1898 Clippings from the 3rd Georgia Regiment, US Vols at Camp Northen

Camp Northen, Griffin County, GA was one of several camps where Georgia troops mobilized for the Spanish American War. Camp Northen was the site where the 3rd Georgia Regiment, U.S. Volunteers was organized and mustered in.

Several men of Berrien County, GA enlisted in Company D of the 3rd Georgia Regiment including Walter A. Griner, Carl R. O’Quinn, Pythias D. Yapp, Zachary T. Hester, W. Dutchman Stephens, Samuel Z.T. Lipham, James M. Bridges, Charles A. Courson, Love Culbreath, George C. Flowers, James L. Jordan and George A. Martin.

Spanish-American War enlistment record of Carl R. O'Quinn, Nashville, GA

Spanish-American War enlistment record of Carl R. O’Quinn, Nashville, GA

While the Third Regiment, U.S. Volunteers were training at Camp Northen numerous items were reported in state and local newspapers. A few clipping are presented below:

Atlanta Constitution
June 17, 1898

CALL ON THE WAY FROM WASHINGTON

Governor Notified That It Was Mailed to Him Yesterday

Five New Georgia Majors

Captain Willcoxon and Lieutenant Spence are Made Majors.

Griffin Soldiers Kick About Water

Soldiers Have to Boil It Before Using It for Drinking Purposes – Many Improvements

The call for Georgia’s third regiment of volunteers was issued and mailed from Washington yesterday and it will be received by Governor Atkinson today. The governor received telegraphic information that the adjutant general had given his assurance that the call would be mailed yesterday afternoon. The new regiment will consist of 1,336 men, rank and file…

Troops May not Go to Griffin
The Third Georgia Regiment may not be rendezvoused at Griffin. The water at Camp Northen is said to be impure and the soldiers, it is said, are complaining about it. Governor Atkinson is averse to sending the men to the camp unless better provision is made for their health and welfare, he says. The waterworks are at the bottom of a long slant, on which are situated the sinks for the various companies, and the officers say the water seeps through the refuse and gives the drinking water a bad taste. The governor stated yesterday that it is necessary to boil the water at Camp Northen before drinking it…

 

The Macon telegraph.
July 12, 1898

Quiet at Camp Northen
Recruits Are Coming in Slowly—News , From About Griffin.

Griffin, Go., July 11—Camp Northen is not presenting a very busy scene, although recruits have come in in squads daily. A number of them have stood the examination and the only waiting to be mustered in. The only incident of camp so far has been the reported loss of two watches, and steps have been taken to locate the offenders and secure the property if possible. The committee to secure an emergency fund for the boys in case of sickness was out today -under Mayor W. D. Davie, and met with good success in the short time they were canvassing. It is predicted that the fund will steadily grow. The recruits now in camp are a very quiet set and spend but little of their time in the city- Some few of them are beginning to feel a little home-sick on account of their inactivity.

 

Savannah morning news.
July 14, 1898

GEORGIA’S THIRD REGIMENT.
The Men at Camp Northen Gaining in Proficiency Daily.

Griffin, Ga., July 15.—A few moments spent at Camp Northen will readily convince one of the fact that Georgia will soon send another regiment of her sons to the front in the line of battle, or they will soon be ready for that duty. The men are now drilling from four to six hours each day, and when all are upon the parade ground in squads of twelve or twenty they show off to a decided advantage, and one can readily see front day to day the improvement. Camp has been established, and Col. Candler issues his orders for the day each morning to the adjutant. Of course the orders are not of the nature to command a regiment, but are strict and enforced. Guard mount is had each afternoon at 5:45 o’clock, when a detail from each company is accepted to serve guard during the night. Many of the men have never seen guard duty before, and interesting and laughable incidents are the result of their first lessons. A post office has been established upon the ground and those writing letters to the soldiers should direct them: “Third Regiment United States Infantry, Camp Northern” No complaint is heard from any source regarding the fare, and although the men have been on army rations for several days they knew before hand what they would have to eat, and are not kicking about it. New recruits are constantly arriving and it is hoped the regiment will soon be ready for mustering in. All the staff and the officers will soon be upon the ground, and then things will take a decided change for a more military appearance.

 

Thomasville Times
July 16, 1898

 Rev. D. H. Parker and family left last Tuesday, the former to assume his duties as chaplain of the 3rd Georgia Regiment of Volunteers (Immunes) and his family to reside in Thomasville during his absence in the army. Our city regretted to give up Dr. Parker and his family, and the best wishes of all go with them. – Bainbridge Search Light

 

Thomasville Times
July 16, 1898

The Duty of Georgians. Georgia has responded nobly and promptly, to the call for troops heretofore, and she will do now that another call is made. Southern Georgia, the Wiregrass region, has done her share, and it will continue to respond so long as there is a demand for troops. Lieutenant Pruett of the Third Georgia Regiment is recruiting in this section, and an opportunity is thus given all who are willing to enlist to do so. There may be plenty of fighting to do, or peace may soon be declared. In any event we hope this section will show up with its full quota. The third regiment, with Col. John Candler at the head, and a splendid line of officers, will make history for Georgia if called into action. There will be no better regiment in the army. We hope Lieut. Pruett will meet with the success he deserves in recruiting for the third regiment. He is engaged in a noble and patriotic work, and should be encouraged in every possible way.

