense territory and commanding a travel by private conveyance of at least 2,000 miles every year to attend the various courts.
    Judge Hansell was a member of the Whig party, but devoted himself mainly to his profession and was never an offensive partisan, and in 1849, with a democratic majority in both branches of the legislature, he had so many warm personal friends of that party in the assembly that he was elected judge of the southern circuit by a handsome majority.  In the spring of 1850 he removed his family to Scottsboro, where they remained until November, 1852, when he resigned the judgeship and removed to Thomasville, his present home, and resumed the practice of law in partnership with  Hon. James L. Seward.
     In 1859 Judge Lane, who had succeeded him on the bench, was elected to congress and Judge Hansell was appointed to the bench by Governor Joseph E. Brown and elected by the people in January, 1860.  He continued on the bench and had been re-elected by the people in 1868, but on the reconstruction was voted off.  Soon afterwards he was nominated for congress by the democrats of the first district and accepted and made a short canvass of the district, but the election was postponed until the next year, and having fully resumed the practice of law, he declined being a candidate and continued to give his attention to the practice until the democrats gained control of the state government and in 1870 he was appointed judge by Governor James M. Smith and has been continued in office until this time and was re-elected by the last legislature for another term of four years and  is now under his eleventh commission as judge of the southern circuit.
    Judge Hansell was a member of the convention of 1861 when the state seceded, and was also a member of the constitutional convention of 1877.
    Judge Hansell, though always open and firm in his politics, has never been what is called an active politician, and as the greater part of his active life has been on the bench, he has been careful to avoid being offensive.  He has thus been fortunate in acquiring and retaining that confidence which is so important to a judge.  In all of his elections he has had no opposition since 1849, and has always been engaged holding his courts at such times without having to come to Atlanta to take part in the scrambles for office.
Judge and Mrs. Hansell were blessed with five  children, all of whom are now living.  Captain Charles P. Hansell, of Thomasville, well known in Georgia, is their only son, and their married daughters are Mrs. B. L. Baker, wife of the pastor of the Presbyterian church at Monticello, Fla.; Mrs. James S. Denham, wife of Hon. J. S. Denham, who has been mayor of that town for a good number of years, and a prominent merchant and business man, and Mrs. James Watt, wife of Mr. James Watt, a most successful hardware merchant of Thomasville, a native of Edinburgh, Scotland.  Only their youngest daughter, Miss Sallie, remains with “the old folks at home.”

     Judge Hansell’s manners are a singular union of artless simplicity, polished elegance and dignity; his conversation always breathes a pure and gentle spirit, while it is animated, judicious and instructive.  In his intercourse with the world he is never offensive, never sycophantic, equally opposed both to that confident self-esteem, which justly gives offense, and that cringing suppleness, which as justly loses respect.  He   has  a keen and intuitive perception of fact and character.  His principles of conduct are those of punctilious honor, refined and guarded by moral and religious sentiment.  He possesses strict and scrupulous integrity,  enthusiastic warmth and bravery of spirit, and that moral and civic courage which is most uncommon, most difficult of attainments, and most valuable and commanding of all the qualities which dignify and adorn the man and the citizen and without which the public official is a curse.
    His character, as exhibited in private life, is most attractive.  He is an attentive and affectionate father, husband and friend, indulgent to the faults of others, sincere, generous and affable.  He is a zealous and faithful Christian.  Religion is the child of his judgment, not the creation of his passion.  With the sublime system of revelation resting in his thoughts, the Christian law hangs like a tablet upon his breast, and duty ever points her finger to the scriptural commands graven there to serve him as a model for practice.
    He is now nearing the end of a long and useful career, being only a few  years of four score; and as he lives, so will he die, giving lessons and examples of good to his latest breath – the same composed, thoughtful, cheerful and peerless man when treading on the brink of time, as when careering  midway on his pilgrimage, elate with hope and scattering seeds of good along his pathway.
   May God bless him and preserve him for many more years of usefulness to his people.    – MILLARD GEORGE.

Biggles case was tried by Judge Hansell

The Biggles murder trial of 1899 concerned a family feud at Rays Mill, Georgia in which J.T. Biggles gunned down Madison Pearson on the porch of Henry Harrison Knight’s store. (See 1887 Family Feud at Ray’s Mill, More on the 1887 Family Feud at Rays Mill, GA, Beagles/Biggles/Beigles of Rays Mill, The Biggles Farm.) Judge Hansell, who for fifty years served on the Southern Circuit of the Superior Court, presided at the trial.

Judge Augustin H. Hansell, Southern Circuit, tried many cases in Berrien County, GA.

Judge Augustin H. Hansell, Southern Circuit, tried many cases in Berrien County, GA.

