Obituary of Mason Clements

Mason Clements was a son of James Irwin Clements and Annie Mae Carter Clements,  and  graduated with the Ray City High School Class of 1943.

1950

1950

From Ray City, Georgia… Mason Clements was a three-year letterman for The Professors baseball team  at Georgia Teachers College in 1947, 1948 and 1949… Played major role in the rebirth of the baseball program after 12-year hiatus… Played for three coaches – R.I. DeWitt in ‘47, J.B. Scearce in ‘48 and J.I. Clements in ‘49… Helped Professors to three-year record of 41-21.

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Mr. Mason C. Clements entered in to rest at his residence on Wednesday April 19, 2006. He was the son of the late James Irwin Clements and Annie Mae Carter Clements. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, Fay Joyner Clements; two sons, Mason Carter Clements, Jr., and wife, Donna, of Atlanta, GA, James Bert Clements, and wife, Sondra, of Atlanta, GA; one daughter Beverly Fay Clements Dye, and husband, Nathaniel, of Evans; six grandchildren, Katherine Clements Epilito, Bonnie Leigh Clements Sapp, Ashley Lauren Clements, Mason Bert Clements, Michelle Weltch Dye, and Jennifer Carter Dye; one great grandchild, Gavin Keith Sapp; and one brother, William Keith Clements, and wife, Joanne of Arlington, TX Mr. Clements was born in Palmetto, FL, having made Augusta his home since 1952. He served with honor during World War II in the United States Marine Corps at the Battle of Iwo Jima. He further distinguished himself as a student athlete at Georgia Southern University where he graduated in 1950. There he was named to Who’s Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities and to the Athletic Hall of Fame. Almost fifty-five years after graduation, Georgia Southern honored him with the Mason Clements Wall of Fame at the newly renovated J.I. Clements Stadium which was named after his late brother. He has received recognition throughout his business and community life through his service as President of Ammons Grocery Company, the Georgia Wholesale Grocers Association, and the Exchange Club of Augusta. He was a past member of the Board of Governors of the Augusta Country Club, the Board of Directors of Wachovia Bank of Georgia, and the Athletic Association Board of Georgia Southern University. Mr. Clements was a life long Baptist and a member of the First Baptist Church of Augusta for 52 years where he served on the Board of Deacons. Internment will be at Westover Memorial Park on Friday, April 21, 2006 at 11:00 am with Dr. Timothy Owings and Dr. Rodger Murchison officiating. Pallbearers will be Mr. Daniel P. Matheny, Mr. A. Roy Krouse, Mr. William E. Blanchard, Mr. Patrick G. Smith, Dr. John J. Cudd, Mr. William P. Stevens, Mr. W.T. Bolick, Jr., and Mr. Royce Boone. Honorary pallbearers will be members of the Crusaders Sunday School Class and the Exchange Club of Augusta. In Lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorials be made to the First Baptist Church Chapel Fund, 3500 Walton Way, Augusta, GA, 30909, American Cancer Society, 2623 Washington Road, Augusta, GA 30904, American Heart Association, 1105-D Fury’s Lane, Martinez, GA, 30907. Platt’s Funeral Home, 721 Crawford Ave. Augusta, GA 30904 706-733-3636 – See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/augustachronicle/obituary.aspx?n=mason-c-clements&pid=17494951&fhid=6207#sthash.4XD8KVyD.dpuf

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Clements Brothers at Georgia Teachers College

J.I. Clements, Jr of Ray City ~ Georgia Southern Hall of Famer

J.I. Clements, Jr. Goes to College

Clements Lumber Company and the Company Town

November 6, 1923 ~ Big Fire Loss at the Ray City Sawmill

Keith Clements and the Beauty Queens

Keith Clements was born in Ray City, GA, a son of James I. Clements and Annie Mae Carter and brother of J.I. Clements, Jr. and Mason Clements. His parents owned a home on the southeast corner of Ward Street and Jones Street. The Clements were among the most prominent families of Ray City.  The Clements sawmill was the largest industry and largest employer in Ray City.  After the Clements sold the lumber business about 1923, Keith’s father went into the retail grocery business.

Keith Clements, 1950,  Georgia Teachers College

Keith Clements, 1950, Georgia Teachers College

Keith attended  Ray City High School and graduated with the class of 1942.  All three Clements brothers served in World War II.