 

Thomasville Times
July 16, 1898

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.

Santiago Survivors Pass Through Thomasville. Yesterday afternoon’s 2:25 train from Florida contained three survivors of the battle in front pf Santiago two weeks ago. They were Capt. Torrey and Lieut. Purdey, of the Sixth U. S. Infantry, and Lieut. Spence, of the Sixteenth U. S. Infantry. All were wounded in the terrible fight on San Juan heights. Capt. Torrey was shot through the leg, Lieut. Purdey through the thigh and Lieut. Spence had wounds in the leg and in the left hand. None of the wounds are serious and all of the officers were able to walk about.
Having been apprised of the coming of Capt. Torrey and Lieut. Purdey, a few of our patriotic citizens prepared a nice dinner for the gentlemen, added to which was some choice wines, fruits and flowers. Quite a number of people went to the depot to see the officers and as as the train stopped the Pullman in which they were riding was besieged by the crowd, all anxious to shake the hands of the gallant men who had made such a brave assault upon the Spanish stronghold. The officers, though surprised, were delighted at the attention bestowed upon them and were profuse in their expressions of gratitude. They were kept so busy shaking bauds that it was impossible to obtain an interview as to the situation around Santiago, but enough was gathered from their remarks to justify the statement that there is plenty of hard fighting to be done on the island yet, and many a brave American will yet be pierced with the deadly Spanish bullets.
Capt. Torrey and Lieut. Purdey, stated above, belong to the Sixth Infantry, from Fort Thomas, Ky., the first regiment that passed through Thomasville on the way to the front. It will be remembered that this regiment spent several hours in the city and that almost the whole town turned out to see them and the soldiers were fairly covered with flowers. On one of the cars was chalked the following sign: “The Fighting Sixth. We go to Avenge the  Murder of our Gallant Sailors.”
How well they have done this the story of the battle tells. The Sixth was in the thickest of the fight all the way through and lost more men probably than any other regiment. Capt. Torrey and Lieut. Purdey were on their way to Fort Thomas, where they will remain until they recover from their wounds, when they will rejoin their regiment.
The gentlemen who prepared the reception for Capt. Torrey and Lieut. Purdey regret very much that they were not apprised of the fact that Lieut. Spence was on the same train, so that they might have extended tho same courtesy to him.
Lieut. Spence is a South Georgia boy, a native of our sister county, Mitchell, and it is greatly regretted by the committee that they were in ignorance of his coming. It was not known by thorn that he was on board until after they had called upon the officers of the Sixth, by which time he had taken a carriage and gone up town. He remained here until the five o’clock freight left, on which he went to join his family in Camilla. During his stay here he was the center of attraction. Crowds followed him from place to place and if he answered one question be answered a thous and. He talked interestingly of the battle and the bravery of the American troops, but said he was glad to once more press American soil.
Lieut. Spence has recently been appointed a Major in the Third Georgia Regiment of Volunteers by Gov. Atkinson, and it is very likely that after he recovers he will remain here with his new command. He is a graduate of West Point and a fine officer.

 

Macon telegraph.
July 19, 1898

Recruits Come Into Camp Northern

Griffin, Ga., July 18.—The companies have all been mustered in at Camp Northen and the regiment is about half completed, with new recruits coming in each day.

 

Savannah morning news.
July 19, 1898,

COL. RAY’S IMMUNES.
Mustering in of Men Continues at Camp Northern
Griffin, Ga., July 18.—There is little of interest in Camp Northen now. The regular routine work Is accomplished each day with no difficulties. Mastering In recruits continues from day to day. There are about 100 men now in camp to be mustered in, but it will possibly lie some days before the necessary papers will be received. Most of these are minors, and Col. Candler will not consent to take any until full consent is given by their parents. Capt. Henry Kolshorn arrived this morning from Savannah, bringing several men with him. Capt. Kolshorn intends to have an ideal company, and there is no doubt of the fact that his intentions are sure to materialize, which will place his command at the top of the column. Capt. Gilbert of Albany has the largest company in camp, and is confident he will secure his full quota of men this week. He is a born gentleman, and a man of sterling integrity. His company is considered to be the best drilled one in camp, and strange to say, all except a very few were raw recruits who knew nothing of military life prior to their enlistment. The soldiers are being issued their uniforms as they are mustered in. They are not having the trouble in securing a good fit in clothing that the other regiments experienced.

