William J. Lamb ~ Confederate Veteran

A recently encountered photograph, taken January 1, 1908, depicts a gathering of Confederate veterans at Hahira, GA. Among them was William Joseph Lamb, who long resided in Georgia Militia District 1144, the Ray’s Mill (nka Ray City) District, Berrien County, GA.

Confederate Veterans, Hahira, Georgia, January 1, 1908  (1)  W. A. Ram, Dec 31, 1845 (2) J. W. Rouse, Aug 12, 1843  (3) H. C. Lang, July 13, 1839  (4) E. J. Williams, Oct 21, 1842  (5) J. A. Mobley, June 23, 1839  (6) M. M. Howard, Dec 19, 1848  (7) J. H. Tillman, 1842  (8)  Hardy Christian, Aug 31, 1838  (9) Jno L. Right, Dec 20, 1844  (10)  J. P. Powers, 1840  (11) M. C. Futch, Aug 20, 1836  (12)  C. H. Shaw, June 8, 1842  (13)  S. B. Dampier, Nov 18, 1835  (14)  T. A. Judge, Nov 22, 1843  (15)  J. W. Taylor, Oct 25, 1833  (16)  B. J. Sirmans, Feb 24, 1847  (17)  S. W. Register, Aug 5, 1839  (18)  A. Cowart, Dec 29, 1843  (19) J. T. Courson, Mar 22, 1848  (20)  J. M. Patterson, May 27, 1840 (21) Elbert Mathis, Oct 4, 1836  (22)   M. A. Tolar, Dec 8, 1832  (23)  J. H. King, Nov 3, 1839  (24)  G. W. Robinson, May 1, 1833  (25)  W. M. Watson, 1840  (26)  Jessie Moore, June 12, 1839   (27)  N. J. Money, Mar 28, 1845  (28)  A. Dixon, May 10, 1847  (29)  W. J. Lamb, Apr 20, 1837  (30)  Troy Thomas, Jan 13, 1833   (31)  W. W. Joyce, May 3, 1832   (32)  W. H. Green, Apr 13, 1834  (33)  W. H. Dent, Oct 12, 1844  (34)  Jas. W. Parish, Mar 2, 1847  (35) to get from photo owner  (36)  ditto (37)  ditto   (38)  Blu Sirmans, Nov 15, 1839   (39)  J. A. Lawson, July 10, 1836  (40)  J. J. Parrish, Sept 11, 1834  (41)  R. W. Roan, June 18, 1846  (42)  A. T. Tadlock, March 27, 1835  (43)  W. R. Starling, May 3, 1831  (44)  W. M. Lawson, Sept 7, 1834  (45)  W. E. Stephens, Dec 15, 1849  (46)  G. W. Powell, March 3, 1847  (47)  J. F. Barfield, July 7, 1833  (48)  W. W. Rutherford, Oct 18, 1825  (49)  J. J. Hutchinson, Oct 1, 1843  (50)  G. C. Hodges, Oct 13, 1846  (51) T. E. Swilley, Sept 22, 1843  (52)  J. I. Martin, Spt 21, 1844  (53)  E. J. Shanks, March 3, 1840  (54)  H. L. Smith, Dec 28, 1841  (55)  G. W. Stephens, Jan 8, 1833   (56)  T. A. Roberts, July 6, 1844  (57)  T. L. Wiseman, June 4, 1838  (58)  W. W. Wilkderson, June 10, 1830  (59)  H. B. Lawson, Aug 28, 1844  (60)