After the war, the three brothers attended Georgia Teachers College, now Georgia Southern University, in Statesboro, GA. When a beauty review was organized  at the school to select a “Miss Teachers College,”  Keith Clements was always ready to step up as an escort for one of the young ladies in the competition.

Betty Fuller from McRae,

Betty Fuller from McRae, “Miss T. C. of 1949” with her escort Keith Clements.

1950-Keith-Clements-and-beauty-queen

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1950-beauty-review-georgia-teachers-college

1950 Reflector – Yearbook of Georgia Teachers College

4th Annual Beauty Review

Lonadine Morgan from Egypt, Georgia, was crowned “Miss T. C. of 1950” at the fourth annual Beauty Review held in and overflowing auditorium. Sponsored by East Hall and escorted by Keith Clements, Lonadine reached the finals with a natural beauty and winning smile, her poise that of a champion. 

Lonadine Morgan,

Lonadine Morgan, “Miss Teachers College” of 1950, Statesboro, GA. Her escort was classmate Keith Clements, of Ray City, GA.

Betty Fuller from McRae,

Betty Fuller from McRae, “Miss T. C. of 1949” with the four other finalists: second-place winner Joyce Bowen of Rhine, third place winner Mary Ida Carpenter of Guyton, fourth place winner Mary West of Greymont, and Fay Joyner of Augusta.

Related Posts:

Luckie Stop at Ray City

Luckie Lumber Company

In the early 1900s there were  at least 86 lumber mills situated on the line of the Georgia & Florida Railroad running from Augusta, GA to Madison, FL, some 250 odd miles.   A big sawmill was situated on the railroad just  above Ray City, at a stop known as Luckie.  First operated under the name Luckie Lumber Company, it was owned by William F. Luckie.  About 1911, W.F. Luckie sold out to Levi J. Clements and his sons.  It appears that the Clements may have continued to operate under the name Luckie Lumber Company for several years, for the business was still listed under this name in the March 15, 1915 edition of the Lumber Trade Journal.  (see also Clements Lumber Company and the Company Town;  November 6, 1923 ~ Big Fire Loss at the Ray City Sawmill)

William Floyd Luckie, 1858-1937, operated the Luckie Lumber Company at Ray City, GA

William Floyd Luckie, 1858-1937, operated the Luckie Lumber Company at Ray City, GA

William Floyd Luckie

William Floyd Luckie, Jr.  was born on October 15, 1858 in  Greene County, Georgia. He was a son of William F. Luckie and Delaney Sayers, but was orphaned at an early age.  His father was killed in 1859.

“In 1859, a runaway slave of William Luckey’s was captured. While attempting to punish him, the slave grabbed a knife and stabbed Luckey to death.”  http://www.inheritage.org/almanack/c_greene_03.html

In 1861, his mother followed in death.

Afterward, William Floyd Luckie and his sisters, Falby and Mary were raised by their grandfather, James Martin Sayers, on his farm near Penfield, GA.  William Floyd Luckie was enumerated there in 1870 as William Sayers. At the time, he was assisting his grandfather with farm labor.

On March 20, 1887 William Floyd Luckie married Anita Inez Parks in Dodge County, GA. She was born in 1863 in Georgia.

Anita Inez Parks, first wife of William Floyd Luckie.

Anita Inez Parks, first wife of William Floyd Luckie.

By the census of 1900 the couple had seven children and made their home in Hortense, GA  in Wayne County, GA (now Brantley Co.) William was working as a merchant. Hortense is situated on the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, which ran the fast mail train through the town, from New York to Jacksonville. But the town generated such little traffic that it wasn’t even a flag stop for the railroad.

Children of Anita “Nida” Inez Parks and William Floyd Luckie:

  1. Fulton Woodard Luckie (1880-)
  2. Annie Mae Luckie (1891-1971)
  3. Nebbie I or J Luckie (1892-1977)
  4. Willis Heard Luckie (1894- abt 1984)
  5. Fannie C Luckie (1895- )
  6. Rosa Kate Luckie (1897- )
  7. Candler C Luckie (1899)
  8. William M Luckie (1902-1931)
  9. John Parks Luckie (November 14, 1903 –  October 23, 1996)

It appears that the Luckies moved about 85 miles from Hortense to McRae, GA  sometime before 1903.  Anita Inez Parks died May 5, 1906 and was buried there at Oak Grove Cemetery. William was left a widower with eight minor children to raise.