 

Savannah Morning News. 
July 22, 1898

The case of Private Spence Hutchins of the Georgia Volunteer Artillery is not without a suggestion of humor. He was found guilty of the larceny of two lemons and a small quantity of sugar, probably taken in a moment of thoughtlessness and was sentenced to thirty days at hard labor. The sentence, however, was disapproved. The order is as follows: “Private Spence Hutchins, Light Battery A, Georgia Artillery, United States Volunteers, having boon tried by a general court martial convened at Camp Northern, Griffin, Ga., and found guilty of the larceny of two lemons and a quantity of sugar valued at 5 cents, in violation of the sixty-second article of war, was sentenced to hard labor for a term of thirty days. The sentence is disapproved. Private Hutchins will be returned to duty.”

 

Newnan Herald and Advertiser
July 22, 1898

Camp Northern

As Newman and Coweta county are quite liberally represented here, allow me a bit of space in your valuable sheet to give our friends at home an idea of how Uncle Sam’s pets, (the Third Georgia regiment, U. S. Vols are getting along. We have been in camp about two weeks, and the regiment now numbers something over 700 men. A few days ago the boys donned Uncle Sam’s war clothes, and a more ferocious set of Spaniard annihilators would be hard to find. The boys are becoming very anxious to get off to the war, but according to the best information obtainable it will be near the first of October before we leave Georgia. In the meantime we will undergo the seasoning process, which, according to military opinion, is so essential to the’making of a good, hardy soldier. It is surprising how the men are taking to military training. Most of our men, who knew nothing of the manual of arms when they came here, are now quite ‘proficient in the use of the gun. By the time the regiment fills up, (which will be pretty soon,) the men will be quite well drilled, and ready for the fray. We need about forty more men, and as Coweta and adjoining counties have furnished two-thirds of those we have, we confidently expect them to keep up the enlistment in the same proportion. We have many assurances from the farmer boys that they will join us as soon as they “lay-by” their crops. This, according to our judgment, is the proper thing to do, as they can make $18 per month, board and clothing included. With reference to board, clothing and bedding, they are good, and the boys enjoy them. According to newspaper reports we are not likely to see much campaign service, as they indicate an early ending of hostilities. In that event the probabilities are that our regiment will do garrison duty in one of the islands—Cuba, Porto Rico, or the Philippines. Our boys are fine specimens of prohibitionists. The “thirst parlors” here are conspicuous by their absence; and the “blind tiger” skulks in his lair since the advent of Col. Candler into these precincts. Col. Candler caught one of the brutes in flagrante delictu, and proceeded forthwith to put him through a course of sprouts.
Soldier Lad

Near Griffin, July 19th.

 

Americus Times-Recorder.
July 31, 1898

CANDLER OPPOSED TO PEACE.

Colonel of the Bloody Third is Anxious for Gore.
From indications at present there will be no need for the services of the regiment now organizing at Camp Northern, and the American soldier boys, as well as others there, may soon be ordered back to more peaceful pursuits if pending peace negotiations are pushed to a successful end. In the meantime, however, Colonel Candler, of the “Bloody Third” still sniffs Spanish gore from afar, and if correctly quoted is anxious that there shall be no end of the war until he can distinguish himself upon the field of death and carnage. The people of Georgia, however, will not coincide with Colonel Candler of the Bloody Third in his views. They are willing for him to achieve glory and fame, but not at the terrible cost of the lives of their sons who bravely responded to the call of arms to defend their country, now that there is no apparent need for such a sacrifice. Colonel Candler should curb his martial spirit, and if white-winged peace is to hover again over the land, resume the seat upon the bench which he failed to resign, and win additional laurels there instead of amid the blood and carnage of battle.

 

The Macon telegraph.
August 02, 1898

SOLDIERS TEAR DOWN FENCES.
Much Complaint Around Camp Northen—News Notes From Griffin.
Griffin, Ga., Aug. 1 —There Is considerable complaint by the citizens over what is claimed to be depredations by soldiers now stationed at Camp Northern. At first these were only such slight offenses as taking a few vegetables or fruit from where there was plenty. On good authority it is stated that panels of fence have been pulled down, and where this sort of vandalism could not be successfully accomplished, palings by the dozen were ripped off. It is impossible to locate just who the offenders are.