Confederate Veterans, Hahira, Georgia, January 1, 1908 (1) W. A. Ram, Dec 31, 1845 (2) J. W. Rouse, Aug 12, 1843 (3) H. C. Lang, July 13, 1839 (4) E. J. Williams, Oct 21, 1842 (5) J. A. Mobley, June 23, 1839 (6) M. M. Howard, Dec 19, 1848 (7) J. H. Tillman, 1842 (8) Hardy Christian, Aug 31, 1838 (9) Jno L. Right, Dec 20, 1844 (10) J. P. Powers, 1840 (11) M. C. Futch, Aug 20, 1836 (12) C. H. Shaw, June 8, 1842 (13) S. B. Dampier, Nov 18, 1835 (14) T. A. Judge, Nov 22, 1843 (15) J. W. Taylor, Oct 25, 1833 (16) B. J. Sirmans, Feb 24, 1847 (17) S. W. Register, Aug 5, 1839 (18) A. Cowart, Dec 29, 1843 (19) J. T. Courson, Mar 22, 1848 (20) J. M. Patterson, May 27, 1840 (21) Elbert Mathis, Oct 4, 1836 (22) M. A. Tolar, Dec 8, 1832 (23) J. H. King, Nov 3, 1839 (24) G. W. Robinson, May 1, 1833 (25) W. M. Watson, 1840 (26) Jessie Moore, June 12, 1839 (27) N. J. Money, Mar 28, 1845 (28) A. Dixon, May 10, 1847 (29) W. J. Lamb, Apr 20, 1837 (30) Troy Thomas, Jan 13, 1833 (31) W. W. Joyce, May 3, 1832 (32) W. H. Green, Apr 13, 1834 (33) W. H. Dent, Oct 12, 1844 (34) Jas. W. Parish, Mar 2, 1847 (35) to get from photo owner (36) ditto (37) ditto (38) Blu Sirmans, Nov 15, 1839 (39) J. A. Lawson, July 10, 1836 (40) J. J. Parrish, Sept 11, 1834 (41) R. W. Roan, June 18, 1846 (42) A. T. Tadlock, March 27, 1835 (43) W. R. Starling, May 3, 1831 (44) W. M. Lawson, Sept 7, 1834 (45) W. E. Stephens, Dec 15, 1849 (46) G. W. Powell, March 3, 1847 (47) J. F. Barfield, July 7, 1833 (48) W. W. Rutherford, Oct 18, 1825 (49) J. J. Hutchinson, Oct 1, 1843 (50) G. C. Hodges, Oct 13, 1846 (51) T. E. Swilley, Sept 22, 1843 (52) J. I. Martin, Spt 21, 1844 (53) E. J. Shanks, March 3, 1840 (54) H. L. Smith, Dec 28, 1841 (55) G. W. Stephens, Jan 8, 1833 (56) T. A. Roberts, July 6, 1844 (57) T. L. Wiseman, June 4, 1838 (58) W. W. Wilkderson, June 10, 1830 (59) H. B. Lawson, Aug 28, 1844 (60)

William J Lamb joined General Levi J. Knight’s Berrien County Minutemen,” Company C , Georgia 29th Infantry Regiment in Nashville, GA on August 1, 1861. On the 16th of May, 1862 he was appointed 3rd Sergeant of Company E, Georgia 54th Infantry Regiment. In September 1864 he was shot in the leg. He was sent to a hospital, then furloughed home. Later, Dr. H. M. Talley and Dr. M.Y. Allen, who examined William for his confederate veterans pension application, described the injury, “a gunshot wound just below the right knee, the leg was fractured and gangrene set in.” While William was recuperating at home the war ended.

1908 Photo Detail - William Joseph Lamb (1837-1908) ~ Confederate Veteran

1908 Photo Detail – William Joseph Lamb (1837-1908) ~ Confederate Veteran

Before the Civil War, William J. Lamb was one of the wealthiest men in Berrien County, with a total estate of $17,880 in the Census of 1860. In 2009 dollars that would have been about $58 million. But by 1870, the relative worth of his estate had declined by 97 percent.  By 1872, the Berrien County tax digest shows that William J. Lamb owned no land. He had $20 cash on hand and other personal property valued at $304 dollars. He employed one hand, a freedman named Morris Wilkins. By 1900, completely penniless and unable to support himself, William J. Lamb applied for and eventually received an Indigent Confederate Veteran’s Pension from the State of Georgia.

William J. Lamb passed away on June 13, 1908 just six months after the group photo above was taken. He was buried in Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, Berrien County, GA. (see Obituary of William J. Lamb ~ died June 13, 1908)

William Joseph Lamb (1837 – 1908). Beaver Dam Cemetery, Ray City, GA.

Related posts:

Samuel Guthrie and the Capitulation of Macon

Samuel Guthrie,  whose Ray City, GA family connections have been the discussion of earlier posts, was a Confederate veteran.  His  unit, Company E, 54th Georgia Volunteers, fought all over Georgia; at Dug Gap, Kennesaw Mountain, and Atlanta, and other battle locales.  Matthew Hodge Albritton, James Baskin, William Gaskins, George W. Knight, William Lamb, Jeremiah May, Rufus Ray, and Samuel Sanders among other Berrien countians also served in this Company.  On April 20-21, 1865, two weeks after Lee’s surrender at Appomattox the 54th Georgia Volunteers, under the command of General Howell Cobb, joined in the last, futile defense of Macon.

After the war, the Federal records reported the circumstances:

Macon, Ga.,
April 20, 1865.