About 1907 William F. Luckie married a second time.  In 1908 a son was born to this union, James Luckie (1908-1974). Elizabeth Susan and William Floyd Luckie were enumerated in McRae, GA with their children in 1910. William was working as a sawmill superintendent; Elizabeth was keeping house.  In McRae, the Luckies owned a home on Huckabee Street,  named in honor of William Allen Huckabee. Huckabee was first president of  South Georgia College, a  school which had been founded at McRae about 1885.

Shortly after the 1910 census William F. Luckie came to the newly incorporated town of Ray City, GA.  Mr. Luckie founded the Luckie Lumber Company, a business that within a decade would grow to be one of the largest employers in the area. The big sawmill was located on the tracks of the Georgia and Florida about a mile north of town.

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Luckie were among the first members of the Ray City Methodist Church, along with Will Terry, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Turner, Mrs. Julia Dudley, Annie Lee Dudley, and Marie Dudley. The Church was organized by brother F.D. Ratcliff on October 29, 1910. The Rev. W.E. Hightower of Remerton, Georgia served as the first pastor. Originally the services were held in a tent on the north side of town near the homestead of Mr. and Mrs. Will Clements.

The business and social activities of the newcomers were newsworthy. The Valdosta Times, Saturday, November 26, 1910,  noted:

Mrs. B.W. Boyd and Mrs. W.F. Luckie, of Ray’s Mill came down yesterday and spent the day in this city on a shopping trip.

and in  January 19, 1911 The Valdosta Times reported from Rays Mill:

Mr. W. F. Luckie made a business trip to McRae last Saturday returning Monday.

In time, the Luckie children were on the social scene in Berrien county.   The Atlanta Constitution noted Willis Heard Luckie among the Ray City young people at the Nashville, GA carnival in 1914.

Atlanta Constitution, Feb 8, 1914, pg 8 M

Nashville (news items)

Rays Mill was well represented at the carnival last week. Misses Annie Mae Carter, Margie Dasher, Pearl Hardie Knight, Mr. and Mrs. G. V. Harvie, W. H. Luckie, George Norton, J. J. and J. S. Clements and C.B . Shaw were among the visitors.

Some time between 1914 and 1920, William F. Luckie had moved his family to Spence, GA in Grady County where he was operating a sawmill at the time of the 1920 census. But by 1921, the Luckies moved to Cairo, GA.

By the time of the 1930 census, William and Elizabeth Luckie had returned to Ray City.  They lived in town in a rented house; William Luckie engaged in truck farming.

William Floyd Luckie died on 16 Aug 1937 in Quitman, Brooks, Georgia. He was buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Quitman, Georgia.

William Floid Luckie (1858-1937), Oak Hill Cemetery, Quitman, GA.

William Floid Luckie (1858-1937), Oak Hill Cemetery, Quitman, GA.

After his death,  Elizabeth S. Luckie went to live in the home of her daughter Nebbie and son-in-law William H. Terry, on South Broad Street in Quitman, GA. She died on May 1, 1953 and is buried at Oak Hill Cemetery, Quitman, GA.

Elizabeth Susan Luckie, (1876-1953), Oak Hill Cemetery, Quitman, GA.

Elizabeth Susan Luckie, (1876-1953), Oak Hill Cemetery, Quitman, GA.

-30-

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Putnal Family ~ Town and Country

Putnal Family of Ray City, GA

The  farm place of Wayne and Ellen Gaskins Putnal was located on the south side of Ray City, on Park Street.  Wayne Putnal worked the farm during the week and on Saturdays he could be found in town at Leon Bradford’s barbershop.  The barbershop was located on the south side of Main Street just opposite the Victory Soda Shop.  Mr. Putnal worked many years there, cutting hair and giving shaves. In his later years he had a noticeable tremble, but his customers could always be confident that he would apply scissors to locks or straight razor to whiskers with the steadiest hand.

There were seven children in the Putnal household, and they attended the Ray City School. They would walk up the dirt road that was Park Street to Johnson Street, then east to the school, joining the other farm children who lived along the way.

Children of Ellen Gaskins and Wayne Putnal:

  1. Leston L. Putnal
  2. Grace Marguerite Putnal
  3. Clifford Earl Putnal
  4. Cary W. Putnal
  5. Nelda E. Putnal
  6. Dorthy E Putnal
  7. Glen H Putnal

Leston Putnal married Louise Cooper after graduating from Ray City High School. During WWII, he joined the Air Force, and it became a 30 year career. While he was away during the war his wife and son rented an apartment in Effie Guthrie Knight ‘s house on Park Street. The large old house had once served as a hotel for tourists visiting the Mayhaw Lake Amusement Park. Later, Leston Putnal and his family lived in Adel, GA.