 

Savannah Morning News.
August 2, 1898

CANDLER’S RECRUITS.
Colonel Expects Regiment to Have Its Full Quota This Week.
Griffin, Gay, Aug. 1 —The heavy rains of the last few days have greatly interfered with the afternoon drills and dress parade at Camp Northern Sunday afternoon, as the troops were forming on the parade grounds, a heavy rain and thunder storm was an unwelcomed guest, and before the troops could be formed in line and dismissed by Col. Candler every man was wet through and through. But little complaint is heard about the rains, for they cool off the atmosphere and make things more comfortable. Many of the companies are filling up rapidly, and it is believed that all, except possibly one or two companies, will be full by Saturday. Capt. W. W. Davis’ will be the first company to muster in its full quota of men. He had ninety-seven men to-day, and more than twenty more arrived in the afternoon, who will be mustered In tomorrow. The band now has eighteen well-selected men. Col. Candler says the other six will be in camp before Sunday. Mr. Pollard, the band leader, is instructing the men under him, and is greatly encouraged at their aptness. Col. Candler has about completed arrangements to secure a set of fine band Instruments from the City Council of Americus, and expects them Wednesday. Several days ago nine men dropped out when they went to take the oath, and returned to their homes. This morning Col. Candler received a telegram from two of them asking to be taken back, stating they were under the influence of liquor before and now regretted their rash act. The officers won new laurels to-day at an elegant dinner. It was a most elegant affair and greatly enjoyed by a number of ladies. Capt. Kolshorn came up from Savannah Sunday morning, bringing several recruits with him. He returned home this morning, greatly encouraged with the progress being made by his men. Spalding county Superior Court was called to order at its regular session this morning by Judge M. W. Reck. Judge Beck has been fulfilling his duties in camp for several days, but is now holding court, which will probably not last longer than one week.

 

The Houston home journal.

August 04, 1898, Image 3

Lieut C. E. Gilbert spent last Sunday with the Third Georgia Regiment volunteers at Camp Northern, Griffin. The regiment lacks about 200 of being full, and Lieut Gilbert is still seeking volunteers, with headquarters at Fort Valley. The work of recruiting progresses slowly, and many of the volunteers have failed to pass the physical examination, ” which is very rigid. 

 

Savannah Morning News
August 09, 1898

LIEUT. SPENCE AT GRIFFIN.
Gallant Georgian Takes Up His Duties at the Camp.
Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 13.—R. H. L. Spence, the gallant Georgian who was wounded in the battle of Santiago, and who has been appointed major by Gov. Atkinson, entered upon his new duties to-day when the fourth company of the Third Georgia Regiment was mustered in at Camp Northern. Mr. Spence is a native of Georgia and married a Georgia lady, Miss Underwood of Camilla. He is a kinsman of Judge W. N. Spence of the Albany circuit. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1892, and his promotion from second lieutenant to major follows closely his first experience in battle. The Third Georgia is the only regiment in this state which has an officer who bears the scars of the present war. The acting adjutant general, Col. W. G. O’Bear, states that at the last reports there were 932 men in camp at Griffin. He thinks there are more than that number there to-day. The four companies which have been mustered into service are those of Capt. W. W. Davies, Capt. A. J. Burr, Jr., Capt. J. S. Powell and Capt. H. J. Stewart.

 

Savannah Morning News
August 9, 1898

GOOD WORK AT CAMP NORTHERN
Companies Making Good Progress in Their Military Duties.
Griffin, Ga„ Aug. 8  — Camp Northern is daily showing an improvement in its military discipline. The companies are fast filling up and being mustered in. Maj. Marcus W. Beck was to-day mustered in and took charge of his battalion. The Third Regiment band is fast filling up, now having 18 musicians enrolled. Prof. C. O. Pollard, chief musician, is busy instructing the men who are making a fine showing for the time they have been on duty. Edward Griggs of Dawson, has been appointed second principal musician and is sparing no pains in his effort to bring the band up to a high standard. H. P. Dane, principal musician, left this afternoon for Americus to purchase a set of instruments from the band there. There is not a man in camp who deserves more credit for the excellent work the regiment is doing that Adjt. W. O. D. Rockwell of Savannah. Lieut. Kimbrough of Capt. Burr’s company, also deserves special mention. He has been offered the appointment of adjutant of Beck’s battalion, and says he will probably accept. Capt. Joe Gilbert of Albany, was officer of the day and discharged his duty in a most satisfactory way, and received several compliments front the staff. 

 