The Atlanta Constitution
October 16, 1899 Pg 3

FIFTY YEARS ON THE BENCH
Judge Hansell’s Remarks to the Grand Jury of Berrien County.
    Tifton, Ga., October 15. – (Special.) – Berrien superior court, after four days’ session, adjourned Thursday evening.  The entire session of the court was devoted to criminal business, no civil cases being called for trial.
  The most important case was that against Thomas J. Beagles, who killed his brother-in-law, Madison G. Pearson, at Ray’s Mill, this county [Berrien], November 4, 1887, or twelve years ago.
    Beagles had married Pearson’s sister and out of this a bitter enmity grew up between him and his brother-in-law.  Pearson had threatened Beagle’s life and a day or so previous to the shooting had gone to his house and cursed his wife and children.
    Beagles swore out a peace warrant for Pearson, and he was carried to justice court at Ray’s Mill for trial. On the court ground the difficulty arose again, and Pearson, the man under arrest challenged Beagles for a fight, and started out the door, pulling of his coat as he went.  Beagles was standing near the door and as Pearson came out unarmed, drew a pistol and shot him through the head.  The ball entered just in front of the right ear, and produced instant death.
    Beagles left the country and was gone three years, but came back and was arrested and placed under bond. Two months ago he was given up by his bondsmen and placed in jail.
The trial of the case consumed a day and a half.  The state was represented by Solicitor General Thomas and Colonel W. H. Griffin, of Valdosta,  and the defense by Colonels Joseph A. Alexander and W. M. Hammond.  Every inch of the ground was well fought and the arguments of Colonels Hammond and Griffin, covering six hours eloquent and masterly.  The jury remained out seven hours, returning a verdict of manslaughter with a recommendation to mercy.  Colonel Griffin made a touching and eloquent plea for a light sentence and Judge Hansel gave Beagles two years in the penitentiary.
Jim Oscar Sterns, colored, who killed another negro with a coupling pin in Tifton a few weeks ago, was sentenced to the penitentiary for life.
North Cochran, colored, who committed highway robbery, taking $41 from another negro, was given six years in the penitentiary.
Warren Moss, colored, who burglarized the store of C. G. Gray, at Lenox, was given five years.
John Davis, colored, who burglarized the store of J. L. Ford, in Tifton, was given five years.
There were a number of sentences to the chaingang for smaller offenses, all the parties being negroes.
The grand jury recommended the building of a new jail for the county.
In thanking the grand jury for an exceedingly complimentary reference to himself, Judge Hansell stated that next month would be the fiftieth anniversary of his donning the judicial ermine, and the fifty years had been spent on the bench in south Georgia.

Home of Judge Augustin H. Hansell circa 1884, Thomasville, GA. On porch, Mrs. Hansel and Judge Hansell; sitting on top step, Miss Sallie Hansell; on bottom step, Jim Jarrett; at foot of steps, Nannie Boles; standing in yard, left to right, Mrs. James Watt, William A Watt, Hansel Watt, Mr. James Watt.

Home of Judge Augustin H. Hansell circa 1884, Thomasville, GA. On porch, Mrs. Hansel and Judge Hansell; sitting on top step, Miss Sallie Hansell; on bottom step, Jim Jarrett; at foot of steps, Nannie Boles; standing in yard, left to right, Mrs. James Watt, William A Watt, Hansel Watt, Mr. James Watt.

In A HISTORY OF SAVANNAH AND SOUTH GEORGIA, (p. 872-874) author William Harden  wrote a brief sketch on the life of Judge Hansell:

Augustin Harris Hansell, father of Charles P., was born at Milledgeville, August 17, 1817, and being reared in one of the prosperous homes of Georgia, was given excellent advantages. Prof. Carlisle Beaman was one of his tutors in general subjects, and he studied law under R. K. Hines and Iverson L. Harris. After admission to the bar he began practice at Milledgeville, and for a time served as private secretary for Governor Gilmer. In 1847 he was elected solicitor general, and two years later judge of the southern circuit, then embracing the greater part of south Georgia. Railroads had not yet penetrated to this region, and he journeyed from court to court in his private carriage. He resigned as judge in 1853 but was again elected to the same office in 1859. For some years, until 1850, he was a resident of Hawkinsville, then in Scottsboro two years, and in 1852 came to Thomasville, being one of the most prominent among the early settlers of this locality. During the war he served on the relief committee, and in 1864 spent three months distributing supplies to the soldiers around Atlanta and Marietta. In 1868 he left the bench, resuming private practice for four years, but in 1872 was again appointed judge of the southern circuit and continued in this office until 1903. For more than forty years he honored the bench with his character and ability, and his is one of the foremost names in the Georgia judiciary during the last half of the nineteenth century. On retiring from the bench he lived retired until his death in 1907.

Judge Hansell married Miss Mary Ann Baillie Paine, who was born in Milledgeville. Her father was Charles J. Paine, a native of Petersburg, Virginia, and a physician. … Judge Hansell’s wife died in 1906, and her five children were as follows: Susan V., Charles Paine, Mary H., Frances B., and Sally H.

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