After high school, the sisters Grace and Nelda Putnal went to Jacksonville, Florida. Nelda  got a job as an operator for the Standard Oil Company and in 1947 she married Charles J. Vance.  Grace Putnal  found work as a bookkeeper.  She married Bobby Earnest  in Duval County, Fl in 1953.

Cary W. Putnal moved to Macon, GA.

Earl Putnal   was known to other Ray City students by the nickname, “Guinea.”  Like his older brother, Earl fought in WWII. He served in the Navy and was wounded in action.  After the war,  he returned to Ray City and married Helen Marie Lee. She was the daughter of   Letha Brantley and Loren Lafayette Lee.   Earl and Helen moved to Jacksonville,  where Earl took a job as a clerk with Spencer Electric company. Later, they moved to Galveston, TX where Helen’s parents had already relocated.

Dorothy Putnal married Payne Webb, a successful merchant of Ray City.  He owned a liquor store located on the south side of Main Street, opposite the present day location of the Dollar General store. The couple spent their honeymoon in Atlanta, and returned to Ray City to make their home. After marriage, Dorothy went on to attend Georgia State Womans College at Valdosta, GA (now Valdosta State University.)   After Payne died of cancer she relocated to Atlanta and remarried.

Glen Putnal became a dentist.

When Wayne and Ellen Putnal were ‘senior citizens,’ they moved from their home on Park Street to a place in town.  Annie Mae Clements sold the Putnals a lot on the west side of her house, the Clements house being located on the southwest corner of  Jones and Ward streets.  Using  the same building plans from which their farm home had been constructed, the Putnals had a house built on the town lot.  In their new home the Putnals were known as “nice people and good neighbors.”

The Putnal house on Park Street is long gone, but the town home still stands on Jones Street in Ray City, GA.

J.I. Clements, Jr. Goes to College

J.I. Clements, Jr. Class of 1948, Eastern Kentucky University.

J.I. Clements, Jr. Class of 1948, Eastern Kentucky University.

James Irwin Clements, Jr. was born November 26, 1920 in Ray City, Georgia, the son of James I. Clements and Annie May Carter.  His father and uncle Joe Clements ran the family business, the Clements Sawmill .

The Clements family was among the most prominent families in Ray City.  The Clements sawmill was the largest industry and largest employer in Ray City.  After the Clements sold the lumber business about 1923, J.I.’s father went into the retail grocery business.

In 1940, J.I. Clements Jr. attended Norman Junior College, at Norman Park, GA, where he was engaged in student government.

 

Atlanta Constitution
October 12, 1940

STUDENT OFFICER NAMED

NORMAN PARK, Ga., Oct 11. In a runover election yesterday, J.I. Clements Jr., of Ray City, was elected secretary-treasurer of the student body of Norman Junior College over Warren Horton of Lake Wales, Fla., runner-up, and Earl Swindel of Ray City.  Doyle Rentz, Norman Park, student president, and Brown Pinkston, Tifton, vice president, already have taken over their new posts.

Brand Hall at Norman College, Norman Park, GA

Brand Hall at Norman College, Norman Park, GA

On June, 8 1944 James I Clements Jr enlisted as a private in the U.S. Army.  At 23 years of age, he was married, five feet eight inches tall and weighed 190 pounds.  He had two years of college education and was employed in the category of “Athletes, sports instructors, and sports officials.” He enlisted at Fort McPherson, Atlanta, GA.

 After the war he returned to school, attending Eastern Kentucky University.  He played on the baseball team and was a member of Kappa Delta Pi Honor Society in Education. He received a Bachelor of Science in Physical Education in 1947, and his master’s degree in 1948.

Eastern Kentucky University Baseball Team, 1949. First Row: Left to Right--Capt. Pete Nonnemacher, Roger Parsons, Jimmy Cinnamon, Dick Scherrbaum, Mac McCarty. Second Row: Left to Right--Lonnie Nelson, Howard Bartlett, Charles combs, Luther Wren, J. I. Clements, Jim Thompson, Coach "Turkey" Hughes, Manager Charles Spicer. Third Row: Left to Right--Don Newsom, Ted Dunn, Ed Lewicki, Ray Giltner, Goebel Ritter, Carl Eagle, Jack Meeks.

Eastern Kentucky University Baseball Team, 1949.