2nd Cavalry Division, Military Division of Mississippi.

This affair was the last engagement of Wilson’s raid through Alabama and Georgia. When within 20 miles of Macon the advance division encountered a Confederate cavalry command of 400 men. By a series of brilliant charges by the 17th Ind. the enemy was driven from behind every barricade where he took refuge and was completely routed, throwing away arms and ammunition in the haste of his flight.

When nine miles out of the city a Confederate flag of truce was met announcing an armistice between Sherman and Johnston, but Col. Robt. H. G. Minty, commanding the advance, refused to honor it and gave it five minutes to get out of the way. The Federals then continued the charge and dashed over the works into the city, which was surrendered by Gen. Howell Cobb.

The results of the capture were 350 commissioned officers, 1,995 enlisted men, 60 pieces of artillery, a large amount of small arms, and all public works.

The casualties were not reported.

Source: The Union Army, Vol.,6 p.,580

In his memoirs, General James Harrison Wilson wrote

“It is a matter of history that Cobb was not only one of the largest slaveholders, but an original secessionist, whose proudest boast was that his state followed him, not he his state. Nor is there any doubt that from the first he threw his whole heart and fortune into the Confederate cause, but he was sagacious enough to know when Lee and Johnston surrendered and Davis became a fugitive that the end had come and from that moment he did all in his power to restore order and confidence and to help earnestly in the work which pressed upon me at Macon.”

Samuel Guthrie lived through the War  and mustered out on 10 May 1865 at Tallahassee, FL.  He returned to his home in Berrien County where he lived out the rest of his days.

Related Posts:

Death Papers of Martha Guthrie and the Death Date Discrepancy

Ray City History  

Martha Newbern Guthrie was the wife of Samuel F. Guthrie, and the daughter of Dred Newbern and Elizabeth “Betsy” Sirmans.  According to her grave marker, her birthdate was April 10, 1836.  The papers recording her date of death all show that she died on February 23, 1925.  

Martha Newbern Guthrie was a lifelong resident of Berrien County, Georgia and generations of her descendants have made their homes at Ray City, GA.  Her husband, Samuel F. Guthrie, fought in the Civil War in the 54th Georgia Volunteer Infantry.  After his death in 1910 she applied for and eventually received an annual Confederate Widow’s Pension. Her last application paperwork documents her death and burial arrangements.   

The death certificate of Martha Guthrie shows that her attending physician was Dr. J.V. Talley, of Nashville, GA, from Feb 21st to the 23rd. On the afternoon of February 23, she finally succumbed to “paralysis.”   

Death Certificate of Martha Newbern Guthrie

 

The doctor’s bill, the bill from W.H. Tygart for funeral arrangements, and the death certificate itself all confirm her death occurred on February 23, 1925.   

Why then does her grave marker at Guthrie Cemetery, Berrien County, Georgia give her date of death as January 25, 1925?   

Gravemarker of Martha Newbern Guthrie gives her death date as January 25, 1925.

 

For more history of the Guthrie family in Ray City, GA see http://raycity.pbworks.com

William Guthrie and the Bloody Battle of South Mountain

As a young man, William James Guthrie lived in the area of Lowndes county that would be cut into Berrien County in 1856, and later into Lanier County. Many of the Guthrie family connection still live in Ray City and Berrien County, Georgia.  By 1860 William Guthrie had moved his family to Clinch County, where in 1862 he joined the Clinch Volunteers, Company G, 50th Georgia Infantry Regiment.  His brother, Samuel Guthrie, joined the 54th Georgia Regiment.

In the fall of 1862, the 50th Georgia Regiment suffered horrific casualties in the Maryland Campaign.  William Guthrie was killed September 14, 1862 at South Mountain near Boonesboro, Maryland. That was the day on which the 50th Georgia Infantry Regiment, and the rest of Drayton’s Brigade, was slaughtered at Fox’s Gap in the Battle of South Mountain.  The 50th GA Regiment suffered a casualty rate of 86% that bloody day, with 194 killed or wounded out of an effective force of about 225 men.  In Company I, the Berrien Light Infantry,  Mathew Hendley and Elisha B. Herring were among those killed; Richard P. Connell was mortally wounded; William Hartley and James H. Tison were missing in action; Lewis Marshall and Lemuel Gaskins were wounded and captured;  Randall McMillan was wounded.