Savannah Morning News.
August 18, 1898

DON’T WANT TO MUSTER OUT.
THIRD REGIMENT LIKELY TO BE FULL BY FRIDAY.
Grave Fears That an Order Will Be lssued Mustering Out the Men—A Midnight Meeting of Officers to Devise Some Plan of Holding Together the Regiment—Capt. Kolshorn’s Company to Be Mustered in This Morning—Strict Rules Enforced.
Griffin, Ga., Aug. 17.—Camp Northern now has the largest regiment of men ever encamped upon this beautiful site before. It is believed the Third Regiment will be full by Friday. The officers and men are evidently entertaining grave fears of the possibility of being mustered out of service, now that the war is over. Although every item is closely guarded against the newspapers, it is known that a called meeting of every commissioned officer in camp was held at Col. Candler’s quarters at 12 o’clock last night to discuss the proper course to pursue to prevent the order for disbanding the regiment. What was done at this meeting could not be learned, but it is known that Col. Candler was in communication with the war department all day and that recruits were being rushed to the camp as rapidly as possible. Many private consultations between the colonel and officers were held during the day. Some wished to petition the war department to be sent to Santiago, while others would go anywhere in the world rather than disband, but Col. Candler would allow no petition of any nature to be circulated. Only five men to each company are allowed passes from the grounds each day. This goes rather hard on the men, who have been in the habit of visiting our city each night and much complaining is heard. But that is the order and it must be obeyed. Seventy-two guards are now stationed around the grounds during the day and double this number during the night. This makes it next to an impossibility for one to run the lines. The men. however, are making the best of this, and always spend their idle moments In learning tactics in their company street. Tuesday afternoon the entire regiment went on a long march. They were headed by Col Candler and staff and marched to Experiment and back. The men stood the trip well, and are anxious for another. Capt. Kolshorn has been in camp several days from Savannah, and with his full company will be mustered in tomorrow morning. Capt. Gilbert has a company of well selected men, all of fine specimen and well-drilled. The regimental band is now furnishing the music for the regiment, and is doing remarkably well for a new organization.

 

Savannah Morning News
August 20, 1898

THIRD REGIMENT FULL UP
Mustering In Exercise to be Witnessed by  Gov. Atkinson.

Griffin, Ga., Aug. 19.— The Third Georgia Regiment has secured more than its quota of men and will he mustered into the service of the United States to-morrow, which will be an important day at Camp Northern. Gov. Atkinson and his staff will come down and be present when the regiment is mustered in. They will be accompanied by a delegation from the Ladies Relief Association and the Army and Navy League, who will present the regiment with two beautiful flags. Among the ladles who will grace our city with their presence will be Mrs. W. Y. Atkinson, Mrs. John S. Candler, Mrs. Lolie M. Gordon, Miss Ella Powell and Miss Jennie English, who will be most delightfully entertained by the officers at Camp Northern. Gov. Atkinson to-day appointed Troup Whitehead as second lieutenant in Company C of Savannah, which office was made vacant by the resignation of Lieut. Leaken. Private Slater, of Capt. Davies’ company, has received promotion and is now drum major for the Third Regiment Band. Sergt. Vason of Company F has been temporarily detailed as commissary sergeant. Lieut. Hastings of Capt. Sanford’s company has been temporarily detailed regimental commissary, and Sergt. Napier of Capt. Sanders’ company is temporarily serving as sergeant major. It is said that the ordnance stores for the regiment have berm shipped and will be here in a few days when the regiment will be thoroughly equipped.

 

Savannah Morning News
August 23, 1898

THE THIRD TO BE RETAINED.
SECRETARY OF WAR GIVES HIS PROMISE TO LIVINGSTON.
Where the Regiment Will Go Is Not Known, But Col. Livingston Is Pulling for Their Assignment to Manila—Thought That Many More Troops Will Be Wanted There, and Plans Are Being Made Accordingly. First and Second Alabama to Be Mustered Out—Third Alabama to Be Retained.
Washington, Aug 22.—The Secretary of War has given his promise that the Third Georgia Regiment “shall not be among those first mustered out. He did that this morning in response to the request of Col. Livingston, who came on to Washington in the interest of the boys of the Third.
The congressman from the Fifth district went to the war department bright and early this morning and at once enlisted in his cause Assistant Secretary Meiklejohn, with whom he served several years in the House, and who is his personal friend.
The assistant secretary took the matter up at once. Col. Livingston told him of the excellent personnel of the regiment and of the great desire of officers and men for service. They were willing, he said, to go anywhere—their only desire being to see service. Col. Meiklejohn at once laid the matter before the secretary. The matter was discussed with Gen. Alger for a few minutes, and when he was in possession of all the facts, he told Col. Livingston that he might telegraph Col. Candler that his regiment would be retained in the service.
Where the regiment will go is not as yet known. Col. Livingston has put in a strong bid for the regiment to be assigned to Manila. The impression is strong that a good many more additional troops will have to be sent to Manila before peace and quiet is restored there. This is the impression both at the war and navy departments, and plans are being made accordingly. In view of this there may be a good chance for the Third going out there.
It was stated at the war department this morning that the First and Second Alabama regiments are to be mustered out.
The Third Alabama, a negro regiment, is to be retained.