First Row: Left to Right–Capt. Pete Nonnemacher, Roger Parsons, Jimmy Cinnamon, Dick Scherrbaum, Mac McCarty.
Second Row: Left to Right–Lonnie Nelson, Howard Bartlett, Charles combs, Luther Wren, J. I. Clements, Jim Thompson, Coach “Turkey” Hughes, Manager Charles Spicer.
Third Row: Left to Right–Don Newsom, Ted Dunn, Ed Lewicki, Ray Giltner, Goebel Ritter, Carl Eagle, Jack Meeks.

Addie Hodges Hardie of Ray City, GA

Addie B. Hodges was born March 15, 1889 in Lowndes County, GA.  When she was a young woman, she moved with her family  to Hahira, GA.   Her father, Irvin “Plimp” Hodges, was one of the merchants in town. In the mercantile business he probably had contact with salesmen in the drygoods line; salesmen like Gordon Hardie. At any rate, Addie and Gordon became aquainted and, by and by, they were married.

Marriage Certificate of Gordon Vancie Hardie and Addie B. Hodges

 Gordon Vancie Hardie and Addie B. Hodges were wed on November 25, 1912 in Lowndes County, GA. Perry T. Knight, Minister of God and native of Ray’s Mill, GA  (nka Ray City), performed the ceremony.

It seems that by the time they married, Gordon had already moved to Ray City, where he had gone into business for himself. 

 The Hardies where part of the social scene in Berrrien county. Although the press didn’t get their name right in the society item below, it was just one of many errors:

Atlanta  Constitution, Feb 8, 1914, pg 8 M
Nashville (news items)

Rays Mill was well represented at the carnival last week. Misses Annie Mae Carter, Margie Dasher, Pearl Hardie Knight, Mr. and Mrs. G. V. Harvie, W. H. LuckieGeorge Norton, J. J.  and J. S. Clements and C.B . Shaw were among the visitors.

 

The year 1919 was a difficult one for the Hardies. That summer, they lost an infant boy. The babe was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

 Sometime after 1924 the Hardies purchased a big white house with a high roof, on the north side of Jones Street on the block between Ward street and Samuel Street.  The house was originally built about 1917 for Rachel and Francis Marion Shaw (See Francis Marion Shaw Historical Site by Brian Shaw).   The Hardies occupied the house for many years. They kept a big garden on the lot west of the house, on the corner of Ward and Jones Street.

Ray City, GA home built circa 1917 for Francis Marion and Rachel Horne Shaw was later the residence of Gordon V. Hardie and wife, Addie Hodges Hardie. Image courtesy of http://berriencountyga.com/

Gordon Vancie Hardie died March 27, 1937 at just 46 years old. He was buried at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Gordon Vancie Hardie (1890-1937), Beaver Dam Cemeter, Ray City, GA

 In the 1950s, the widow Addie B. Hardie was a dear friend and neighbor to Lessie Guthrie Futch.  Lessie and Rossie Futch lived first in a small house next door to the Hardies on the east, then after 1951 directly across Jones Street, opposite the Hardie residence.  Addie Hardie was a frequent visitor to the Futch home.  Most afternoons, Mrs. Hardie would cross the street to visit with Lessie, and to have one of Lessie’s hot baked biscuits. When Lessie’s daughter happened to be visiting, she would do Mrs. Hardie’s hair.

Addie Hodges Hardie died October 9, 1972.  She was buried next to her husband at Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Addie Hodges Hardie (1889-1972), Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA

The Shaw/Hardie house on Jones Street was destroyed by fire in 1972, and the car shed seen in the background in the photo above was demolished in 2010. The lot where they stood is still vacant.  The Hardie’s big garden is now occupied by a modern brick house.

Related Posts:

William F. Luckie ~ Luckie Lumber Mill

A business which contributed much to the new town of Ray City, GA was the Luckie Lumber Company.  It was a huge operation run by William F. Luckie and located about 1 mile north of town on the Georgia & Florida rail line.

Luckie sold the sawmill operation to the Clements Brothers some time around 1911.

Mr. Luckie was on the social scene in Berrien county:

Atlanta  Constitution, Feb 8, 1914, pg 8 M

Nashville (news items)

Rays Mill was well represented at the carnival last week. Misses Annie Mae Carter, Margie Dasher, Pearl Hardie Knight, Mr. and Mrs. G. V. Harvie, W. H. Luckie,  George Norton, J. I.  and J. S. Clements and C.B . Shaw were among the visitors.

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