By 3:00PM  Drayton’s Brigade arrived on the field. Drayton had initially deployed his brigade in an inverted L-shaped formation at the gap. The 550 men in his two South Carolina units were in the Old Sharpsburg Road facing south and the 750 soldiers in the three Georgia units were posted facing east at a stone wall overlooking a deep ravine some 200 yards east of the Wood Road. At 4:00PM Col. Drayton ordered his three veteran regiments to attack the Federals to the south. His two new regiments, the 50th and 51st Georgia, moved into the sunken road, also facing south to offer support. What Drayton did not know was that Orlando Willcox’s 3,600 man IX Corps division had arrived on the field and was massed ready to launch an attack just beyond the forest to the left front. The Federals charged northwest into the woods and pushed the Phillips Legion out of the woods into Wise’s field. Willcox’s Federals quickly reached the edge of the woods facing the 50th Georgia in the Old Sharpsburg Road. The 30th Ohio of Cox’s division had also charged forward south of Wise’s field and, in conjunction with Willcox’s troops now at the eastern edge of Wise’s field, forced the 3rd SC Battalion to spin 90 degrees and drop into the “protection” of the Ridge Road. To the east the 800 man 17th Michigan regiment of Willcox’s division, which had been sent by Willcox to get behind the Confederate’s left (eastern) flank, had moved into the field behind the Georgians. Having gained the rear of the enemy, the 17th Michigan changed their front facing south and charged the Georgians, stopping about 20 yards from the road and began to fire into the Confederates in the road. Most of the 350 casualties suffered by the two Georgia regiments occurred in the road in front of you, in a span of time lasting less than five minutes. The Federals had now almost surrounded Drayton’s men. The 45th Pennsylvania and the 46th New York were pouring in volleys from the east side of Wise’s field. The 30th Ohio was firing from the south end of the field and other elements of Cox’s division were working through the woods to the west. Meanwhile the 17th Michigan had moved around behind the Confederate left (eastern) flank and was charging up the fields north of the Old Sharpsburg Road. By 5:00Pm the last of Drayton’s Brigade was driven from the field. The entire brigade suffered a staggering 51% loss. –http://friendsofsouthmountain.org/foxsgaptrail.html

Old Sharpsburg Road, South Mountain, Maryland, GA

Old Sharpsburg Road, South Mountain, Maryland, GA

As terrible as the Confederate losses were at South Mountain, they were just a “bloody prelude” to the battle fought three days later at Antietam, September 17, 1862.  The remnants of the 50th Georgia Regiment experienced that day from the vantage point of the Lower Bridge over Antietam Creek, afterwards known as “Burnside’s Bridge.”

Antietam bridge, looking across stream. Sept. 1862. Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882, photographer.

Antietam bridge, looking across stream. Sept. 1862. Afterwards known as Burnside’s Bridge. Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882, photographer.

On the morning of September 17, 1862, this bridge was defended by the 2nd and 20th Georgia of Toombs’ Brigade and the 50th Georgia of Drayton’s Brigade. The 20th Georgia was on the high wooded bluff immediately opposite this end of the bridge; and the 2nd and 50th Georgia in open order, supported by one Company of Jenkins’ S.C. Brigade, continued the line to Snavely’s Ford. One Company of the 20th Georgia was was on the narrow wooded strip north of this point between the creek and the Sharpsburg Road. Richardson’s Battery of the Washington Artillery was posted on the high ground about 500 yards northwest and Eubank’s (Va.) Battery on the bluff north of and overlooking the bridge. The Artillery on Cemetery Hill commanded the bridge and the road to Sharpsburg.

At 9 A.M. Crooks Brigade of the Ninth Corps, moving from the ridge northeast of the bridge, attempted to cross it but failed. Soon after, the 2nd Maryland and 6th New Hampshire, of Nagle’s Brigade, charging by the road from the south were repulsed. At 1 P.M. the bridge was carried by an assault of Ferrero’s Brigade and the defenders, after a vain effort to check Rodman’s Division, moving by Snavely’s Ford on their right flank, fell back to the Antietam Furnace Road and reformed on the outskirts of the town of Sharpsburg.

Antietam, Md. Confederate Dead by a Fence on the Hagerstown Road, Antietam, Maryland,
Alexander Gardner, photographer,
September 1862.

Antietam, Md. Confederate Dead by a Fence on the Hagerstown Road, Antietam, Maryland

According to the National Park Service, Antietam was the bloodiest one day battle in American history: 23,000 soldiers were killed, wounded or missing after twelve hours of savage combat on September 17, 1862. The Battle of Antietam ended the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia’s first invasion into the North and led to Abraham Lincoln’s issuance of the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. =http://www.nps.gov/ancm/index.htm

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