 

Savannah Morning News
August 23, 1898

PRESENTED WITH COLORS.
Col. Candler Doesn’t Know What Will Be Done With His Men.
Griffin, Ga., Aug. 22.—During the greater part of to-day there were no sentinels on duty at Camp Northern. Only the prisoners were guarded by a small squad. This was the result of an order requiring the property of every man to be inspected and checked before going into the hands of the regimental quartermaster.
Lieut. T. F. Hastings will at once relieve Lieut. F. L. Palmer of the duties of acting regimental quartermaster, and Lieut. Palmer leaves in a few days for Atlanta, where he will finish his duties connected with the mobilization of the Third Georgia Regiment and thence return to his duties as first lieutenant Twenty-first Infantry, United States Army.
Some talk was heard regarding the moving of this regiment to Cuba at an early date. Col. Candler has reported to the adjutant general at Washington, but no orders have yet been received, and he does not know what will be done with his regiment. They are ready and willing to go anywhere in the world the authorities see fit to send them. This afternoon a committee of young ladies came down from Atlanta, and, in behalf of the Young Ladies’ Relief Association of that city, presented the regiment with a handsome flag. The young ladies were met at the depot by Col. Candler’s staff and escorted to the post, where all arrangements for the presentation had been made.
Every man in the regiment was at his post of duty, and a larger body of men was never seen on the grounds before.
Miss Jennie English, one of Atlanta’s fairest daughters, in a most graceful and becoming manner, presented the flag. At Col. Candler’s request, Maj. Spence, who had fought and bled for the colors, received them in a most appropriate way. His words of thanks showed his love for duty of his country. His tribute to the noble association presenting them with the handsome flag was a just one.
Sergt. Wooten, of Capt. Van Riper’s company, First Battalion, was /detailed as color sergeant, while Private Johnson of Capt. Davies’ company, Second Battalion, and Private Harp of Capt. Burr’s company, Third Battalion, were chosen guards to the colors.
Capt. Baker of the Second Battalion is color company of his regiment. Capt. Burr’s Company, Third Battalion, will act as escort to the colors.
The ladies of Atlanta are to present the regiment with another large and handsome flag in a few days.
Nine men were mustered in to-day, which were given to Capts. Sanders, Van Riper and Hodges, which fills their companies up to 106 men, the full quota.
Capt. Kolshorn of Savannah and Capt. Gilbert  of Albany have 101 men each, and say they could get fifty others before Saturday if needed.
Capt. Gilbert’s company is now the banner company in camp and its officers are working faithfully to keep it in the lead.

 

Americus Times-Tecorder
August 27, 1898

Georgia’s Military Muddle

An Atlanta special to the Savannah News discusses the status of the Georgia military and gives at length Gov. Atkinson’s views on the all important question. If the governor is quoted correctly the Times-Recorder applauds his bold, patriotic stand and hopes the war department will consider the feasible proposition of Georgia’s governor in the disposition of our military. The News’ correspondent says:
From all accounts there appears to be a pretty row on in the Third Georgia Regiment, now stationed at Camp Northen, over the reported desire of a large majority of the privates to be mustered out of the service at once, while the officers are trying to throttle this sentiment and keep the regiment that they may continue to wear shoulder straps and draw rations from the government crib.
Incidentally Gov. Atkinson, who has been appealed to by some of the men, is disgusted with the whole business and says that he wishes the whole volunteer army of this state would come up like men and, if it is their real desire, say in plain terms that they want to he mustered out.
The governor does not care to have much to say about the situation, and when questioned by the Morning News correspondent about it he was disposed to show impatience with the whole military establishment.
The Georgia boys enlisted to fight Spaniards, and he thinks that they did, and now want to go back to their business at home since there is nothing left to do but to perform police or garrison duty. The governor thinks they ought to say so without quibbling and thus settle the matter. It is said that the governor has suggested to the war department that all who desire to be mustered out in the three Georgia regiments be allowed to do so, and those who wish to serve be formed into a regiment. The idea is that if such course should be adopted enough men would be left who are willing and anxious to do garrison duty to form a complete regiment and thus all would be satisfied. Of course there would he a superfluity of officers, though it quite certain that some, at least of the officers, now in service with the governor’s regiments, including field officers, would prefer to quit rather than be sent off to some of our new possessions to do garrison duty.
While nothing positive is known as to their wishes it is said at the capital that neither Col. Lawton or Lieut Col. Garrard would care to continue in the service doing garrison duty.
Col. Oscar Brown is naturally anxious to continue, as war is his profession and the disbandment of his regiment of volunteers would mean that he resume his former rank as captain in the regular would service.
Col. John Candler of the Third Regiment also wants to serve his term, wherever his regiment may be sent, and from all accounts it seems that Lieut. Col. Berner is also stuck on his job and would be more than willing to go with the Third anywhere within the jurisdiction of the war department.  to make up one regiment of Georgians composed of those of the present three who want to continue in garrison duty in Cuba or other new possessions, the governor would probably designate the officers who would he retained.
Col. Candler wired from Griffin that he estimated that only about 10 percent of the men in his regiment were desirous of being mustered out. There are contradictory reports from Camp Northern, however, the other side claiming that but for the conduct of the officers in suppressing expression at least 75 per cent, of the men would openly declare their desire to be relieved of military duty, since they are not to have any chance to shoot Spaniards. If the war department should adopt the governor’s idea, that is to make up one regiment of Georgians composed of those of the present three who want to continue in garrison duty in Cuba or other new possessions, the governor would probably designate the officers who would be retained.

 

The Houston Home Journal.
September 01, 1898

Civil vs Military.

     There was a wordy conflict be tween civil and military authorities at Griffin last week, in which the military was victor.
     Several weeks ago a man giving his name as Ed Mallary hired a bicycle from a Fort Valley merchant to ride a few miles into the country, representing himself to be an officer going out to make an arrest.
Several days passed, and the bi cycle was not returned, then a warrant for larceny after trust was issued, Mallary was located, and when an effort to arrest him was made he escaped by running. The next heard from him was at Camp Northern, where he was a private in the Third Ga. Regiment.
     An effort to secure him by the Griffin Chief of police failed. Then Sheriff Cooper forwarded the warrant to the sheriff of Spalding county, writing that officer a letter explaining the circumstances upon which the warrant was based. Under the warrant Mallary was arrested, but an appeal to Col. Candler, in command of the regiment, resulted in his release and all expostulations to the contrary were futile.
To people under civil law this incident seems strange. It appears that military law is supreme when it affects Uncle Sam’s soldiers. If these soldiers are truly exempt from prosecution for violation of criminal law, then the fewer soldiers we have in these parts will be best for the country .—

 

The Macon telegraph

September 09, 1898

…Col. Candler has received orders, to move his regiment to Jacksonville, Fla., where they will report to Gen. Lee. This movement will probably be accomplished tomorrow, or just as soon as the cars necessary for transportation can be secured. Many of the soldiers are anxious to make the move, but others who have beard of the condition of camps at other places freely express a preference for remaining at Camp Northern Surgeon Major L. B. Grandy informed me that the health of the camp had been remarkably, good in spite of the wet weather. The greater portion of the men who were in the hospital were brought there by their imprudence in eating. No camp yet can show as clean a health record as Camp Northern.
The soldiers are deeply regretting the fact that the paymaster has not been in evidence and in speaking of the matter one of them said today: “It is embarrassing to many of us who are sadly in need of change. I know of many who have contracted small bills and enjoyed courtesies here that will leave feeling humiliated over the fact that they cannot discharge their obligations. Yet Uncle Sam, secure in the fact that he is good for his contracts, takes his own time and we are forced to acquiesce.”

 

Savannah Morning News
September 09, 1898

ORDERED TO REPORT TO LEE. THIRD REGIMENT TO MOVE AT ONCE TO JACKSONVILLE.

Col. Candler Receives His Orders Direct From Washington, and There Is No Possibility of a Fake — A General Howl Goes Up Among the Men and Two Commissioned Officers Send In Their Resignation. Thought That Other Officers Will Resign—A Hitch Likely to Occur Because of a Lack of Rations.

Griffin, Ga., Sept. B.—The Third Georgia Regiment, United States Volunteers, have been ordered to Jacksonville, Fla., and this time the order Is no fake, as it comes direct to Col. Candler from Washington.
About 7:30 o’clock last night Col. Candler received a telegram from Adjt. Gen. Corbin telling him to report to Gen. Lee at Jacksonville for duty and to be ready to depart in forty-eight hours.
As has been stated before, this order was preceded on Saturday inst, by a telephone message from Atlanta, stating they would be ordered away, but as no order came, many thought it was a fake, and men were rejoicing over the possibility of being mustered out In a short while. Many think It possible the regiment will break camps to-morrow and leave for their new encampment that night, but as the men will not be paid off until to-morrow morning, It is hardly probable they can complete arrangements and depart so soon. And again there is u hitch in the commissary department. The rations are running short and not enough is now on hand to furnish the men with a three-days’ or field ration. The new supply is billed to arrive Saturday. This may cause a delay of several days and it may be Monday before the regiment leaves. Col. Candler does not know himself when he will move. He will leave just as soon as possible.
When it was officially announced the regiment had been ordered away a general howl of complaint went up throughout the camp. Few of the men are desirous of doing garrison duty. They say they enlisted to fight Spain and not to guard property, as they have property of their own to look after.
As has been stated in the Morning News before, the commissioned officers were dissatisfied at the prospect of going to Jacksonville and threatened to resign their commissions should such be the case.
Two officers, Capt. Robert Hodges of Macon and Lieut. T. J. Ripley of DeKalb, sent in their resignations this afternoon and asked that the same take effect at once. It Is firmly believed at least a dozen other resignations will be handed in before the regiment departs. And yet some of these same officers think the men should remain In service for two years and do garrison duty.
Battery A will receive their pay and thirty days’ furlough to-morrow morning and leave at once for their homes.
Lieut. Brady [Bradley] and a squad of ten men will remain here to guard their property.
Camp Northern will again soon be deserted, unless the report now circulated that two Georgia regiments are soon to be brought here to be mustered out, is correct.

 

Savannah Morning News.
October 14, 1898, Page 2

DESERTER SHOT BY A SQUAD. H. H. DICKINSON MORTALLY WOUNDED NEAR LUELLA.
Corpl. Gossett Sent With a Detail to Take the Deserter Back to Northern and Dickinson and Two Others Resist—Appeared With Winchesters, and Private Marsh Fired on Dickinson in Order to Save the Corporal’s Life.
Griffin. Ga.. Oct. 13.—H. H. Dickinson [Henry H. Dickerson], a deserter from Company B, Third Georgia Regiment, was shot at an early hour this morning and will probably die from the effect of the wound. The shooting was done at Dickinson’s home, near Luella, while he was resisting arrest, by a squad sent to bring him back to Camp Northern The particulars of the affair were furnished by Corpl. R. W. Gossett, who was an eye-witness, and are as follows: At 1 o’clock yesterday morning a squad composed of Corpl. Gossett, Privates [Sam T. ] Jenkins, {William M.] March and LSim L.] Dallas, left this city for the purpose of arresting Dickinson, who was known to be at his father’s home near Luella.
It was 3 o’clock before the Dickinson place was reached and Corpl. Gossett placed his men around the house and awaited the coming of day when It was expected Dickinson would come out.
When the inmates of the house awoke they must have detected the presence of the determined guards surrounding the place for the door opened and Dickinson and two other deserters, Moore and Kitchen, stepped out heavily armed with Winchester rifles and pistols.
Corpl. Gossett recognized the men end called on them to surrender which command they disregarded. Some tried to make their escape, but Dickinson raised his Winchester to fire upon Gossett as soon as he could get a shot. A brother of Dickinson’s came out of the house and happened to get between Dickinson and Gossett and Gossett was unable to use his Springfield without shooting an innocent man.
Private Marsh saw the danger threatening his’officer and fired on Dickinson who fell mortally wounded. In the confusion that followed the other deserters fled to the woods and made their escape.
The corporal of the squad went to the fallen man and found him mortally wound ed. The bullet entered Dickinson’s neck just at the base of the skull and came out of his jaw, tearing one side of his face almost entirely away. At last accounts Dickinson was alive, but his chances for recovery are very slim.

The Dallas New Era
December 02, 1898

THIRD GA., IN SAVANNAH.
Co. C. 3rd Ga., Reg. U. S. V. Inft’y.
     We have taken one step toward what we have for over three long months been so anxiously waiting. The 3rd Ga., broke camps at Camp Northern Monday morning [November 21, 1898] and boarded the cars for Savannah at 3:15 p. m. Col. Rob’t Lee Berner wired Macon and Savannah ahead, and plenty of good sweetened coffee was ready at Macon for supper and Tuesday morning at  4 o’clock we arrived here, drank our coffee, ate our hardtack and quietly rested on the cars till reveille.
      At the first call at 5 o’clock the cars were unloaded at the  Georgia Car and Manufacturing Co.’s sheds, which were within a few hours converted into a splendid camp.
       Company “C,” who are noted for their quiet energy, were, as they always are, among the first to erect tents and get everything in perfect order. All the boys are very anxious to “take in” the city but a guard line was the first thing to be established, and only five at a time are allowed out.
Col. Berner took the wise precaution to remind the men by sections as they lined up on the parade grounds at Camp Northern to march to the cars, that he wanted his regiment to break the record of all former regiments, who have passed through the country, for good conduct,
      A sergeant was put in command of each car, and through the diligent execution of duty, and the high state of refinement of the privates, of which we boasted we secured compliments from the people in all the places we passed through, with cheers and good wishes which were highly creditable to the regiment.
     Nothing official has been heard as to when we will proceed to Cuba. It is reported that two transports, one of them the Chester, have sailed from New York and it is the belief that the Chester will carry Georgia boys to their new post.
     The 3rd Ga., is in a very fine state of health; a few cases of a very mild type of measles, and some pretty sore arms from vaccination are all the complaints heard.
     I am proud to say, to the credit of the Dallas and Paulding county boys, that they have, with one exception, a splendid company record, and have the highest praises by the commanding officer for their obedience to orders and strict adherence to duty. If the editor will kindly publish this I will promise through your column to keep my good friends and loved ones posted as to what we are doing. With best wishes for the kind editor success to the New Era and all Dallas and all Paulding county.
     I am your friend,
     Serg’t
Camp Northen continued to be the site of annual encampments of the Georgia National Guard until 1910. The camp was then turned over to the city of Griffin and became a park. This park is located in southwest Griffin, GA. A road in the north part of the park still bears the name “Camp Northen”.

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